PGZ2018 | The second edition of Photograd's zine

Introducing the second edition of Photograd's zine, PGZ2018 | Celebrating those photographers who are graduating university this year from UK based courses. Available to purchase in the Photograd online shop, PGZ2018 praises brand new photographic talent.

This year we are promoting 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses in various ways; interviews, sharing of work, and aiming to reach a much wider audience. With support from Spectrum Photographic on this particular project we have been able to showcase new graduates through the second edition of PGZ. Here we introduce you to PGZ2018.

This summer we received entries from new photography graduates and we're celebrating this talent through the second edition of PGZ. PGZ2018 showcases work from 11 photographers from various universities across the UK including University of the Arts London, University of Salford, and The University of the West of England.

From calling for work, receiving more submissions than ever before, to the final judging process with the help of Hazel Watts of Spectrum Photographic, we have been presented with a much wider variety of photography that's new to the scene this year. We're starting to notice trends in research, subject matter, and outcome, and we're excited to bring you an array of this to you through PGZ2018.

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 Natalie Paetzold and the series  Finding the Void

Natalie Paetzold and the series Finding the Void

 Jay Goodsell and the series  Portus Dubris

Jay Goodsell and the series Portus Dubris

University of the Arts London graduate Joanna Wierzbicka presents her series The Point Where We Meet which we've also featured as the cover image.

"The point where we meet is a surface forming a common line between two bodies, spaces, layers. Fashion becomes the translation of persona, appears as a boundary between us and others, almost like a mask or a second skin. It makes us feel comfortable and confident, allows to create the image of the self and coincide with others.
Garments perform the function of masking and wrapping - they deform and deconstruct the human form, but also in some cases fail and reveal the natural shape of the body, its pure, naked form. They conceal and reveal at the same time, causing the coexistence between absence and presence allowing surfaces to meet.
Within this series, there are also elements of an embodiment, disembodiment, and the awareness of bodily sensations achieved through the tactility of clothing."

 Images from the series  The Point Where We Meet  by Joanna Wierzbicka

Images from the series The Point Where We Meet by Joanna Wierzbicka

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MFA Photography graduate from the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Natalie Paetzold introduces us to Finding the Void.

"Finding the Void is rooted in the desire to free one‘s head from one’s thoughts through the rhythm of walking within a nature setting. Placing one step in front of another helps to clear one‘s mind due to the ongoing act of repetition. The body of work is an investigation into meditation and landscape. Through the use of digitally reconstructed photography the work explores an immersion into both land and seascapes, creating a conscious state of being. Both surroundings allow contemplation through different visual experiences; being an active practitioner or being an observer. The ambiguous spheres create an awareness of the indexical nature of the photograph and blend the past, present and future together. Through walking, wandering, thinking and looking these strikingly coloured images reflect on ideas of phenomenology and perception, whilst also considering the possibilities of parallel worlds."

 
 Image from the series  Finding the Void  by Natalie Paetzold

Image from the series Finding the Void by Natalie Paetzold

 

University of East London graduate Jay Goodsell presents his series Portus Dubris.

"Portus Dubris which derives from the towns roman beginnings, is a body of work that explores Dovers landscapes, not only is it undergoing major structural changes, the town still hangs within the unknown when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s often a forgotton place, and recently receiving a lot of negative press. The small but vital town to the country was voted at number one as the ‘worst place to live within the UK’. Dover is the entry point for many visiting guests from the continent, which left the question, what is so bad about the town to be voted number one?"

 Images from the series  Portus Dubris  by Jay Goodsell

Images from the series Portus Dubris by Jay Goodsell

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PGZ2018 is available to buy here in the Photograd Shop.