An interview with Photograd Open 2018 exhibiting photographer Joel Biddle

Photography students at London Metropolitan University supported in the curation of our very first open exhibition and also selected a number of exhibiting photographers to interview about their work.

Here we have an interview with Joel Biddle.


Images from the series  Tectonic

Images from the series Tectonic

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Which photographers inspire you? I find my inspirations come from a mixture of landscape photographers and conceptual artists. The simplicity that some conceptual art can have has always been a draw for me, and a lot of the time that kind of work is more about only showing what is absolutely necessary and simplifying the message. I think one of my earliest influencers was Michael Kenna, whose work was a huge inspiration for me to create and experiment in the darkroom. The minimalist aesthetic and his approach to a mixture of geometric, manmade shapes and the shapes of the natural world has always been impactful. Hiroshi Sugimoto’s work was introduced to me just prior to university and has since been influencing my approach to my work as well. I think these photographer’s work changed my mindset about photography and made me take more time with my work. 

What do you find interesting in landscape photography? The possibilities involved in landscape photography are the reason I’m drawn to it, and the challenge of finding somewhere that connects with you is very rewarding. It can be a timeless for of photography, and you can create a landscape that can be very hard to place location wise, leading to an image that is very open to interpretation.  

From the series  Tectonic

From the series Tectonic

The juxtaposition between the smooth, changing shape and texture of water against ancient and seemingly permanent and harsh shapes of rock structures in the sea fascinates me and I try to highlight this. It’s almost an instinctual thing for me to photograph the landscape, and I sometimes don’t even see my work as landscape, as it can be broken down into a shapes and textures very easily and become abstract. 

Do you prefer using digital or analogue camera? Why? I’m in the process of moving to 100% analogue photography for a few reasons, one is the look of film grain has a lot of character to it, its quite organic. There is no instant gratification involved in analogue photography, which I find very motivational to get out and work more and concentrate on capturing what is in front of me. Film suits me very well as I found myself shooting a handful of images a day with a digital camera, which almost seemed like a waste of the potential of a camera that could easily shoot a thousand images a day, so it seemed obvious to move to a slower medium. The hand made element of a print produced in the darkroom is very appealing to me as well, and it’s a very expressive way of doing things. 

From the series  Tectonic

From the series Tectonic

What do you want to transmit with your photography? I want a calming sense of tranquillity to be found from my photography, and a sense of quiet that reflects the locations I photograph. There are no people in my work landscapes and very rarely any buildings, which leads to a sense of isolation, but its not a bleak isolation, its more of a break from chaos, and a choice rather than something forced.  

I don’t seek dramatic imagery when I choose my subject, and this is reflected in what I’m trying to say with my landscapes, and the feeling I hope to generate within the viewer.  

What did you try to achieve with this project? I started this project as a way of experimenting with the contrast between hard, rugged element, hence the use of the aggressive title ‘Tectonic’, and the flowing of glassy waters, with a focus on attempting to avoid any stereotypical landscape. This is why I was opposed to using vivid colour, avoided the golden hour and used telephoto lenses instead of wide-angle lenses and I find it very natural to photograph in portrait orientation, something that is somewhat ironic about my landscape photography. 

From the series  Tectonic

From the series Tectonic

I wanted to create something that had staying power, something that I wouldn’t get bored of looking at. A lot of the images I was taking before I wasn’t even printing, I was leaving them as digital files and looking at maybe once or twice. I had a different mindset when I started to create work for ‘Tectonic’, which was to work towards a body of work rather than a standalone image.  

Have you worked on other photographic project that are not landscape-based? I have been working on and am continuing to work on an astrophotography based project that involves photographing starlight with expired film that equals the age of the light of the star, for example I photographed Capella, a star that is 42 light years away with film that was produced 42 years ago. The idea that the film and the light were produced simultaneously but it takes decades for the light to reach the destination is fascinating and I hope to move the project on to use expired photographic paper to capture starlight and create one of a kind works, though this has many technical challenges. I have a broad interest in conceptual based photography and alternative processes, and may apply this to my landscape work at some point. 

Robert Darch 'The Moor' - pre-order now

Plymouth University graduate Robert Darch’s The Moor has been published by Another Place Press and is currently available to pre-order here.

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The Moor depicts a fictionalised dystopian future situated on the bleak moorland landscapes of Dartmoor. Drawing on childhood memories of Dartmoor alongside influences from contemporary culture, the narrative references local and universal mythology to give context but suggests something altogether more unknown. The realisation of this dystopian future is specifically in response to a perceived uncertainty of life in the modern world and a growing disengagement with humanitarian ideals. The Moor portrays an eerie world that shifts between large open vistas, dark forests, makeshift dwellings, uncanny visions and isolated figures.

The sense of an on-going narrative is reinforced by the reoccurrence of characters, often appearing on edge, in peril or distressed. The inherent wildness of the landscape heightens this fragile sense of existence, with the suggestion of an unseen presence adding to the isolation and tension.

The fiction is grounded within the landscapes of Dartmoor, using found locations instead of overt staging, artificial lights orconstructed sets. Shifting between pseudo documentary and constructed photography the Moor blurs that liminal space between fiction and reality.

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Images from  The Moor

Images from The Moor

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An interview with Photograd Open 2018 exhibiting photographer Kerry Curl

Photography students at London Metropolitan University supported in the curation of our very first open exhibition and also selected a number of exhibiting photographers to interview about their work.

Here we have an interview with Kerry Curl.


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Who inspired you as a fashion photographer? I’ve just always been interested in style and people. As a child I’d draw fashion designs and would have sketchbooks full of entire wardrobe ideas for films I’d seen. When I thought I was destined to spend my life in call centre type jobs I’d be reading art books as an escape. Tracey Emin’s My Bed, I discovered by looking through those Best Of…, A-Z of Artists type books and not only did I connect with it on first sight, in that way you’re sometimes just grabbed by a piece of music right away, I found the artist herself really interesting. Her story made me question my own. Not coming from a creative family/background I found those books a really accessible way to view and learn about the visual arts. I still do.

There wasn’t really a ‘fashion’ photographer, who made me think ‘I want to do that!’ but the photographer who gave me what I refer to as That Emin feeling was Daido Moriyama. I saw his work exhibited at the Tate in 2012 and that’s when I knew I needed to start thinking about what photography means to me, what do I want from it, how can I learn more?

Although fashion is within my work and most people do refer to me as a fashion photographer, I actually find myself wondering more and more what a fashion photographer is in 2018?  Where do I fit in? Photography genres can and do merge. I’ve really started to question fashion within my work. It is part of the imagery but it’s not the works sole purpose.

A by-product of the way I create is that I often find myself working with second hand clothing. I’ve been wearing second hand clothes since birth really, starting from necessity and then as I got older through choice. It’s not a new notion to me at all. However now this shopping approach, chimes with the increasing interest in the mainstream for sustainability in the fashion industry.

There’s growing desire for sustainable fashion as consumers begin to ask where their clothes come from. Almost paradoxically, the consumer demand for sustainability imposes a commercial imperative on this most egalitarian of impulses. These are interesting times to be contributing to fashion media.

Many people are more conscious than they once were of the social implications of what they buy and wear, rather than the sheer quantity of what they could consume or the status it would afford them. In a portfolio review I once talked about fashion in this way and was told that I wasn’t talking about the photography enough. However as a medium, photography for me is so intertwined with other art forms and our world around us, they exist together and that’s a key part of my work. Beyond fashion, I will always cite music and film as things which inspire me greatly. Inspiration is everywhere, that may be a cliché but it’s true.

What advice would you give someone starting off as a fashion photographer? My honest advice is to drop the focus of ‘fashion’ and just start photographing style/people/subject matters which interest you.

Be inquisitive, be genuinely inquisitive in knowing and learning more, look to different art forms for inspiration. Explore who has influenced your influences. If you are shooting fashion work because you feel you should or it’s a trend you think you must follow, then don’t. That applies across the board with all subject matters really. I wish I could remember who said to me  “show the work you want to talk about” - it’s such sound advice.

What camera do you use for your portraits? My go to camera is a Nikon D810, but I’ll also still use an array of 35mm SLR cameras sometimes and we’re not talking top of the range. I mostly use ones I’ve picked up second hand, some are what would probably be classed as an ‘entry level’ SLR. I’m always in charity and second hand shops looking for things I can use within my work so I pick up random cameras from time to time, even point and shoots. If I can make work with it then I’m interested. I shoot with ANY film I can afford. How amazing it was when Poundland used to sell 35mm film, sadly I think that’s passed but I still always look out for it.

I also really enjoy instant film, I found an old Instax Wide camera in a charity shop for £1.50 which it turned out was in full working order. Although I’ve used Polaroid cameras, Instax film is more friendly for my budget and I’ve also found the film to be more reliable but there is still that interestingly  unpredictable quality of tone and focus which can be bitter-sweet. I read an interview with Brian Eno on openculture.com where he said:
“The real hooks, the moments that we most connect with and return to again and again, are often happy accidents.”

Although he was referring to music, this also really connects to the visual arts for me. The different materials and approaches keep me inquisitive. People have expressed surprise because I like to work with both digital and film but I just don’t feel the need to be exclusively one or the other right now.  I learned photography on film - before digital was a thing. I just like cameras really, not from a techno-geek sense, just as a physical object that I can create imagery with.

Where did you study? I did my BA (Hons) Photography at Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) , graduating with a 1st in 2017. I was thirty seven when I started my degree, although during my twenties and thirties I was lucky enough to access the adult education system whilst courses such as photography were much more available and accessible, with many classes being conducted in local secondary schools.

Indeed my first City and Guilds course was in my old school, which is ironic as the art options available when I was actually at that school as a teenager, were somewhat lacking and photography was certainly not on the curriculum. The Adult Education offerings, certainly in Norwich have changed so much over the last decade, they’ve really declined in course choice and have become much more expensive. This is a real shame.

Do you think social media such as Instagram has an effect on photography; does it benefit your work? Interesting question. I have a bit of a love vs ‘bored now’ relationship with social media but there’s no doubt that platforms like Instagram have democratised access to images and ideas that would once have been obscure or inaccessible.  You are not restricted to the grubby dog-eared stock in your under-resourced local library, or on what happens to be flavour of the month in The Face or NME.  Today, an image maker can be a self-curating cultural magpie in a way a predecessor even just a few years ago could not have imagined. However, I do feel lucky to know what life without social media was like...

It concerns me that it’s easy to put pressure on ourselves to constantly be ‘seen’ to be making work, checking if it’s being well received etc when really we just tossing it out in to an unknown seemingly ever changing algorithm which is someone else’s business model and so we are not really in control of its future anyway.

The positives are that it’s a great way to meet people to work with and it’s brilliant as a way to stay in touch. It can be a very supportive place but there’s a tipping point and it’s important to remind ourselves that we are more than a number.

What are your future aims and do they include photography? It feels like it’s taken me so long to finally be working with photography (my creative life has been far from linear!) that I can’t imagine photography not being a part of my future. I’m always questioning my practice, I learned through keeping journals at uni that I’m naturally a reflective person and that the work I make is often a response to what’s around me.

I’m planning on returning to education to do an MA in two or three years time. At present, I really want to spend some time making new work and gaining more experience out in the world - all of which I can take with me to my next education phase. I was approached by a uni professor who very kindly visited my degree show work and he suggested I could think about going straight for a PhD which whilst amazing to hear and has certainly made think of the long term possibilities, I feel personally if there is a PhD within my work (within me...)  then an MA is the stepping stone that I need to get me there. I can’t image not returning to education, it may sound dramatic but it has been life changing. It’s not a case of if I go back, it’s just a matter of when.

My degree show, final uni project and my dissertation continues to inform my personal work and ideas.  The show featured installation work of a seventies inspired lounge which I really enjoyed creating. The space invited the viewer to become part of the work. With my photography on the walls and my moving image work looping on period correct televisions, everyday I observed how the audience interacted with the work and I became even more convinced that photography for me was about imagery across disciplines and multi-media innovation, driving me to question the role of a photographer today.

I didn’t realise at the time when I was hauling pieces of furniture across London for my degree show installation that this wasn’t actually the final product, but in fact it was further research. I’m so glad I helped look after the degree show everyday because being able to watch the reactions to my work was really a lightbulb moment about it’s possibilities.

I’d love to exhibit again, I’m planning to keep working through ideas using photography, moving image and installation and I’m also looking at releasing work within a zine format. Ultimately I just want to keep making work which interests me enough to continue making more work.

An interview with Photograd Open 2018 exhibiting photographer Katie Hayward

Photography students at London Metropolitan University supported in the curation of our very first open exhibition and also selected a number of exhibiting photographers to interview about their work.

Here we have an interview with Katie Hayward.


How would you describe your project and relationship to the title Between Darkness and Light? Between Darkness and Light is an observation of the landscape of the coastal town of Lowestoft in Suffolk. The town occupies the most easterly point of the country and so is positioned as one of its extremities. The body of work seeks to provide a subtle acknowledgement of industries won and lost over time, giving a glimpse into Lowestoft’s tumultuous past and tentative future. It is a town, like many in the UK, forced to live through governmental decisions made at a distance, which directly impact upon the communities that live and work there. While our government negotiates for our exit from the European Union, potentially using our fishing waters as the bargaining tool, this is more prominent now than ever before in this town.

From the series  Between Darkness and Light

From the series Between Darkness and Light

The title of the project is derived from my research into the writings of W. G. Sebald and his book titled The Rings of Saturn whereby he narrates his journey along the East Coast.  When describing his experience of Lowestoft, he recalls looking out towards the sea through a bay window of the dining room of his rather lacklustre hotel, stating that “Outside was the beach, somewhere between the darkness and the light” (Sebald, P.43). These words resonated with me as they seemed to fit with the general essence of the place that I had experienced and also politically, socially, economically and emotionally in a metaphorical sense.  

What was the inspiration for the project? I had developed a genuine interest in the concept of place photographically and having recently moved to the East Coast I was curious to see how documenting a place with which I had no knowledge of, or emotional connection to, would impact upon the images I produced at the other end. Would my photographic exploration create an emotional connection or attachment of sorts or would my role in documenting it keep me distanced from it? This was the catalyst for starting the project. 

How has the course at the University of Suffolk shaped your practice? When I started my course at the University of Suffolk, we were taken right back to basics with 35mm black and white film where we learned to develop and print our own work.  This really helped me connect with where photography had grown from and allowed me to join the dots with where photography is now.  I had never stepped foot into a darkroom and so the learning curve was a steep one for me, but very rewarding.  I’m quite an impatient person and the medium of film photography truly challenged me and took me out of my comfort zone.  It made me a more considerate photographer as the process was considerably slower. This helped me to truly appreciate the photographers of the past who never had digital as an option and what an undertaking it must have been for the work that they produced at that time.  The course structure was also a huge thing for me, it really guided me through how to produce a project from proposal through to exhibition and everything in-between, with group critique sessions and presentations of my work I gained the confidence in critiquing my own work as well as the work of others in a constructive way.  

From the series  Between Darkness and Light

From the series Between Darkness and Light

Who is your main photographic inspiration? It is impossible for me to put this down to just one person, but I will try to be as concise. Gerhard Stromberg and his Coastline Catalogue work. Chris Killip and his Inflagrante and Seacoal series. Michael Collins and his Landscape and Industry publication and Hoo Peninsula work.  There is also a small independent publisher called Another Place Press run by photographer Iain Sarjeant who publish books focusing on contemporary landscape photography. Everything they publish is in line with my interests photographically. Iain’s photographic work is also quite something.  

What do you want to achieve and say with your project? I wanted to present images which provoked thought and questions. I wanted to convey a sense of place, an acknowledgement of its community, of its past via the apparatus of its landscapes. I like working in a series-based format with narrative imbedded in the work and I hope the work achieved that in some sense.  

What camera and lens did you use? Initial location scouting and test shooting was done on my trusty Canon 7d mark ii. The formal images were shot on a Shen Hao 5x4 XPO 45-A camera with a 150mm lens.

From the series  Between Darkness and Light

From the series Between Darkness and Light

Why did you choose that equipment? Shooting digital to initially test locations, times of day and compositions enabled me to quite quickly find what worked and what didn’t, I had a lot of ground to cover. I knew I wanted to have the final images on large format as this felt right for the subject matter and detail within the landscapes. I also wanted the images to be presented in large scale and large format is best placed for this to retain as much quality as possible when taking prints large. I also really enjoy the pace of large format and the fact the lenses are fixed focal lengths, it forces me to be more patient and considerate about what I am doing and to really focus on composition. 

What are your career plans? The aim and intention is to continue to grow and progress as a photographic artist, and to push forward with developing bodies of work for exhibition and publication. I am currently in the process of researching several projects of which I am incredibly excited about. I believe I have some very captivating narratives to put out there and hopefully I can do this in a visually compelling way. I want people who engage with my work to feel compelled to enter into wider discussion and debate about its subject.

Photograd Open 2018 - showcasing photobooks and zines

Photograd will be part of Photomonth this year with an exhibition at London Metropolitan University from Friday 16th to Thursday 29th November. We’ve already released the 30 photographers who will be exhibited, which you can find here, but in this post we introduce you to the 15 photographers whose book or zine we will be displaying in the space.

Harry Crown
Judit Sánchez
Daniella Gott
Daniel Harrington
Billie Blossom
Holly Farndell
Krasimira Butseva
Stan Dickinson
Scott Perry and Zoey Barton
Jasper Jones
Arran Davis
Amy Pezzin
Jake Kehar Gill
Callum Beaney
Charlotte Bond

University of Westminster graduate  Jasper Jones  and the series  Scroll

University of Westminster graduate Jasper Jones and the series Scroll

Manchester School of Art graduate  Daniel Harrington  and the series  Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community

Manchester School of Art graduate Daniel Harrington and the series Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community

Falmouth University graduate  Amy Pezzin  and the series  Garden of Extinction

Falmouth University graduate Amy Pezzin and the series Garden of Extinction

University of Westminster graduate  Scott Perry  and the series  Omniscient London

University of Westminster graduate Scott Perry and the series Omniscient London

Falmouth University graduate  Harry Crown  and the series  M A T E O

Falmouth University graduate Harry Crown and the series M A T E O

University of Portsmouth graduate  Krasimira Butseva  and the series  Slices of Red

University of Portsmouth graduate Krasimira Butseva and the series Slices of Red

University of East London graduate  Billie Blossom  and the series  Queer Porn Portraits

University of East London graduate Billie Blossom and the series Queer Porn Portraits

Photograd Open 2018 - exhibiting photographers

Photograd will be part of Photomonth this year with an exhibition at London Metropolitan University from Friday 16th to Thursday 29th November.

Here is a list of the 30 photographers who will be exhibited followed by a few select images.

Daniel Morgan
Alvaro Lopez
Katie Hayward
Judit Sánchez
Giulia Parlato
Dulcie Wagstaff
Peter Spurgeon
Natalia Poniatowska
Elisabetta De Guio
Claire McIntyre
Cheryl Newman
Tom Owens
Miriam Winsor
Zsuzsanna Pálmai
Lottie Wilson
Michael Morgan
Joel Biddle
Kerry Curl
Sarah-Jayne Webb
Matt Terry
Chiara Avagliano
Charlotte Bond
Paula Tollett
Ryan Hardman
Sara Cucè
Steve Le Grys
Jack Johnson
Beata Stencel
Rose Sapey
Sara Fiorino

London Metropolitan University graduate  Zsuzsanna Pálmai  and the series  1 to 7 Billion

London Metropolitan University graduate Zsuzsanna Pálmai and the series 1 to 7 Billion

University of Brighton graduate  Dulcie Wagstaff  and the series  Familiar Gardens

University of Brighton graduate Dulcie Wagstaff and the series Familiar Gardens

Carmarthen School of Art graduate Sarah-Jayne Webb and the series  A Happening

Carmarthen School of Art graduate Sarah-Jayne Webb and the series A Happening

Ravensbourne University graduate  Rose Sapey  and the series  Masterpieces Responses

Ravensbourne University graduate Rose Sapey and the series Masterpieces Responses

University of South Wales graduate  Peter Spurgeon  and the series  Docoy

University of South Wales graduate Peter Spurgeon and the series Docoy

University of East London graduate  Steve Le Grys

University of East London graduate Steve Le Grys


 

Private View: Thursday 15th November, 6pm.

London Metropolitan University, The Cass, Atrium Space, Goulston Street. E1 7TP

Use Aldgate or Aldgate East underground, or Liverpool Street for a 10 minute walk.

Milda Books presents the photobook "Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country" by Georgs Avetisjans

Milda Books presents the photobook Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country by University of Brighton graduate Georgs Avetisjans at the Photo Publishers Market organised by Brighton Photo Fringe and Photoworks.

Phoenix Brighton, October 20th - 21st. 11am - 5pm.


“Landscapes – actual, remembered or idealized – feed our sense of belonging to whatever place, region or nation that we view as homeland.”

Liz Wells
Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country (2015-2018)
is a multi-layered photographic narrative in a form of a photobook with cross-references like hyperlinks to additionally inserted stories connected to the subjects and landscape. The book is about the village where my Armenian-Greek father once had a dream to build a house for our family, but unfortunately couldn’t finish it as he passed away when I was only 6 months young.

The project explores the sea, the land and memories, how the time affects and changes our sense of a place at the same time serving a nostalgic representation of the village in Latvia - Kaltene and its recent history from World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 via interviews, notes and archival imagery. As the Iron curtain fell, the local economy changed and upon joining the EU in 2004, it changed again. These historical shifts made a huge impact on the society and its dreams, many of which the younger generations have abandoned.

The place is located between the forest and the sea about 100 km northwest of the capital Riga. In the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th century it was the second most productive village in the country as 55 seagoing sailing ships were built there.

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Images from the series  The Longest Village in the Country  by Georgs Avetisjans

Images from the series The Longest Village in the Country by Georgs Avetisjans

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London Independent Photography presents the 30th annual exhibition at Espacio Gallery + free talks by photographic artists

Preview: Thurs 4th October 2018, 6pm – 9pm

Exhibition: Tues 2nd – Sat 6th October 2018, 1pm –  7pm

Sun 7th October, 1pm – 5pm

Venue: Espacio Gallery, 159 Bethnal Green Road, London, E2 7DG


London Independent Photography celebrates its 30th annual exhibition this year at Espacio Gallery in Bethnal Green, from Tuesday 2nd of October to Sunday 7th of October 2018.

The members of LIP were invited to submit their most innovative and creative works through an open call launched in August 2018. A panel of professionals from the photography industry were invited to select the works taking part in the exhibition, including Tom Lovelace who is an artist, curator and visiting tutor at RCA and has been nominated for the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize, along with Hazel Watts, who is a managing partner at Spectrum Photographic and have worked on projects such as Brighton Photo Biennial and Focus Mumbai, and also Wendy McMurdo, who is an artist, photographer and tutor at Falmouth University and has exhibited at TPG and The Scottish National Portrait Gallery.

More than 100 photographs created by 72 photographers were selected and the varied collection includes landscape, portrait, still-life and experimental photography. The 30th annual exhibition is also a part of prestige International Photography Festival Photomonth, happening each autumn in East London.


Joint statement by LIP: ‘’Our annual exhibition is a celebration of the 30th anniversary year and the great talent of all LIP members. This year the selectors have chosen thought-provoking and innovative photography, which will display the diversity and craft of the photographers behind the organisation London Independent Photography.’’

In addition to the LIP 30th annual exhibition a programme of free talks by photography practitioners will take place between Tuesday and Sunday. On the 3rd of October, Wednesday from 6:30pm Dafna Talmor - an artist and lecturer will speak about her on-going series Constructed Landscapes made from collaged colour negatives through historical and contemporary references. On the Friday, 5th of October from 5:30pm, the artist Peter Ainsworth will discuss his current research practice surrounding the museum space examined through the use of consumer level photogrammetry apps. On the following day Saturday, 6th of October from 6:30pm, Thom Bridge will present an on-going collaboration with his identical twin Theo challenging the twin as a photographic trope and his project Field/s in collaboration with other artists funded by Artquest. The last talk of the series will be by the Ukrainian photographer Alina Kisina, on the 7th of October from 1:30pm, where she will discuss the ways to enrich one’s artistic practice by combining one’s photographic practice with teaching.

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Revolv Collective presents 4UZHBINA

Preview: 29th September, 6:00pm – 9:00pm

Open daily: 30th September – 29th November, 11:00am-5:00pm

Venue: Phoenix Gallery, 10-14 Waterloo Place, Brighton BN2 9NB


Revolv Collective invites you to The Collective’s Hub, part of Brighton Photo Fringe taking place at Phoenix Brighton from Saturday 30th September to Sunday 29th November 2018.

4uzhbina is a photographic installation, created collaboratively by the artists Krasimira Butseva and Lina Ivanova, for Brighton Photo Fringe 2018. The word ‘4uzhbina’ describes a non-existent place, an illusory location, which cannot be found on any map, nevertheless it could be accessed by anybody. It is simply an invention of the tongue, existing only in the spoken and written Bulgarian language. The term contains simultaneously the essence of a no-man’s land and a dolce vita. 

In her new work, Krasimira Butseva uses moving image and appropriates found photography and materials, entangling personal and fictional histories. In her short film, she remembers the day, in which Bulgaria was accepted in the European Union, while performing repetitive rituals and readings. Using a found family archive originating from Kent, Krasimira plays with connotation and denotation, shaping a completely new narrative out of the photographs. Through this body of work, she explores the way in which politics inform nations and form identities, along with the correlation between native roots and cultural routes.

Lina Ivanova’s autobiographical piece explores issues of representation, identity and status of the migrant in the birth country. Photography becomes a power tool to remember, to store memories and experiences and possess a space, in which one feels insecure.  The manipulation of family archival records creates a personal interpretation of one’s own origin. The use of alternative processes suggests the transition from a state of familiar to a state of the foreign. Fragile family photos are reproduced on the surfaces of domestic objects and removed from their expected setting providing a context of the every-day in a moment of return. 

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Events

4UZHBINA: Artist talk 

20th October 2018 (Saturday)
1:00pm – 2:00pm

The founders of Revolv Collective, Krasimira Butseva and Lina Ivanova will form a dialogue about methods of using found photography and objects, alongside alternative processes to create new bodies of work. Reflection on current work on display at the Collective’s Hub, will lead to a discussion about belonging and identity. 

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Routes OR Roots

27th October 2018 (Saturday)
12:00pm – 2:00pm

Routes OR Roots invites participants to take part in a two-hour long workshop delivered by Revolv Collective. The activities encompassing notions of belonging and the self, welcomes participants to contribute to the workshop with personal objects, photography and memories in order to form a narrative of personal and collective diaspora. The workshop is open to people from any age and background to join.

[City] Stories - Urban photography exhibition

WORLDWIDE COLLECTIVE OF URBAN PHOTOGRAPHERS STAGE EXHIBITION AT FOUR CORNERS IN BETHNAL GREEN

13 urban photographers from Goldsmiths are opening their MA Degree Show at Four Corners gallery from 3rd-6th October 2018, including an exclusive lecture from Danish photographer Lene Hald.

The exhibition will feature new work made as part of the Photography & Urban Cultures MA at Goldsmiths, University of London, exploring the creative interplay between urban theory and the visual representation of cities & communities.

Coming from all over the world, the artists featured share their take on the contemporary life of the city, informed by urban theory and sociological research.


 
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3rd - 6th October, Four Corners Gallery (London), part of Photomonth

10th - 14th October, Phoenix Brighton, part of Brighton Photo Fringe

Private View - 4th October, 6-9pm - register here

Urban Photographer's Association Annual Lecture by Danish photographer Lene Hald - 5th October, 4-5.30pm

Artist's Panel & Urban Photo Walk - 6th October, 2-4.30pm

*All events are free.


Co-curator Becky Morris Knight commented:

“As global urbanization speeds up and our political and media environments become more fragmented, exploring and examining how we live together becomes an urgent task and one which artists can make a valuable contribution to.”

“The work we make is informed, inspired and underpinned by sociology and urbanism, helping us to create meaningful images which speak to important issues our society faces, such as gentrification, media censorship, the body, identity and class.”

About the exhibition

Ting-Ling Yu shares a delicate exploration of nudity and public decency in London, while Yihong Wu’s work offers a consideration of typical interiors in China through carefully composed medium format images.

Image by Steve Jones

Image by Steve Jones

Other projects include Steve Jones’ forensic examination of the staircase as a shaper of architectural space and Henry Woodley’s personal journey through the waterways of London and the communities of boaters he lives alongside.

Image by Henry Woodley

Image by Henry Woodley

Artist Shan Ye worked in green spaces in London to think about how citizens in a wealthy country use their leisure time. Bo-Cheng Liu took inspiration from the margins, walking over 100km to explore the liminal land between airports and the city, often overlooked and unconsidered.

Image by Becky Morris Knight

Image by Becky Morris Knight

Becky Morris Knight approached the idea of how our online spaces influence our urban lives, with a series which looks at how censorship works on Instagram and what that might look like if applied to our cities.

Image by Qiunan Li

Image by Qiunan Li

Taking a personal approach, Mia Irmgard Klit will be launching an innovative photobook which challenges conventional approaches to medical sociology by exploring her sister’s experience of coma. Qiunan Li is also looking at memory and individual experience in his project in which he picks out images he cannot remember making and creates a new narrative from them.

Image by Lee Gavin

Image by Lee Gavin

Lee Gavin will be showing a series of portraits which investigate class, life milestones and identity, while Korean photographer Suhyuk Chai shares images made within a transient community on the Trans-Siberian Railway.

Image by Lorena Sanchez Pereira

Image by Lorena Sanchez Pereira

Kat Huber’s poetic work captures a fleeting moment within the landscape, layering the past, present and future in images of a derelict fairground slated for renewal in Berlin. Also considering a landscape in flux, Lorena Sanchez Pereira creates large-scale images exploring the regeneration of Hackney Wick in her series Gentricity.

Special Events

The exhibition also has a series of special events taking place throughout the run, kicking off with the Private View on 4th October, 6 – 9pm.

Danish photographer Lene Hald will fly in to deliver the Urban Photographer’s Association Annual Lecture on the 5th October, 4-5.30pm in the Four Corners gallery.

Titled Photography, care and co-creation, the talk will set off in Hald’s own photographic work, which is situated in the intersection of photography, visual storytelling, social engagement and participatory practice.

On Saturday 6th October, urban photographer and Director of Urban Photo Fest, Paul Halliday, will be chairing a panel discussion with 3 of the artists from the exhibition, considering the role photography can play in generating new knowledge of the urban.

After it closes in London, [City] Stories will transfer to Phoenix Brighton as part of Brighton Photo Fringe, from 10th – 14th October.

www.citystorieslondon.com

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https://www.instagram.com/citystorieslondon/

Hull International Photography Festival

5th October to 28th October 2018, from The Creative & Cultural Company

HIP Fest may well be the country’s biggest annual Photography festivals and it returns for a 5th year. Turning the city’s largest shopping mall into a cultural centre for the whole month, 12 major exhibitions in converted galleries will stand alongside the usual outfitters, boutiques and chains. It is this unique venue that helped account for  8600 visits to the festival last year.


New for 2018

PhotoCity come to Hull for the opening weekend, following on from their PhotoCity London exhibition & trade show close by St Paul's Cathedral. 

Partners Fujiholics & Redeye will be facilitating on the opening weekend, which will feature more workshops, masterclasses and photowalks than ever before. Making 50 events over the month.

Festival highlights

Exhibitions

POP, by legendary photographer Brian Griffin, features his music photography and album covers from the UK’s post punk and new wave music scene

Premier of the intense and personal Stranger In My Mother’s Kitchen exhibition by Celine Marchbank delves the therapeutic power of photography (shortlisted for the Deutsche Bank Photography Awards) 

A world premiere exhibition of fashion icons in Haute Couture to the Birth of Prêt-à-Porter A Fashion Retrospective by Marilyn Stafford

A1 Britain On The Verge by World Press Award-winning photographer  Peter Dench is a homage to Britain’s longest road, captured with Peter’s typical sense of humour and humanity.

50 Workshops and Masterclass include

A masterclass by Youtuber sensation Sean Tucker

Fujiholics director Matt Hart takes us out on a photowalk

Elke Vogelsang is coming from Germany to talk Dogsonality

Tom Stoddart shows how every picture tells a story


HipFest is committed to bringing new talent, and radical and diverse artistic sensibilities, to a curious public. So expect to discover new and intriguing photographers and unforeseen views of the world. There is an open exhibition and learning opportunities for all levels of ability and experience 

This year HIP FEST supports Care International’s Lendwithcare Campaign and will have an exhibition from 5 international women photographers to raise awareness. 

Alan Raw Curator & Festival Director said:

“In just five years, HIP Fest has established its credentials as one of the most significant photography events in Europe.  Thanks to our fabulous volunteers we have put together a stunning celebration of photography for 2018. I am particularly looking forward to welcoming Celine Marchbank and Marilyn Stafford to HIPFest, their work highlights the contribution female photographers have made, and are making, to this most democratic of art forms. There will be something for everyone and plenty to learn, do and enjoy.”


A £5 entry ticket (wristband) gives access to all exhibitions, discussions, the HIPfest Prize Draw, on-site discounts and access to many of the workshops. Premier workshops, master-classes and portfolio reviews require individual additional tickets, available on Eventbrite.

For further details of the festival visit www.HIPfest.co.uk or email: hipgalleryinfo@gmail.com

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Wellcome launches £20,000 photography prize to showcase powerful stories about health

A new international photography prize celebrating compelling imagery that captures stories of health, medicine and science launches today. Wellcome Photography Prize invites photographers to enter their images which highlight the most challenging health issues of our time.

The overall winner of Wellcome Photography Prize will receive a £15,000 prize, with the winner of each of the four categories receiving £1,250. Prizes will be presented at an awards ceremony in London in summer 2019.

Winning entries will also be showcased in a public exhibition at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London in July 2019. The shortlisted entries will be shown alongside a photo series commissioned by Wellcome, which will tell an in-depth story on the theme of ‘outbreaks’ from the perspective of a celebrated documentary photographer, to be announced later this year.

Key dates

Deadline for entries
17 December 2018

Winners announced
3 July 2019

Exhibition opens
4 July 2019

Submit your entry here


Categories

There are four categories in the competition:

  • Social perspectives – explore how health and illness affect the way we live

  • Hidden worlds – reveal details hidden to the naked eye

  • Medicine in focus – show health and healthcare up close and personal

  • Outbreaks (2019 theme) – capture the impact of disease as it spreads

Microparticle drug delivery  by Annie Cavanagh / Wellcome Image Award winner 2009 / Credit: Annie Cavanagh. CC BY-NC

Microparticle drug delivery by Annie Cavanagh / Wellcome Image Award winner 2009 / Credit: Annie Cavanagh. CC BY-NC

Inside Ghana's biggest bushmeat market  by Nyani Quarmyne / published on  mosaicscience.com / Credit: Nyani Quarmyne / Panos Pictures 2016

Inside Ghana's biggest bushmeat market by Nyani Quarmyne / published on mosaicscience.com/ Credit: Nyani Quarmyne / Panos Pictures 2016

Two young boys in rural Nicaragua  by Joshua McDonald / Wellcome Image Awards winner 2017/ Credit: Joshua McDonald

Two young boys in rural Nicaragua by Joshua McDonald / Wellcome Image Awards winner 2017/ Credit: Joshua McDonald

The man with the golden blood  by Greg White / published on  mosaicscience.com  / Credit: Greg White / Wellcome 2014

The man with the golden blood by Greg White / published on mosaicscience.com / Credit: Greg White / Wellcome 2014

Prizes and publicity

Images will be shortlisted and then winners chosen by a panel of high-profile judges.

The winner of each category will receive £1,250, with the overall winner receiving a prize of £15,000. Prizes will be presented at an awards ceremony in London on 3 July 2019.

All the winning and shortlisted entries will go on show in a major public exhibition at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 4-13 July 2019.

If you’re a winner, we will also offer you opportunities to take part in events to showcase your work to a range of audiences. Our winning images receive extensive international media coverage each year.

The winner of the Medicine in Focus category will be invited to produce the Julie Dorrington commission, a photo story exploring and documenting a patient’s journey with their condition.

Judges panel

The judges for the 2019 prize are:

  • Emma Bowkett, Director of Photography at FT Weekend Magazine, UK

  • Dan M. Davis, Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester, UK

  • Dr Heidi Larson, Director of The Vaccine Confidence Project at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

  • Joanne Liu, International President of Médecins Sans Frontières, Switzerland

  • Pete Muller, National Geographic Photographer and Fellow, Kenya

  • Azu Nwagbogu, Curator at Large for Photography at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, South Africa

  • Chair: Jeremy Farrar, Director, Wellcome, UK.


Entries to the Wellcome Photography Prize 2019 will be accepted on its website which contains full terms and conditions for entry. The deadline for entries is 17 December 2018.

Wellcome Photography Prize 2019 exhibition will open at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 4 to 13 July 2019. Entry will be free and open to all.

Sign up to Wellcome Photography Prize emails.

Follow on Instagram: @WellcomePhotoPrize #WPP19


Source: https://wellcome.ac.uk/what-we-do/our-work...

Current Professional Development Opportunities from GRAIN and FORMAT

GRAIN Portfolio Development Day | 13th October | 10am - 4.30pm | Birmingham City University, Parkside Building. 

We will be joined by: Camilla Brown Curator, writer and lecturer on contemporary art, specialising in photography. Award winning photographer and Magnum nominee Lua Ribiera. Acclaimed photographer Andrew Jackson who was the recipient of the Autograph ABP 2018/Lightwork International Photography Residency in Syracuse, New York. As well as Freelance Project Manager Seba Chaudhry who has worked on major projects including Rhubarb Rhubarb and Format International Photography Festival.

The day will be split into two parts a morning of talks and in the afternoon an opportunity for one to one portfolio reviews.

Please note there will be a maximum of 20 attendees to enable a focussed day. Tickets are priced at £25 or £18 Concessions (Students, OAP, Low or No pay).

For more information and to book a ticket please click here.

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GRAIN AND FORMAT/QUAD MASTERCLASSES OPEN CALL | Deadline 7th October

East Meets West is a collaborative project devised by FORMAT International Photography Festival/QUADand GRAIN Projects.  This year we will be offering a series of Masterclasses leading to an opportunity to showcase your work at FORMAT19.

At the Masterclasses you will learn from industry leaders such about portfolio development and receive advice regarding topics such as, competitions, commissions, exhibitions, funding, making approaches, distribution and editing.  Subjects will also include socially engaged, editorial and fine art photography, the photobook and responding to and working to commission. The Masterclasses will offer immersion in the subject matter and a unique opportunity for emerging photographers to develop their practice and showcase their work.

Masterclass speakers and portfolio reviewers include Natasha CaruanaHarry HardieAndrew JacksonAnthony LuveraMatthew MurrayKate Peters and Michael Sargeant.

Deadline to apply 7th October.

For further information and how to apply please click here.

 
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Introducing Findr

In this blog post we introduce you to findr, a brand new platform supporting photographers and finding them work. They simplify the search and booking process of photographers for work by giving direct access through their platform.

Findr can help if you are a photographer or need a photographer!

 
 

What is findr? Findr is an online booking platform through which photographers can showcase their skills and find more work. It was created for photographers, by photographers who grew tired of the unnecessary struggles that come with marketing oneself, finding clients, and arranging bookings. Findr aims at making it easier for photographers to find work that fits around their schedules, while still respecting their independence and artistic freedom.

Who are you? What's your photographic background? I am a photographer and picture editor from Edinburgh. I worked in the press industry for 15 years. I particularly enjoy portraiture, and marketing and events photography that gives me the ability to tell stories for the clients.

How did the platform emerge? The platform emerged from the need to create a solution to an everyday problem I faced as a picture editor: how to quickly and simply find photographers I could trust to work on projects I was involved in.

Image by Harry Spekter

Image by Harry Spekter

Who's behind Findr? Tell us about the team. Findr is made of a small team of people dedicated to improving the landscape of commissioned photography. The technology is created by Ben, Josh, and Rob, while the operational excellence is handled by Alex, Christian, and Pauline. And, of course, we'd be nothing without the community of over 3,000 amazing photographers we're lucky enough already be working with!

Who would you ideally like to get involved with Findr? We're looking for hardworking, reliable, and creative photographers interested in accelerating or improving their careers and in working with a growing list of great brands through findr.

Image by Michael Sheridan

Image by Michael Sheridan

How can people go about being part of the platform? It's super easy and quick! Head over to www.findr.me and create your photographer profile. You can add your portfolio, all the services you offer, and manage your own schedule.

Who is Findr's audience? Findr is meant for a community of professional photographers and clients who love and benefit from good photography.

What are the benefits of being part of or using Findr? New work, new opportunities, so little hassle! By signing up to work with findr, you join a direct route to work without any of the hardships that come along with being a freelance photographer, and companies receive an efficient management system for their projects.

Image by Pooyan

Image by Pooyan

What does Findr's future look like? Here at findr, we love to dream big! Our goal is to become the global marketplace for professional photographers and customers on an international scale.

Follow findr on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.