Highly commended zine submissions - 2018 photography graduates

The first edition of Photograd's zine, PGZ129, was a great success and so was our recent call for work aimed at 2018 photography graduates. With the support of Spectrum Photographic we decided to combine these two recent successful projects and create the second edition of PGZ filled with work from new graduates. You can read more about PGZ2018 here.

We present you here with 8 highly commended 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses who submitted to the call for work for PGZ2018 but unfortunately didn't make the final 11. Please click each image to read about the work.

 Daniella Gott,  Joan

Daniella Gott, Joan

 Petar Petrov,  Giants above The Cherries

Petar Petrov, Giants above The Cherries

 Grace Thomas,  It's All Make-Believe

Grace Thomas, It's All Make-Believe

 Hannah Detnon,  Chaos Cooking

Hannah Detnon, Chaos Cooking

 Molly Budd,  The Chair Is Touching the Wall

Molly Budd, The Chair Is Touching the Wall

 Chloe Caulfield,  Healing Spaces

Chloe Caulfield, Healing Spaces

 Benedikte Bergh Iversen,  Malstrøm

Benedikte Bergh Iversen, Malstrøm

 Paula Tollett,  Inbetween

Paula Tollett, Inbetween

PGZ2018 | The second edition of Photograd's zine

Introducing the second edition of Photograd's zine, PGZ2018 | Celebrating those photographers who are graduating university this year from UK based courses. Available to purchase in the Photograd online shop, PGZ2018 praises brand new photographic talent.

This year we are promoting 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses in various ways; interviews, sharing of work, and aiming to reach a much wider audience. With support from Spectrum Photographic on this particular project we have been able to showcase new graduates through the second edition of PGZ. Here we introduce you to PGZ2018.

This summer we received entries from new photography graduates and we're celebrating this talent through the second edition of PGZ. PGZ2018 showcases work from 11 photographers from various universities across the UK including University of the Arts London, University of Salford, and The University of the West of England.

From calling for work, receiving more submissions than ever before, to the final judging process with the help of Hazel Watts of Spectrum Photographic, we have been presented with a much wider variety of photography that's new to the scene this year. We're starting to notice trends in research, subject matter, and outcome, and we're excited to bring you an array of this to you through PGZ2018.

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 Natalie Paetzold and the series  Finding the Void

Natalie Paetzold and the series Finding the Void

 Jay Goodsell and the series  Portus Dubris

Jay Goodsell and the series Portus Dubris

University of the Arts London graduate Joanna Wierzbicka presents her series The Point Where We Meet which we've also featured as the cover image.

"The point where we meet is a surface forming a common line between two bodies, spaces, layers. Fashion becomes the translation of persona, appears as a boundary between us and others, almost like a mask or a second skin. It makes us feel comfortable and confident, allows to create the image of the self and coincide with others.
Garments perform the function of masking and wrapping - they deform and deconstruct the human form, but also in some cases fail and reveal the natural shape of the body, its pure, naked form. They conceal and reveal at the same time, causing the coexistence between absence and presence allowing surfaces to meet.
Within this series, there are also elements of an embodiment, disembodiment, and the awareness of bodily sensations achieved through the tactility of clothing."

 Images from the series  The Point Where We Meet  by Joanna Wierzbicka

Images from the series The Point Where We Meet by Joanna Wierzbicka

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MFA Photography graduate from the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Natalie Paetzold introduces us to Finding the Void.

"Finding the Void is rooted in the desire to free one‘s head from one’s thoughts through the rhythm of walking within a nature setting. Placing one step in front of another helps to clear one‘s mind due to the ongoing act of repetition. The body of work is an investigation into meditation and landscape. Through the use of digitally reconstructed photography the work explores an immersion into both land and seascapes, creating a conscious state of being. Both surroundings allow contemplation through different visual experiences; being an active practitioner or being an observer. The ambiguous spheres create an awareness of the indexical nature of the photograph and blend the past, present and future together. Through walking, wandering, thinking and looking these strikingly coloured images reflect on ideas of phenomenology and perception, whilst also considering the possibilities of parallel worlds."

 
 Image from the series  Finding the Void  by Natalie Paetzold

Image from the series Finding the Void by Natalie Paetzold

 

University of East London graduate Jay Goodsell presents his series Portus Dubris.

"Portus Dubris which derives from the towns roman beginnings, is a body of work that explores Dovers landscapes, not only is it undergoing major structural changes, the town still hangs within the unknown when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s often a forgotton place, and recently receiving a lot of negative press. The small but vital town to the country was voted at number one as the ‘worst place to live within the UK’. Dover is the entry point for many visiting guests from the continent, which left the question, what is so bad about the town to be voted number one?"

 Images from the series  Portus Dubris  by Jay Goodsell

Images from the series Portus Dubris by Jay Goodsell

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PGZ2018 is available to buy here in the Photograd Shop.

Featuring 2018 photography graduates

New Photograd content | Supporting 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses.

This summer Photograd are supporting a number of 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses through interviews, sharing of work, and promotion to a much wider audience. Selected from a recent call for work across social media were, in total, 12 new graduates who we are sharing the work of. We're appreciating some noticeable trends in photography over the last couple of years and new content on the Photograd platform brings you still life, responses to current affairs, exploration of family heritage, and industrial effects upon the landscape.


University of the West of England graduate Tom Roche presents his series Black Blood on the Photograd Spotlight in which he explores his own Romany Gypsy heritage through stories and speculation. We asked Tom about his university experience, his use of photography to find a sense of 'home', and his future plans, in particular how he will make Black Blood interestingly presented on the web.

The documentary collection of archival images, and both medium and large format prints, presented together provoke some interesting thoughts about family, heritage, and the future. 

 Images from the series  Black Blood  by Tom Roche

Images from the series Black Blood by Tom Roche

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We selected Norwich University of the Arts graduate Holly Farndell to takeover the Photograd Instagram at the end of July with her documentary work.

"Golden Promise was created from Autumn through to Spring as a documentation of light and the changing of seasons. With a short escape from grey old England to sun-washed Spain, it is an observation of my experience with seasonal affective disorder and coping with the light and darkness of life."

You can follow along to find out more about Holly and her work from Sunday 29th July - Saturday 4th August.

 Images from the series  Golden Promise  by Holly Farndell

Images from the series Golden Promise by Holly Farndell

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Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi presents us with her series SATIS on the Photograd Spotlight. In here interview, Caterina presents her still life images and accompanying video. Caterina takes inspiration from traditional still life paintings and intends to educate the viewer on certain current affairs. Each of her images are uniquely titled in Latin to give everybody the opportunity to decipher subject matter.

  ABORTUS IURA  from the series  SATIS  by Falmouth University graduate  Caterina Lombardi

ABORTUS IURA from the series SATIS by Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi

  OBSTETRICANTE VIOLENTIAM  from the series  SATIS  by Falmouth University graduate  Caterina Lombardi

OBSTETRICANTE VIOLENTIAM from the series SATIS by Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi

 

Nine highly commended 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses were also selected from this call for work to be represented on the Photograd blog. These bodies of work stood out to us for many reasons and we took this opportunity to share them.

  Miguel Proença ,  The Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

Miguel ProençaThe Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

  Luke Hurlock ,  Tokamak Fusion

Luke HurlockTokamak Fusion

  Chiara Avagliano ,  Val Paradiso

Chiara AvaglianoVal Paradiso

University of Westminster graduate Luke Hurlock presents Tokamak Fusion which documents the current state of advancements in the field of nuclear fusion research. The word Tokamak comes from the Russian Toroidalnaya Kamera I Magnitnaya Katushka (Toroidal Chamber and Magnetic Coil) an is in reference to the fusion devices used by the leading fusion experiments. The images in this project aim to both intrigue and inform the viewer on the progress of a future technology that promises to solve one of humanity’s biggest problems, clean renewable energy production.

 

London College of Communication graduate Chiara Avagliano explores the places she grew up in Val Paradiso. "

The mountain scenery blends with the hills of the countryside colliding in a space inhabited by childhood memories, magical encounters, teenage adventures, mystical experiences, idealised love and a magical bond between girls that echoes ancient rituals and witchcraft. 

The fictional documentary work is a coming of age tale, retold from different points of view. 

Personal experiences are narrated and transformed, almost becoming legends whispered softly, from mouth to mouth, from me to my half-sister and her girlfriends."

The Space In Between - A Solo Exhibition by Callum Beaney

Nottingham Trent University graduate Callum Beaney’s first solo exhibition will be opening at Nottingham’s Lakeside Arts from September 15th to October 28th. He is winner of the Genesis Imaging Bursary Award 2017.

The exhibition will present new work made in the forests and tracks surrounding his home, showing two different perspectives on these same places; one a development of his previous work taking form in folded scrolls, and the other an installation of work made at night exploring the limits of human and mechanical perception.

 
 From the Lakeside Arts Sep - Nov 18 brochure

From the Lakeside Arts Sep - Nov 18 brochure

 

Building upon my established practice, The Space In Between is a refinement of my attention towards the production of artist books, and towards the forests and their peripheries.

Though at a distance appearing still, as though held from time, the forest’s inhabitants experience perpetual, cycling change. Reflecting aspects of one another in these spaces, these phenomena define themselves in their coexistence, their continuity, these shifting moments revealing their shared aspects - and our place in relation to them. Concerned with this interconnectedness, this transience, and the experience of time and space within these places, I envisage these connections in the form of orihon - folded scrolls.

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 Images from the series  The Space In Between

Images from the series The Space In Between

No Flashlight/Sensor Burnout explores these same spaces on the night following a snowstorm. Having forgotten my torch, snow became my guide home, all above ground indiscernible. As clouds blanketed, the eyes’ internal processes revealed themselves; replacing absolute darkness with nonexistent, shifting forms.

The stillness of these places, within which my practice has resided for several years, had suddenly become threatening, space and distance pulling upon one another. Manipulating and exacerbating traces of the residual heat signature of my camera’s sensor, this phenomenon would find a digital analogon, manifesting as simulated vision too began to fail.

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 Images from the series  No Flashlight/Sensor Burnout

Images from the series No Flashlight/Sensor Burnout

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Chris Mear. Five Years: A Reciprocal Tribute

Legacy: A Reciprocal Tribute is an artwork conceived by Patricia Swannell in response to The Woodland Trusts flagship Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee. Patricia’s artwork takes the form of a plinth, inviting local families to make an annual family photograph against the backdrop of the developing trees. Charting both the changes in their family and the changes in the landscape they collectively call home. Five years ago Staffordshire University graduate Chris Mear was commissioned to photograph this selected family in the same spot in Leicestershire each year. 2018 marks Chris's 5th year as the commissioned photographer.


I could agrue that 2014 was my most succesful year to date. I became an artist in residence, I published my first book and I landed a modest succession of commissions which just about saw me through the remainder of the year. It was, finally, the year that I could actually defend the claim that I was a “photographer” - a claim which I have to admit I’ve, more often than not, not had the confidence to defend. But when it all starts winding down and I’m sat in a tree looking back at my brief holiday on earth, I will most probably remember the year 2014 for one thing above all others - a commission that goes by the name of Legacy: A Reciprocal Tribute. A commission that, all being well, will see me well into what I’m told they used to call “retirement age”.

The London based, Canadian born artist, Patricia Swannell was asked to come up with a location based artwork for the Woodland Trust’s flagship commemoration of the Queen’s diamond jubilee in 2012 - that’s 60 years on the old thrown. Interestingly, what Patricia devised was a “photo point” in a carefully selected location within the wood - selected to compose people, trees and landscape. 

The idea was, to me at least, both beautiful, poigniant and simple. To chart the growth of yourself alongside the development of your family the woodland and the wider landscape.

Patricia also visited the woodland site in the early days of it’s post-industrial transition and collected 60 native plants and wildflowers from which she made 60 etchings to make up a permanent exhibition - which moves to a new home this autumn. Each year one of these etchings will be replaced by my portrait of the Martinson family, a local family who live just a pleasent evenings stroll away from the wood.

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This Sunday evening will be the fifth exposure, the fifth year. And so far each time I have made that walk to the photo point I have been unable to prevent my mind from thinking to the future; what will this all be like in 60 years time? This year however, I intend to try extra hard to not venture though my mind in some ludicrous attempt to construct an imaginary future. My rabbit of almost seven years died this week and I hope to pay respect to my friend, my best friend, and teacher by beginning to practice his most important teaching; Life Is Now.

So I will experience the woodland for what it is, a wild place where the two Martinson boys are growing faster than the trees. A place of peace and natural unity which leaves you feeling a sense of hope and optimism in a world dominated by a species that all to often seems intent on losing its remarkable mind.

How lucky I am, to have been in such a right place, at such a right time to land a photography gig like this.

Instagram Takeover winning graduate - Holly Farndell

We recently created a call for work specifically for those students graduating this year with the aim of rewarding a number of them with opportunities to be represented by Photograd. You can see our interview with University of the West of England graduate Tom Roche here, and our 9 highly commended graduates here. We're continuing to support 2018 graduates with a brand new edition of PGZ which is coming soon!

Here we present you a few images from Norwich University of the Arts graduate Holly Farndell who we selected from the submissions we received to takeover our Instagram. You can follow along to find out more about Holly and her work from Sunday 29th July - Saturday 4th August.


Golden Promise was created from Autumn through to Spring as a documentation of light and the changing of seasons. With a short escape from grey old England to sun-washed Spain, it is an observation of my experience with seasonal affective disorder and coping with the light and darkness of life.

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 All images from the series  Golden Promise

All images from the series Golden Promise

Photohastings exhibition opportunity

Photohastings in collaboration with Brighton Photo Fringe open submissions to 'Not the Final Major Project' to recent photography graduates.

Be in with the chance of exhibiting at Hastings Arts Forum 2nd - 18th October.

Submissions close Friday 20th July.

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Contact Sarah French with enquiries.

Highly commended 2018 photography graduates

We recently created a call for work specifically for those students graduating this year with the aim of rewarding a number of them with opportunities to be represented by Photograd. You can see the full list of results here.

Here we present you with 9 highly commended 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses. Please click each image to read about the work.

 
 Luke Hurlock,  Tokamak Fusion

Luke Hurlock, Tokamak Fusion

 Jae Storer,  Riders of The City

Jae Storer, Riders of The City

 Chiara Avagliano,  Val Paradiso

Chiara Avagliano, Val Paradiso

 Laura Dow,  Flock

Laura Dow, Flock

 Emma Stevenson,  Altered Lands

Emma Stevenson, Altered Lands

 Paige Middleton,  Coastal Contamination

Paige Middleton, Coastal Contamination

 Miguel Proença,  The Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

Miguel Proença, The Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

 Stefania Kossakowska,  Her Name Is Polonia

Stefania Kossakowska, Her Name Is Polonia

 Hannah Morgan,  Precious Fragments

Hannah Morgan, Precious Fragments

Photograd's Online Gallery

Officially launching on Friday 14th September 2018.

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  • Submissions via email only to photogradonlinegallery@gmail.com
  • Open to photography students and graduates from UK based university courses only. No exceptions.
  • A maximum of 10 JPG images at 96dpi and 12 inches on the longest side.
  • A series description of no more than 150 words should be supplied.
  • A website link and relevant social media handles should be included, alongside university and graduation year.
  • We ask that a small donation is made if images are selected for our online gallery to support the Photograd platform in moving forward.

For further terms and conditions to agree to before submitting please click here.

 

We are hopeful that in the future we will be able to invite guest curators to select work and for industry professionals to take a look at our online exhibitions. We may even run the occasional themed call out and some of the work might even make it to print for physical exhibitions, who knows. We are excited for what our new online gallery could turn into.

Supporting 2018 photography graduates - call out results

We're continuously seeking brand new talent here at Photograd and so of course the Summer months are our favourite time of year - it's degree show season!


We recently created a call for work specifically for those students graduating this year with the aim of rewarding a number of them with opportunities to be represented by Photograd.

The work we received was brilliant and the judging process was a tough one, but finally, the results are in..

The two 2018 photography graduates we are rewarding with a Spotlight feature are

  • Tom Roche and the series Black Blood - University of the West of England
  • Caterina Lombardi and the series SATIS - Falmouth University

The selected 2018 photography graduate we are rewarding with an Instagram Takeover is

  • Holly Farndell with the series Golden Promise - Norwich University of the Arts

The highly commended 2018 photography graduates who will appear on the Photograd blog are

  • Laura Dow with the series Flock - The University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh College of Art) 
  • Luke Hurlock with the series Tokamak Fusion - University of Westminster
  • Chiara Avagliano with the series Val Paradiso - London College of Communication
  • Jae Storer with the series Riders of The City - University of Suffolk
  • Hannah Morgan with the series Precious Fragments - Brighton University
  • Stefania Kossakowska with the series Her Name Is Polonia - University of South Wales
  • Emma Stevenson with the series Altered Lands - University of Westminster
  • Paige Middleton with the series Coastal Contamination - Coventry University
  • Miguel Proença with the series The Buzzer (ZhUOZ) - University of South Wales
 
 Image from the series  Black Blood  by University of the West of England graduate    Tom Roche

Image from the series Black Blood by University of the West of England graduate Tom Roche

 
 
  PUER NUPTAE  from the series  SATIS  by Falmouth University graduate  Caterina Lombardi

PUER NUPTAE from the series SATIS by Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi

 

Dates for the release of interviews and blog posts are as follows

  • Spotlight interview with Tom Roche - Friday 29th June
  • Highly commended blog posts - Friday 6th July
  • Spotlight interview with Caterina Lombardi - Friday 27th July
  • Instagram Takeover by Holly Farndell - Sunday 29th July - Saturday 4th August

Introducing Loupe Magazine

Loupe, a free magazine featuring a diverse selection of contemporary photography. Issue 7 in stockists now - find out more here.

 
 

Who are you, what's your motto? I’m Luke Archer, editor / founder of Loupe magazine and a photographer in a very loose sense of the word!

I think you can’t go wrong with ‘treat others how you would expect to be treated’ as a motto, it certainly informs my approach to life and Loupe. Funnily enough I think the original quote comes from the book of Luke!

Have you studied photography? What are your thoughts? I studied my BA at UWE and I’m currently studying for my MA at AUB. Many of the Loupe team are recent grads. The magazine goes out to a lot of universities and we do try and feature student work so photography education is an area of interest for us!

There are certain constraints that academia puts on courses to make them a ‘degree’ that I don’t always think are essential for photography. Personally, I think the written elements of courses should be reduced and more emphasis should be put on making sure everyone is technically competent and developing career paths for students. However, photography is a tricky subject to teach, courses tend to be broad and with student dedication so varied it is hard to create a program that will be a perfect fit for each student.

For me studying the BA had a massive impact, the difference in the standard of my work from when I started my BA and finished was huge, I just wish I had spent less time on my dissertation and more time making contacts! That’s very much how I have tried to approach the MA.

I also do worry for current BA students that the fees are incredibly high. I think universities should be covering the cost of London degree shows and more competitions should be free or have low entry cost for students, that’s the feedback we get from our student readers.

What's your favourite style of photography? With Loupe we are trying to show the diversity of photography, how the medium can encompass such a breadth of approaches, so I hope my own taste is as varied I think it is!

That being said, I am a sucker for documentary work where a photographer is able to tell a story through portrait, landscape and detail shots. I’m also becoming very interested in how photographers are incorporating text and interviews into their work to tell a fuller story, currently I’ve been really inspired by the work of Lauren Greenfield and Mahtab Hussain.

Can you tell us what Loupe Magazine is? Loupe is a free photography magazine distributed across the UK. We are stocked at a lot of photography specific locations so I think all our readers are as passionate about photography as we are! As previously mentioned we try and feature a diverse selection of inspiring work.

We launched Issue 1 in May 2016 and have been publishing on a triannual basis ever since.

Who makes up the team behind the magazine? Currently we have designer and co-founder Alec Jackson, Leticia Batty who manages our distribution and Harry Flook who is editor of our web content.

We have a whole host of regular writers including Gemma Padley, Mischa Frankl-Duval, Grace Benton, Alex Ingram and Rosie Wadey, alongside some new recruits who are helping with our web content and will hopefully be writing in future issues. 

We also have Noah and Dan who are doing some research as part of work experience modules for their degrees.

Most of the guys are trying to balance the mag with their own photography / studies and paid work so I try not to overload everyone with tasks. Although you would have to ask them if that’s working out or not!

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Loupe Magazine? Like others we aim to promote new talent but I hope we go the extra mile by sending each issue directly to a lot of people in the photography industry for example: picture editors, curators, ad agency art buyers among many others.

I think that some titles put a deliberate distance between themselves and their readers to somehow inflate their own importance and we don’t want that with Loupe. We are trying to be as open and as approachable as possible. We respond to submissions and give advice when asked (if we can!) and I know from my own experience trying to promote work how much that means to people.

What is Loupe Magazine's biggest achievement to date? Reaching Issue 7! Independent publishing isn’t easy so it is often the small achievements that make it worthwhile. It’s been great to be able to be the first to publish someone’s work in print and then for the project to be picked up by other outlets, or just hearing that our readers appreciate what we do in terms of our general ethos and curation.

It was nice to be shortlisted for the 2017 Stack Awards, the ceremony was great because it was fun to be in a room with so many people obsessed with print.

What do you look for in a photographer who would like to get involved with what you do? We want to feature and promote work that hasn’t had a lot of coverage already. Having said that I am aware that as a free magazine our readership is very broad so I do try and consider that a body of work that might be well known in some areas of the community might be new to others.

For me the best work has a strong and concise concept that has been well executed. If there is a strong degree of originality in both those areas, then that’s the work that grabs my attention.

Curating the magazine is tricky because we have limited pages and that means we have to pass on featuring some very strong work. I feel bad rejecting work because it is not about the quality, it's more about maintaining the diversity of each issue. For example, we have so many people submit amazing documentary work, shot with available light on medium format film but we simply can’t publish it all.

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Try not to let rejection get you down! Although it is something that I still struggle with! There are so many rejections or simply not hearing back from magazines, competitions, potential employers, funding opportunities etc. If you can move forward and keep shooting and keep reaching out to people as opposed to dwelling on it that’s great. There are so many factors beyond the quality of your work that impact on those decisions that we should learn to not take it personally and keep on trucking!

What does the future hold for Loupe Magazine? A new website is top of my list! I want to make sure all the new content we are producing is as easy to access and enjoy as possible.

There are lot of ideas floating about and some vey blue sky thinking! Thankfully with more people helping I hope we can do even more to get to know our readers. A launch event or exhibition for each issue is something we couldn’t do before but hopefully we can put one on for the next issue and everyone can have a beer on us!

Outline: a Photographic Study of Boundaries

6 July 2018 18.00-22.00 (private view), 7 July 2018 10.30-17.30

Out of the Brew arts cafe (downstairs), 306 New Cross Road, London, SE14 6AF

Rachel E Joy Stanley, Jeremy Stokes, Edward Green, Louise Astbury

Facebook event

Outline-Poster.jpg

Outline is a photographic exhibition featuring work which responds to the notion of everyday boundaries. Four emerging London-based photographers present images which grapple with ideas of control, confines of both an internal and physical nature, and the space between image-maker and viewer. How are our daily actions trivially controlled and how can we use the camera to come to terms with this? How do we internalise rules and how do they affect our photographic practice? The exhibition explores how an awareness of such limitations can lead to liberation from them.

The work will show in the downstairs gallery space at Out of the Brew Arts Cafe in New Cross. The exhibition will open with a private view on Friday 6 July from 18.00-22.00 (all welcome) and is open all day on Saturday 7th between 10.30-17.30.


Rachel E Joy Stanley is a fine-art photographer based in London and the curator of Outline. Her work is concerned with spaces and how we construct, occupy and engage with them. Largely observational, subtly critical and inherently concerned with form and function, Rachel's photographs attempt to organise and make sense of contemporary life, asking questions about power, ownership and the balance between natural and human worlds. rachelstanley.co.uk | @r.ejs

 
 Image by Rachel E Joy Stanley

Image by Rachel E Joy Stanley

 

Jeremy Stokes is a photographer who uses the medium of the camera to reflect and capture a visual poetic tapestry. A tapestry of flux, of the light and the dark, of the beauty, and the truth of being. A spiritual pilgrimage of one’s own self, for the souls enrichment towards the light and divine. Photography: meaning from Ancient Greek — the study of light. Let there be light. jeremyjstokes.wordpress.com | @jeremy_john_stokes

 Image by Jeremy Stokes

Image by Jeremy Stokes

Edward Green’s socially conscious work, which celebrates banal, beautiful and surreal aspects of public life, has been exhibited in galleries across the capital. In September 2017, he released his debut photo book Never Mind. The book captures the prevailing (un)social behaviour of the city and the weakening affect it can have on the individuals who inhabit it. More recently, Edward’s work has been concerned with understanding identity politics, and a young generation besotted with nostalgia and myth. edwardjuliangreen.tumblr.com | @nedgreen

 
 Image by Edward Green

Image by Edward Green

 

Louise Astbury is a writer, photographer and film-maker who is interested in the camera’s ability to navigate the elusive terrain between one’s internal spaces and one’s surroundings. She likens the act of taking a photograph to diving underwater: ‘normal rules no longer apply as you don’t need to breathe because nothing except the immediate image exists’. Her images capture moments of reverie, stillness and reveal the transformative effect light has on everyday scenes. She focuses on these pauses between points of action in her writing and her visual work. flickr.com/photos/128448543@N08 | @lou_moon

 Image by Louise Astbury

Image by Louise Astbury


For further information and images please contact Rachel E Joy Stanley at rachelstanley@live.com. For venue information please visit outofthebrewcafe.com or call 020 8265 6740.

Image credit: Louise Astbury

Lens Think Yorkshire Summer Social Hebden Bridge

A social to support creative talent across Yorkshire

L E N S T H I N K Y O R K S H I R E Y A N P R E S T O N

Saturday June 23rd will see the Lens Think summer social and we are going out West, to West Yorkshire that is. We are a bi-monthly social in Yorkshire to meet, share work, ideas, & develop photography in the North. The day will be an informal meet up, a chance to preview Yan Preston’s work ‘Forest’ in a private exhibition tour and book signing in the unique location of 19th century Gibson Mill at Hardcastle Crags. Not only all of that but we also have a National trust one hour tour of the woodland. Come along, have a chat, meet other photographers in the area and hear from Yan Preston about her new body of work. So join us, with other like-minded photographers and creatives. Feel free to bring along friends, this event is family friendly.

The social takes place at Gibson Mill, Hollin Hall, Crimsworth Dean, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, HX7 7AP – and you’re invited to come and take a look at Yan Preston’s work in the heart of the woodland.

Yan Wang Preston is a British-Chinese artist interested in how landscape photography can reveal the hidden complexities behind the surface of physical landscapes. Her major projects include Mother River (2010-14) and Forest (2010-17). Forest won 1st Prize at the 2017 Syngenta Photography Award and monographs of both major works are being published by Hatje Cantz this year.

AS ALWAYS ALL WELCOME!

Contact: Jo Coates | T. 075 33 92 56 38 | e. hello@joannecoates.co.uk | June 23rd 2018| Doors Open 11:00am | Event finishes 5:00pm | Gibson Mill | Hardcastle Crags | Hebden Bridge | HX7 7AP


Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/281527135607690/
Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/633952096937754/
Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/lensthinkyorkshire/
Yan Wang Preston: http://www.yanwangpreston.com/