A catch up Feature with Christina Stohn

Tell us how this body of work came to the surface. When did it begin and what were your inspirations? Höllental und Himmelreich, which translates as ‘Valley of Death and Kingdom of Heaven’, is about tradition, folklore and religious beliefs in the Black Forest, a region in south west Germany. I grew up there, but then moved away for a decade to study photography in London and Bremen. I began the project under the working title Paradise Lost during my studies at the University of Westminster around 2012. When I returned to my home country, I had the urge to document these once familiar surroundings based on a feeling of distance and displacement. I used a minimalist approach in which landscapes void of people, and captured in foggy conditions, created a sense of mystery. At that time I drew my main inspiration from Hiroshi Sugimoto and Nadav Kander. As part of later research, I was inspired by a number of photo books relating to the Black Forest, especially Interieurs by Thomas Ruff, Einmal im Jahr by Axel Hoedt and Cuckoo Clock and Cherry Cake by Anne-Sophie Stolz. However, I did not set out to create a body of work in the style of any specific photographer.

From the series  Paradise Lost

From the series Paradise Lost

Did Höllental und Himmelreich further your decision to study in Bremen? I remember seeing the exhibition Landmark: the Fields of Photography at London’s Somerset House in 2013. This impressive show provided an overview of 21st century landscape photography featuring more than 70 international artists. However, one specific piece of work resonated deeply with me: Heimat_31, Schwarzwald by Peter Bialobrzeski (2004). It showed a vast snow-covered scenery in the Black Forest with tiny human figures populating the foreground. I instantly felt a personal affiliation with it, bringing back memories of winter trips in my childhood. This imagery made me strive further to make a real project in the Black Forest, my native soil. I distanced myself from empty landscapes and became interested in the relationship between people and place, a new venture for me. Then I found out that Peter Bialobrzeski, a professor of photography, ran the Master’s studio ‘Culture and Identity’ together with the graphic design professor, Andrea Rauschenbusch. This studio combined both my interests: photography and design and so I decided to leave London to study at the University of the Arts in Bremen.

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Tell us about the Black Forest. Why is this location important to you? The project results from my personal experience of growing up and living in the Black Forest. When I came to live in London I began to see things I had not previously been aware of. The Black Forest is one of the most popular holiday destinations in Germany. Tourist clichés and ‘Heimat’ films carry associations of an idyllic life in unspoilt landscapes and nature. I have always been annoyed about this idea of an ‘all-encompassing idyll’ and never connected to it. So my series is a bit of a challenge to everyone expecting these kinds of stereotypes. Even though high-tech companies are located in the area, village life is steeped in tradition across the generations. Seasonal festivals and religious processions are celebrated and centuries-old customs show no signs of being forgotten. These customs have also become commercialised and established for tourism and I find it interesting to pose questions concerning their significance within our more plural society.

From the series  Höllental und Himmelreich

From the series Höllental und Himmelreich

What have you learnt from making this work? To be honest, the journey has not always been comfortable. I have had quite a few arguments about both content and aesthetics of my work. Over the years my image making process has developed. I now follow specific methods and I am really happy that I found a visual vocabulary to express my views. I have started to trust my instincts, no matter what others say. It is impossible to please everyone anyway! Producing this work has also taught me to be patient, as it has already taken a few years of going back and forth. When it comes to editing, this process is quite challenging. I have to be ruthless to edit my images and it takes time for the narrative to start fitting together. Seeing the work progress and strengthen is very rewarding.

Installation shot of  Höllental und Himmelreich

Installation shot of Höllental und Himmelreich

Tell us about your written thesis which accompanies this body of work. What was your main focus and why? In my thesis I critically analyse the German term ‘Heimat’. It is a complicated construct, which can translate into English as 'home', 'homeland' or 'native region'. The notion of ‘Heimat’ combines the ideas of a place of origin, a sense of belonging and identity. However, the concept carries both positive as well as negative connotations.

I took one semester off in Bremen to attend classes at the University of Freiburg given by the cultural anthropologist Werner Mezger, a specialist in south-western German regional culture. The university library offered extensive research material on the term, which is centuries old. My goal was to reach a historical understanding and examine its varied cultural manifestations. Nevertheless, after a year of researching the idea of ‘Heimat’, the negative aspects of the term still troubled me.

In my thesis I refer to academic sources by writers, scholars and politicians and juxtapose their definitions, contrasting one quotation with another. The introductory quotation is by author Martin Walser (1968). It reads: “Heimat, das ist sicher der schönste Name für Zurückgebliebenheit.”, which translates as: “Heimat is certainly the most beautiful name for having stayed behind.” But I enquire whether the term is still relevant in an increasingly globalised world. The plural form ‘Heimaten’ is rarely used. Given the increase in mobility and migration, I query if the term still refers to one specific location.

From the series  Höllental und Himmelreich

From the series Höllental und Himmelreich

'Heimat' sounds really interesting and you've mentioned it can't fully be translated into English. Can you describe to us what connotations this word has and how it relates to your work? ‘Heimat’ has spatial, political, social, cultural and emotional connotations. Etymologically, the term is based on the Germanic term ‘haima’, meaning village or home. However, over time it has acquired multiple and problematic associations. In the 18th century, ‘Heimat’ was conceptualised as a space of identity and origin. Throughout the Romantic period ‘Heimat’ echoed a sentimental longing for homeland. The ‘blood-and-soil’ propaganda by the Nazis brought ‘Heimat’ into dispute. Most recently, the term has experienced a renaissance in the political field: the Home Office has been renamed the ‘Heimatministerium’.

In my work I have always questioned how to approach regional customs. Structures, which help to create community, like tradition and local practices seem to contribute to the stabilisation of a sense of home. Factors like language and religion form collective ties. These are symbols of togetherness but also delineation. On the one hand, repetitive customs serve to preserve tradition and culture, but on the other hand they are from a past era. ‘Heimat’ is supposed to be familiar to us. Because of my experiences abroad, my perspective on the Black Forest region has become one of alienation from these once familiar surroundings. Now ‘Heimat’ becomes something artificial, like a stage set in a theatre.

From the series  Höllental und Himmelreich

From the series Höllental und Himmelreich

What are your plans for the near future? Short term, in April I will join my former fellow students and professors from the University of the Arts in Bremen on a field trip to Sarajevo. As every year, each of us will work on a different concept on the city and we will then publish an artist book from all our work.

I cannot see myself finishing Höllental und Himmelreich in the near future. There are still more locations and events to go to. However, I have got a lot of material already so it is my goal to make a second edition of the book. The first edition as part of my graduate work was quite expensive to produce so I would like to make a different version, which can be made available to a wider audience.

I exhibited a selection of images during our degree show. Given the opportunity, I would like to show the series in its entirety, so I am hoping to have a solo exhibition.

I have currently started developing a new long-term body of work in the region of Freiburg.

Other than that, I am looking into grants and artist residencies. I would love to have the opportunity to make more work abroad.

I am splitting my time between personal projects and commissioned work and am currently working towards getting more editorial stories as a freelance photographer.


The Full Picture: The stories behind the photographs - A Kickstarter Campaign

A photo book where photographers choose one of their own images and reveal the story behind their chosen image - managed and curated by Tom Carpenter, founder of LeftaBit.


My name is Tom Carpenter and I curate a blog called LeftaBit. I have recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for a project called The Full Picture. The idea for The Full Picture came about when listening a photographer speak at an event in London in 2015. This particular photographer told such incredible stories, not necessarily about the image itself, but instead she told the backstories to how the images came about.

After that event I was intrigued to find out if other photographers had similar stories behind their photographs. As the stories came through from the photographers, some of the stories made me laugh others made me question how they had made it to the point of getting the image at all. One thing that stood out to me with the stories was that a lot of the photographers had had to come through some sort of adversity and at times fear or crippling self doubt to capture that final image.  

This is something that really resonated with me, because I think we’ve all been in a position where you are in a unfamiliar place with a camera in your hands and you are having an internal battle, what am I doing here, why do I need to get this photo and who else actually cares. We compound these thoughts afterwards by going onto social media and spending hours looking at other people’s so called perfect lives or perfect photographs, and in turn piling more and more pressure onto ourselves.

The Full Picture for me highlighted in a way that the photographers I admire most also have those days where nothing seems to go as planned, where they are in a situation where fear of self doubt has them questioning what they do. This project highlights that in a small way, but it also shows that with perseverance and hard work you can get that one shot that makes it all worth while.

You can still pledge towards The Full Picture up until Thursday 4th April by clicking here.

2020 Collective Present: Environ 

Private View ·  Thu 21 March · 6 - 9pm ·  Copeland Gallery ·  SE15 3SN
Exhibition continues · Fri 22 March · 11 - 4 


2020 is a collective of photographers who create work internationally, collaborating on projects from their studio base in South East London.

For the first time, they will exhibit work together at Copeland Gallery, Peckham. Highlighting the work of twenty members, Environ will exhibit personal projects exploring the human condition within domestic, natural and imagined environments.

Tami Aftab  ·  Joe Beeching  ·  Lily Boyle   ·  Byron Chambers  ·  Tom Coleman  ·  Nathan Keir Crofton-Bond  ·  Oliver Dawson  ·  Maite de Orbe  ·  Rachel Gordon  ·  James Greenhalgh  ·  Matilda Hallander  ·  Unai Mateo Lopez  ·  Frederik Marks  ·   Dina Patey   ·  Prim Patnasiri   ·  Phoebe Somerfield  ·  Peter Stewart-Sykes  ·  India Tuersley  ·  Andrea Urbez  ·  Coco Wu 

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Click here to book your space.

Positive Light Projects presents Dartmoor Summer School of Photography

Dartmoor Summer School of Photography is a week long experimental photography residential taking place on Dartmoor National Park in the summer of 2019. The Dartmoor Summer School of Photography offers the opportunity for a group of visual artists to join together to explore their relationship with photography with the guidance of a selection of renowned artists and photographers in the midst of one of Britains most beautiful national parks.

Days comprise of workshops, assignments, time to experiment, explore and make work. Evenings offer a variety of activities including talks, music recitals, games, time to make more work, night walks, bird watching, swimming, eating together, sitting round the fire and socialising.

The week ends with a group exhibition of the work made during the residential.

The ethos of the Dartmoor Summer School of Photography is to think outside the box, open up, expect the unexpected, step outside your comfort zone. Experiment. Play. Enjoy. 

 
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WORKSHOPS

The week will be split between led workshops with a specific focus and time to develop your own work in response and/or pursue other directions. Students will be able to select 3 out of a possible 5 day long artist led workshops to participate in during the week.

Sian Davey    Presence as an Inquiry   My workshops will be focused on our relationship to our practice. Use your work to explore the bigger inquiry of how did we get here and perhaps where do we want to go.

Sian Davey
Presence as an Inquiry

My workshops will be focused on our relationship to our practice. Use your work to explore the bigger inquiry of how did we get here and perhaps where do we want to go.

Susan Derges    Field Work   In this workshop we will be exploring an intimate and tactile approach to photographing the land and it’s connection to ourselves.

Susan Derges
Field Work

In this workshop we will be exploring an intimate and tactile approach to photographing the land and it’s connection to ourselves.

Jem Southam    Light Atmosphere   This workshop will focus on attention to the relationship between light and atmospheric conditions and the making of colour photographs.

Jem Southam
Light Atmosphere

This workshop will focus on attention to the relationship between light and atmospheric conditions and the making of colour photographs.

Brendan Barry    Constructed Observations   In this workshop we will be constructing a camera obscura, converting it into a giant camera, setting up a darkroom inside and working with it to capture what we can observe and/or construct in front of it using traditional analogue black and white processes.

Brendan Barry
Constructed Observations

In this workshop we will be constructing a camera obscura, converting it into a giant camera, setting up a darkroom inside and working with it to capture what we can observe and/or construct in front of it using traditional analogue black and white processes.

 
Jason Evans    Ant Pictures   Evans’ workshop encourages participants to experience Dartmoor from a different perspective. Relationships between still life and landscape are up for discussion.

Jason Evans
Ant Pictures

Evans’ workshop encourages participants to experience Dartmoor from a different perspective. Relationships between still life and landscape are up for discussion.


Location

The Summer School will be held at The Dartmoor Training Centre not far from Two Bridges, on the banks of the West Dart River in the heart of the Dartmoor National Park, Devon. The Centre lies in a tranquil, secluded valley with easy access to the open moor.

What to bring

Specialist materials needed for workshops will be included, however participants may need to bring some of their own equipment depending on which workshops they partake in. A guide of what you will need to bring will be sent out to successful applicants.

Food

All meals are included. A cooked breakfast, lunch and sit down evening meal, with snacks and drinks available throughout the day. The menu will be vegetarian and as much as possible sourced locally, an effort to reduce our environmental impact. You are welcome to bring extra food. We will endeavour to cater for any extra dietary needs.


Application deadline : extended to 14th April 2019

Applicants will be informed of the results of the selection process by the end of April.

Successful applicants must confirm their participation by payment of the fee within 7 working days of notification. 

Contact.
Twitter.
Instagram.

Introducing FORM

In this blog post we introduce you to FORM, a lens based collective who create and communicate on issues concerning altered identity. FORM are currently calling for work for an exhibition in Derby. FORM Fringe will coincide with FORMAT International Photography Festival 2019 which will consist of a series of exhibitions, events, and a photobook stall. Click here to find out how to submit. Deadline Sunday 24th February 10am and entry is free.


What is FORM? FORM is a collective of artists based across the UK who all work with photography. Our specialisms range from graphic design, creative writing, artist book making, event planning, product photography, socially engaged practice and teaching. Our core aim is to support the production of new projects by sharing skills, collaborating and creating a community of artists.

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Tell us about the members of FORM. Have you all studied photography? FORM is made up of Becky, Cath, Jo, June, Liz and Rachael. Becky and June both studied Photography at MA level, at London College of Communication and Westminster respectively. Jo also studied at LCC for her BA in Photography, and Rachael also studied BA Photography but at Manchester School of Art. Liz studied her BA in Brighton, which allowed her to produce image and text for her dissertation and Cath studied on a Creative Arts degree and now teaches Photography A Level.

Who or what motivates members to continue making new work? We all motivate each other, that’s one of the huge benefits of working as a collective. Photography can be very solitary, and even though we all produce work at different rates we all benefit from feedback from the rest of the group and having a deadline.

How did FORM come to the surface? We were established in response to Redeye, the Photography Network’s ‘Lightbox’ program; a creative development course where photographers are grouped into collectives and supported through talks, workshops and provided a mentor. FORM were matched with Nicola Shipley of Grain Photography Hub and since the program ended have continued to work together and with Nicola to make new work.

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What is the collectives biggest achievement to date? Our first exhibition together at Brighton Photo Fringe is the biggest project we’ve worked on to date. All of the members developed new projects responding to the title of ‘Form’ while organising the fundraising, curation and promotion of the exhibition. We were based in the Collectives Hub alongside some brilliant fellow collectives and projects and received some great feedback on the show.

Tell us about the conversations you produce for your website. What's your aim for them? The conversations started initially to informally introduce the members and give us all the opportunity to know each other better, but that format suits us perfectly because it represents how we want to work as a collective.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? If you like what we do please follow us on Instagram! FORM is currently looking to work with other photographers as part of the fringe at FORMAT International Photography Festival, details of this can be found on www.formcollective.co.uk.

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Give one tip to new photography graduates. Work with other creatives! Find people who you can work with to motivate each other, get honest feedback and collaborate with. Even if they aren’t a photographer, having someone to push you to keep making work and applying for opportunities is invaluable.

What does 2019 have in store for FORM? We have recently received Arts Council funding to produce work and exhibit in a fringe alongside the FORMAT International Photography Festival. We are all continuing to develop new work for more FORM exhibitions and events, and we want to meet and work with new people. We are also very excited about the launch of Landform, a platform for female landscape photographers run by Cath. Landform will be having their first events in 2019, and there will be plenty of opportunities to get involved in photo walks and socials this year.




Introducing Landform

In this blog post we introduce you to Landform, a network developed to promote and support the work of female landscape photographers. Supporting each other in practice and engagement with landscape.


Image by Lisa Bond

Image by Lisa Bond

Who are you, what’s your motto? I am Cath Stanley, a landscape and fine art photographer based in Manchester.  I am one of the members of FORM Collective, a relatively new collective who has just completed a successful first year.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I graduated with a creative arts degree and have taught graphics and photography in further education for the last 17 years. Having taught in an art department you become quite familiar with many creative techniques, my last project took on a more mixed media style.

I am part of FORM collective, a group of talented photographers and image makers from across the UK.  Last year we put together our first exhibition at the collective hub as part of Brighton Photo Fringe.  

Image by Cath Stanley

Image by Cath Stanley

What’s your favourite style of photography? That is a difficult question, I actually like and appreciate a lot of different styles of photography. Although my main work is based in the area of landscape, I often find great interest in alternative photography techniques, I like the aesthetic of film and some of the camera-less methods. I like photography with an interesting story behind it, something that opens conversations or raises questions, expresses a point of view or just simply engages the audience in different ways.  

Who motivates you? I love travel and adventure, I like exploring and different types of landscape really motivate me. I have always been a bit of a daydreamer and spent quite a bit of my early education staring out of the window at the outdoors. The idea of just being able to lose yourself amongst mist shrouded mountains, or explore wild moors, see sun rays beaming through clouds or capture forests of tightly knit trees, it is the landscape itself gives me a real sense of wellbeing. Sometimes I return to locations and document the change in seasonal colours as this particularly interests me.

Image by Joanne Coates

Image by Joanne Coates

Can you tell us what Landform is? I set up Landform as a network to develop, promote and support the work of female photographers who are interested in landscape. Through social media, meet ups at various locations around the UK, photo walks, portfolio/work reviews, workshops and possible exhibitions it is my aim to support others in our practice and engagement with landscape.

Landform aims to bring female photographers together, of all levels and abilities, to encourage a supportive group, to share good practice and skills, whilst exploring new areas within the landscape as a group. 

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Landform? There are lots of reasons to why I set up Landform, firstly landscape photography can be quite solitary and some of the best light to capture during the day is tricky especially if you live in a city. Having a community, a group of like-minded individuals to support and share good practice with means we can explore and engage new locations safely.  

There is also a real imbalance of female photographers to males in industry, with just under 30%, maybe even less in landscape. As a female landscape photographer, full time teacher and a mum it is very hard to gain a balance, to juggle all the responsibilities to just be able to drop everything and go out to take photographs. Most importantly that no matter what your photographic ability is or whether using a mobile phone, I would like Landform to be open to all.

Image by Lisa Bond

Image by Lisa Bond

What is Landforms biggest achievement to date? Landform is very much within its infancy, but I have had overwhelming support from both other photography networks and groups of people who are interested in supporting or joining me at events. I am a big fan of using social media to share other peoples accounts and promote work, I think that sometimes as photography can be quite isolated and using social media can be for some quite daunting it is difficult to become lost, especially as landscape photography is so popular. I have received so many positive and heart-warming messages from followers who are genuinely surprised that I have shared their accounts. 

Image by Joanne Coates

Image by Joanne Coates

How can photographers get involved in what you do? Landform on Instagram offers a place for female landscape photographers or image makers of any level to share their images, it is a platform to promote their work and a space that is a supportive community for other like-minded individuals.   

Later this year I am running a series of social meet ups and photo walks out in the Peak District and other locations, building our community and enabling individuals to meet, share good practice, create new opportunities 

Image by Cath Stanley

Image by Cath Stanley

Give one tip to new photography graduates? Opportunities, take opportunities and then create opportunities for others because everyone needs a bit of help just to grow and to believe in themselves.

What does 2019 have in store for Landform? As Landform is still in its very early stages I am hoping to establish a community and the support for others grows both on social media and on photo walks.

SEMIMAGAZINE Issue 1 * ALPHA *

Semi Magazine is a non-profit, independently published online and annual print magazine championing new voices within the global art community. Work featured in Semi Magazine often comments, acknowledges and questions current and past sociology. We feature artwork deemed topical or important in some way or work which has openly been worked on with passion and vigour. Semi Magazine was established in late 2017 and is funded entirely by its own revenue and, lovingly, by its founders.

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Semi Magazine Issue 1 * ALPHA *  consists of 160 pages of artistic narrative and exploration on a few important topics within sociology and global society. In this issue we explore intuition, anticipation, commodity, tradition, imperfection, skaters, women and politics influencing sociology.

Featuring the work of Alyssa Fujita Karoui, Arthur Fechoz, China Hopson, Ioanna Sakellaraki, Laura Dow, Sophie Barbasch, Tilyen Mucik, Jeroen De Wandel and Marie Smith.

The A5-ish sized magazine is printed on 100gsm Archival Matte Art Paper and Perfect Bound. The Magazine is costs €17.99 but currently is on sale at €15.00 (without shipping) to celebrate our first ever celebration. Our first print run is small at 50 copies so sales are limited.

Alyssa Fujita Karoui  Minor Revelations  Spread

Alyssa Fujita Karoui Minor Revelations Spread

Sophie Barbasch  Military Logic  Spread

Sophie Barbasch Military Logic Spread

Arthur Fechoz  Horizon

Arthur Fechoz Horizon

COALVILLE PHOTOGRAPHS SELECTED FOR INTERNATIONAL ARTS BIENNIAL

Coalville photographer Christopher Mear has been selected to take part in the UK Young Artist City Takeover in Nottingham (7 – 13 February). Chris has been photographing the town and it’s people for ten years and is delighted to have been selected for one of the largest biennials of national and international artists in the world UKYA City Takeover comes to Nottingham, 7 - 13 February 2019; uniting 250 artists from 25 countries. It will span the city, immersing visitors in an array of extraordinary, innovative and contemporary work, from visual arts to performance; music; applied arts; literature; digital arts and moving image. Expect to encounter art and performance in cultural spaces as well as unusual places. From caves to cafes; markets to museums; studios to the streets - the City Takeover weaves a rich tapestry of venues across Nottingham.

Born, raised and currently living in Leicestershire, Christopher Mear has been making photographs over the last decade about the industrial history of the English landscape and its people, exploring its past and present. Mear uses his photography as a way to understand the social, economic and physical impact that the time of de-industrialisation, which coincided with his own lifetime, has had.

In 2014 Mear began to work with a local photographer he had discovered online; this meeting of artists eventually led to a collaborative project, Mear losing then recovering his photographic mojo and, ultimately, a series of videos and wonderful “shared” photobook produced by Mear. This interesting and unusual take reminds us all of the importance of collaboration and working together with other artists — without competition, not a race to the top, but shared progress, failures and successes.

Christopher will be exhibiting his photographs, books and short films in Sneinton Market during the week long city takeover.

From the series  Coalville Photographed

From the series Coalville Photographed

A catch up Feature with Sahil Lodha

Tell us about your series FUR. What is it about? The images in this set are from the photo series I did in my first semester at Paris College of Art. Our brief was to create content for the brand LONGCHAMP using some of their products. When we were at the flagship store of the brand the Violet Color FUR coat and its design stood out to me and having shot some images on FUR on film before I thought it could be interesting selecting that as my product for the brief. I wanted to shoot this assignment with Ann the model who I knew would carry it off well with her lively and outgoing personality. Patricia from Makeupforever Academy did the makeup and this made some of the images stand out really well... Eventually I made a short film and made some photographs shooting outdoors using natural light in some Parisian locations. 

From the series  FUR

From the series FUR

Who or what inspired this work? I was quite keen on creating content for a Fashion brand as I had not done something along those lines before. Sometimes the person you shoot with makes a whole lot of difference and shooting with Ann April was incredible. I got introduced to her by my professor during a workshops at Paris College of Art. I knew instantly that I had to shoot a story with her at some point. It was also the first time I made and edited a short film. The way it was shot and the way it turned out had a lot to with the models personality; I just let it flow. Also, shooting at iconic Parisian locations was an inspiration.

Is this work finished or have you got any further ideas for it? This work is finished. I learnt a few things about video editing in the process and I now need to apply those better when I work with a brand again in the future.

From the series  FUR

From the series FUR

From the series  FUR

From the series FUR

For your series Fancy a Whim!? you worked in Bombay with a clothing brand. Tell us more. This was a collaboration with the clothing brand and it was exciting to be working on a fashion editorial in Bombay. It was quite challenging as the creative direction; choosing who and how and where to shoot and also selecting the clothes was all done by myself. So part of the styling and creative direction was both handled by myself. Normally I just take the photographs but I loved the fact that with this work, I could be in full creative control of the everything. 

It was shot at Madh Island close to the Madh Fort with a backdrop of dried fish. The place added a lot of texture and I shot everything right before sunset. My aim was also to catch the warm evening light.

I've developed an interest for outdoor fashion stories in the last year or so; it allows me to let the models be themselves and also allows more room for the stylist to give directions and gives so much more flow to the story. I wanted to work with Aarshi Banerjee the actress and model who was recently seen in the film MAYA by Mia Hansen Love. I'm glad it all worked out in the end and I left Bombay the day after and got all my film scanned at my lab in Paris. 

From the series  Fancy a Whim!?

From the series Fancy a Whim!?

How did this opportunity arise? I had a week left in Bombay and some extra film on me and I thought to myself “I have to shoot one story where I manage everything.” For previous work I made in Bombay I had a stylist/moodboard/team alongside me and I mostly only had to photograph. With this one, I wanted to try and see if I was capable enough to do everything on my own. So I worked to make it happen! I contacted the brand myself and sourced the clothes, I selected the people I wanted to shoot with. Purvi at WhimBypoorvi was supportive enough and appreciated what I brought to the table. I had the clothes at my disposal and both the models I shot with were very warm and friendly. I want to make a lot of work for clothing brands going ahead and with the rich texture of the Indian textile and handloom I now have work to show when I approach other clothing brands in India and even further afield.

From the series  Fancy a Whim!?

From the series Fancy a Whim!?

You used a make-up artist, stylist, and models for this location shoot. How did you project manage this? To be honest I've had days when I feel it’s all worthless, I am neither making too much money nor is this work going to be seen or have any significance but once the pictures are washed, developed and scanned it fills me up with new creative energy. I love seeing the end product which is always so satisfying. I have to thank all the makeup artists, models and stylists I had the opportunity to work with the last few months. They brought in a new energy and believed in what I wanted to make visually. It was also refreshing to work in my own country. I realised my work has so much more significance working in my own country as an artist. There is plenty to explore there but I wish to work for bigger brands and with better budgets moving forward.

From the series  Fancy a Whim!?

From the series Fancy a Whim!?

Have you got any tips for gaining experience with shooting with models or on location, or even working with brands? Shoot shoot shoot! Write ideas down. Hustle hustle hustle! When you start out you have to make things happen on your own and then things will fall into place if you bring that sort of passion and energy into your work. One thing will lead to another.

I work a lot with instinct so the only thing I would say is follow your instinct. It’s a very hard profession to be in as you need to be extremely self motivated and have a lot of persistence and patience. I am actually incredibly impatient and want things to fall in place very fast but I'm learning to slow down and not rush into things too much as well.

From the series  Fancy a Whim!?

From the series Fancy a Whim!?


Join Photo Scratch on Monday 18th February 2019 for their next edition

Click here to book your FREE ticket.

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A night for new ideas, Photo Scratch is an opportunity for documentary photographers to understand how their work is perceived and gain valuable insight into how to take their work further with the benefit of other people’s outside eye. For spectators this is an opportunity to preview projects, offer feedback, and engage in conversations about photography.

The format of the night involves a group of six to eight photographers previewing a project in an incomplete state. These photographers are selected in advance based on informal applications. Each photographer is given a wall space to display their work in any way they see fit (rough prints, contact sheets, annotations, captions, text, projection etc.). The audience, comprised of other photographers, friends, people within the industry and anyone with an interest in documentary photography, are then welcome to discuss the work and leave written feedback for each project. This valuable written feedback is then kept by each photographer for future reference. The night is free for all to attend, but booking is required. There is a bar in the gallery.

Our first edition of 2019 will feature work-in-progress from:
Rita Alvarez www.tudelaphotography.com

Tee Byford www.tearlach.co.uk

Julie Meresse www.juliemeresse.com

Hassan Nezamian www.hassannezamian.com

Marie Smith www.marieesmith.com

Alexandra Waespi www.alexandrawaespi.com

Introducing Peak Imaging - film processing, digital printing, photobooks, and more.

 
 
 

Peak Imaging is an independent photographic laboratory and print company based in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. Vastly experienced in both traditional film and the digital arena, their dedicated workforce has an amazing, average service time of 22 years.

Working alongside some very famous household names across the UK and Europe and more recently the Far East, producing wall art products and prints for museums, boardrooms, homes and photographers in general, Peak Imaging’s reputation is well documented and long established. 

Co-director Cathrine Lee has seen the company adapt and re-shape to the ever changing marketplace. “Customer service and product involvement is key to our success and we firmly believe that time invested in project development and consultation is vital for end result satisfaction. Our clients usually know what they want to achieve but often, not how to achieve it or more commonly, what is possible. From straight reprints of digital media or film to large format displays on PVC and acrylic, we cover a vast array of display products and services, working to strict guidelines and tolerances”.

Processing film through C41, E6 and Black and White lines all day, 5 days a week, all machinery is the best dip and dunk technology for a scratch-free environment. Slide mounting and film scanning still play a big part in photographic projects whilst the emailing of images from film is becoming very popular too.

Cathrine continues “As a laboratory of some 43 years in the business, we have always invested heavily in new machinery and ideas and currently employ both photographic and giclee printing techniques. We find that both have a place in domestic and commercial display forums and that it is sometimes wise to allow the subject matter of a piece to dictate the media and print format. Metallic and high gloss papers are very popular at the moment but much of the traditional photographic work pieces still demand rag papers and fine art materials”.

Photobooks are currently a favourite format for family enjoyment and advertising and Peak Imaging’s LifeBook product comes in many shapes and sizes to suit the project in hand. From weddings and world trips to coffee table promotions and antique collections. All stories can be told and cherished in the pages of a “LifeBook”.  Explore the possibilities and creation software at peak-imaging.com.

10,000 sq. ft. of production space has been carefully designed to create efficient workflow whilst housing darkrooms, conference facilities and design studios.  All of this and full product display can be visited at the Holbrook Avenue site.


Find out more about Peak Imaging and what they do here. You can even give them a follow on Facebook or Twitter.

Ginnel Foto Fest 2019 - Submissions Open

Ginnel Foto Fest returns, 25th - 26th May 2019.

inrep.jpg

We accept photographs of digital and analogue source.

Our new 2019 call hopes to attract submissions that show a diverse interpretation of this years ‘IN REPEAT’ theme. Our feature photographers already lead the way in showing very different approaches and concepts. Be inspired and make use of the opportunity to be part of a unique community.

IN REPEAT is inspired by dealings with the past or engaging with timely matters. This could be relating to finding patterns in society that may have been experienced by previous generations in similar ways. Think of working with memories by looking back into ones personal life. It could as well be the work with found imagery or dealings with historic content. The opportunities are manifold and we will be interested in seeing your work.

The Ginnel Foto Fest is with its 13.5 sqm exhibition space the smallest Photo Festival we know of. With this in mind and a call for project based submissions we are looking for: 

5 finalists who will get their work published across our online channels. Winner and runner-up will see their work displayed during the 2019 Ginnel Foto Fest and take part in the group exhibition of the Ginnel Foto Community in June at the Frameworkshop & Gallery in Ipswich.

Submission Guidelines

Entry is free!

We will only accept entries according to these rules. Submissions to the Ginnel Awards have to be sent via email to ginnelfest@gmail.com and must state ‘Ginnel Awards 2019’ in the subject header.

Photographs must be current and shot no earlier than 2017. Photographs must respond to the festival theme ‘IN REPEAT’. The photographer submitting the work must own the copyright and all necessary releases to the image. Feature photographers of the 2019 Ginnel Foto Fest are not permitted to enter. Only one entry/person is allowed. Multiple entries will automatically disqualify all entries.

Don’t put any info in the text body of your email. Please read on for further details.

  • Your submission must have minimum of 4 and maximum of 8 images.

  • We need your entry as a pdf document attached to the email.

  • Each photo must be on a full page. No two photos on the same page

The last page/s must provide the following:

  • First Name, surname

  • Email address

  • Website url

  • Nationality

  • Address of residency

  • Project Title of the submitted series of images

For each image we need:

  • Image title, Image location, date taken

Additionally you have to add: 

  • Short description of the project (max 500 words)

  • Short bio (max 200 words)

If your entry is selected for the finals you have to provide high resolution jpg files within a week after being contacted. Not responding or a delayed respond may result in being disqualified. Compensation claims will not be accepted.

The finalists grant Ginnel Foto Fest and associated partners of the 2019 Ginnel Foto Fest to use their images for marketing and other promotional purposes. Image credit will be given and the copyright remains with the owner. Curational decisions for the Ginnel Foto Fest and/or the Gallery Exhibition may not include all images of the submitted work. The curator’s decision is final. All work will be printed from the files provided and framed by the Ginnel Foto Community free of charge for the participant. All exhibited work remains in the archive of the Ginnel Foto Community.

The decision of the jury for the 2019 Calling Photographers is final.

Closing date for entries: 01 March 2019 at 23.59 BST

A visual response to Brexit - the 3rd edition of PGZ

Submissions are now open to the third edition of PGZ. In this Brexit themed issue, photographers will reflect upon the current UK climate amidst our recent decision to leave the European Union.

We are looking for single images, bodies of work, and written pieces around the topic. Whether positive or negative, we are hopeful we can collate a reflection of the UK at this important, but also quite uncertain time. We’ve all felt the impact and our futures remain unpredictable. We are all in a huge state of change.

Previous editions of PGZ have been printed and saddle stitched, and we’ve sent these out to big names in the industry. This time around we’re creating a downloadable zine which we are hopeful can reach a wider audience. This also means we can include more photographers and spend less time on print quality and more time on promotion.

We’re excited to see where this project will lead.


We will also be selecting work from submissions received for website content based around this theme. If you’d like to be considered for website content only and not this edition of PGZ please state this in your email. There is no fee for website only content.

Submission guidelines

  • Submissions are free and open to photography graduates from UK courses only. No specific graduation year

  • A number of graduates will be selected from submissions received and will need to pay a small fee of £15 each

  • A maximum of 10 images need to be sent alongside your series title, website link, social media handles, and where you studied

Winning photographers: please note that not all 10 of your images will be selected, we will edit them down so if you have any preferences please state these in your initial email.

Selected images will be curated at the discretion of Photograd.

Submissions need to be sent to photogradpgz@gmail.com only.

Supporters

We’ve asked a number of industry professionals to come on board with this project and have listed a few names below. You might have the opportunity to be interviewed by one of these people for PGZ or your work may be selected because of them.

  • Chloe Juno - Brighton based photographer and creative consultant. Current long term photo project Someones Rubbish.

  • Joanne Coates - Photographer and founder of Lens Think; A social enterprise for equality in art with bi-monthly socials to meet, work, generate ideas, & develop arts in the North.

  • Hanna-Katrina Jedrosz - Documentary photographer and founder of Photo Scratch; an opportunity for documentary photographers to understand how their work is perceived and gain valuable insight into how to take their work further with the benefit of other people’s outside eye.

  • Tom Coleman - London based photographer, curator and producer, and founder of Unveil’d; commissioning, producing and promoting contemporary photography.

  • Alex Hewitt and Pauline Jérémie - The team behind Findr; supporting photographers and finding them work. They simplify the search and booking process of photographers for work by giving direct access through their platform.

  • Alex Ingram - University of the West of England, Bristol graduate and now London based freelance photographer. Alex’s work has been featured in various magazines and exhibitions across the UK, as well as having recently published his second book, David’s House.

…and more!

Selected

Those selected graduates for this edition of PGZ will:

  • Receive a free download of this issue

  • Receive a 50% off code to share with a friend or family member to download their own copy from the Photograd Shop

  • Be signed up to receive future opportunity emails from Photograd

  • Be part of the Photograd community with a copy of our logo for your site

DEADLINE

Midnight Monday 4th March 2019.

For those selected the deadline to then pay by will be Wednesday 13th March.


We will be creating a similar zine based around this theme later in the year so if you have work in progress which won’t make the deadline this time around, save it for our next submission process.

Introducing Fable & Folk

There seems to be a running theme in our recent blog posts here at Photograd as we introduce you to some other online communities and networks.
In this blog post we introduce you to Fable & Folk, an independent platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire.

We think Charlotte’s answers are really inspiring so we hope you enjoy a read through them.

If you have something to share or talk about on the blog, get in touch!

Kate Walker,  A Day Away From the Farm , 2018

Kate Walker, A Day Away From the Farm, 2018

Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Charlotte and I’m a recent photography graduate. I wouldn’t say I have a motto, but one of my favourite quotes is “comparison is the thief of joy”. I think this applies so much within the photographic community - I spent years looking at other people’s work and thinking it was so much better than my own. Once I learnt to value my own work and not compare myself to others, I produced my best photography to date.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I was born in Manchester but grew up in a small village in North Lincolnshire. I started studying photography at A Level then moved to Cheltenham to study Editorial & Advertising Photography at The University of Gloucestershire. I graduated in November and recently got a job as a Content Creation Manager at an independent company specialising in homeware and DIY products. I plan on travelling in a couple of years time and would like to start my own photobook business in the future.

Charlotte Colenutt,  Soul Mate , 2018

Charlotte Colenutt, Soul Mate, 2018

What's your favourite style of photography? I wouldn’t say I have a favourite genre of photography, I love and appreciate photographs that tell a story or photographs that have thought and craftsmanship behind them. My specialisation, however, is documentary photography because I love to talk to people. I love to dedicate time to speaking to someone, finding out their story and trying to capture that. Moreover, I love finding out the story behind an interesting place and trying to document every inch of it to best tell it’s story to others.

Who or what motivates you? I have been passionate about photography for years now. I guess what motivates me to photograph is I feel a need to tell people’s stories and share them. I feel motivated by what’s going on in the world and by finding stories I haven’t seen/heard told before. I also surround myself with other photography - photobooks, magazines, social media accounts, organisations and blogs - to inspire me and keep me constantly thinking of new ideas.

Can you tell us what Fable & Folk is? Fable & Folk is an online platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire others. Directed at young or aspiring photographers, it’s a space I curate and share narratives and photo-stories. I want to develop Fable & Folk into more than just a blog sharing others work but an online hub - full of information from fellow budding photographers and the professionals whilst keeping my audience updated with current affairs in the photographic world.

Gweniver Exton,  Spiritual Spaces , 2018

Gweniver Exton, Spiritual Spaces, 2018

Tell us about the team behind Fable & Folk. There isn’t really a team at Fable & Folk, it’s mostly just me. I tend to be involved in every step of the process from recruiting a photographer to feature to the end blog post and sharing that on social media. I don’t feel I would be 100% truthful though if I said I did everything. Sometimes, my partner Adam Elliott and a few great friends from university, particularly Megan Bendall, are a great assistance in helping me find new and exciting work. It’s difficult running the operation mostly on my own but I consider it my baby and even if I had a full team of amazing staff, I’d still want to be involved in everything.

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fable & Folk? Fable & Folk started when I was studying at university and couldn’t decide what I wanted to do for a career - all I knew was that I love photobooks. I love designing them, constructing them and collecting them. Eventually my tutor Grant Scott and I decided the best way for me to pursue a career in photobooks would be for me to start my own publishing company. To build an audience, you first need to create a blog that naturally attracts an audience that will eventually move from the blog, to your company. I can’t thank Grant and my university peers enough for their support of Fable & Folk and if you haven’t already, I recommend listing to Grant’s podcast series ‘A Photographic Life’.

Jordan Turnbull,  A Rock and a Hard Place , 2018

Jordan Turnbull, A Rock and a Hard Place, 2018

What is Fable & Folk's biggest achievement to date? I’ve never been one to keep track of numbers or views. I know it sounds cheesy but I would say my biggest achievement is having had the chance to be in contact with so many fantastic photographers and to have built a hub of Fable & Folk support on Twitter. I feel so proud of where Fable & Folk is, who our biggest supporters are and most importantly, the list of photographers I get to consider friends and mentors.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? We always love being contacted by photographers! If you’re interested in submitting to Fable & Folk, visit our ‘Contact’ page for more details. We don’t have specifics on what the series should necessarily be or look like, we only ask you send us a strong narrative. THAT’S IT. That’s not to say we accept all work but we always want to offer something - whether it’s a feature on the blog or advice on how to develop the work to eventually get it featured. We also love getting constructive criticism and positive feedback from our audience on F&F so please feel free to message us or drop us an email.

Adam Elliott,  For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal , 2018

Adam Elliott, For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal, 2018

Give one tip to new photography graduates. If I could give one tip to new photography graduates I would stress the importance of networking - whether it’s through social media or attending events, it’s vital to make contact with other photographers. Networking so much during my course has meant that since leaving university, and trying to grow Fable & Folk, I have had endless support and mentorship from so many different photographers and influencers within the community - special thanks to Iain Sarjeant for giving me heaps of advice when the blog first started and to Chloe Juno for motivating me and offering so much help. In addition, I think it’s even more helpful if you’re struggling mentally, feeling overwhelmed or lost, to talk to someone in the same boat so don’t be afraid to reach out!

What does 2019 have in store for Fable & Folk? I don’t want to give too much away but I’m hoping 2019 will be a game changer for Fable & Folk. I really want to get more interviews on the blog and I’d like to try and get a new feature on the site where I share exhibitions, events and workshops for people to attend. I’d also potentially like to rebrand - new website, new logo - so the brand evolves with the work and the audience. I hope we can really develop into a fully realised online platform featuring lots of different important yet inspirational content for budding photographers/ photography enthusiasts.