Daisy Ware-Jarrett interviews Jared Krauss

To accompany the new edition of PGZ, we approached industry experts to select from submissions received a photography graduate they would like to interview for Photograd. Here we have #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine’s Daisy Ware-Jarrett interviewing Kingston University MA student Jared Krauss.


My name is Daisy Ware-Jarrett and I am Co-editor and Co-founder of #PHOTOGRAPHY magazine. When I was asked to interview one person from a selected shortlist of photographers Jared Krauss' work jumped out at me right away. I was drawn to Jared's unique perspective and the energy captured in his Brexit themed series. I was eager to sit with Jared and find out more about his series.

Image from the series  Who Wants Brexit?

Image from the series Who Wants Brexit?

Why did you decide to create a series about Brexit? In a way, the decision was made for me. I’m interested in the every day, and how people creatively navigate their everyday strictures and structures. I’m also interested in disruptions within and of the everyday. Brexit, though, has created a whole new everyday reality, especially for those of us living in the UK. There feels to be a mass amount of anxiety, a fear of the unknown future, permeating the every day because of Brexit, and yet there is this group of people who not only want it, but will stand tall in public proudly proclaiming their support in spite of the sort of existential dread the rest of the population seems to be experiencing. In the end I felt I would be remiss if I didn’t make work pertaining to Brexit. I’m sure many of us will look at our archive in the future and see other threads we can pull on to elucidate the experiences we’ve had during the fight over Brexit, but we won’t have the opportunity to photograph in the moment again. So I felt I must. It was there and I had a camera and some questions.

Image from the series  Who Wants Brexit?

Image from the series Who Wants Brexit?

One of the most captivating aspects of your series is how it's shot from a low angle. Was this an intentional decision and if so why did you choose to shoot this way? What drew me to this particular protest, the pro-Brexit march in December of 2018 in London, was the question, “Who wants Brexit?” Not only was this march being billed as far-right, and anti-immigrant, it would undoubtably be countered by a much larger march. Beyond that, as I said above, they were marching in spite of a generalized air of anxiety around a no-deal Brexit, let alone Mays plan. In fact, almost overwhelmingly, they wanted a no-deal Brexit. Having made photographs in the lead up to the 2016 election, but especially in Washington D.C. on the day of Trump’s Inauguration, I had become acquainted with some of the tension that can arise when I work in spaces whose politics starkly oppose mine. So, on the one hand, I wanted the aesthetics of the images to be something that any of the subjects—whether in the moment or if they see this work now—could not reasonably claim I was presenting a garish portrait.  However, I didn’t want the sea of the protest, because that would distract from looking at their faces, to intimately know the answer to, “Who wants Brexit?” I felt the posters and flags they carried could suffice to hint at more of their identity. Since I use a manual focus, wide angle lens, the only way to achieve this was to be literally under their chin. I often fell over backwards while shooting. It was entertaining for everyone, and quite fun for me.

Image from the series  Who Wants Brexit?

Image from the series Who Wants Brexit?

Do you think your position as an American living in the UK gives you a unique perspective on Brexit and the public response to it? In some ways it feels inconsequential for me, an American also with an Italian passport, to have an opinion on Brexit, let alone a perspective. What can I offer here, when in both my own countries I feel there are cruel and crude administrations in power? But then I remember that the existing structures of power, coercion, extortion, oppression, and repression, are constantly sharing techniques, are constantly testing in focus groups new pitches, are constantly building new products for more profit, and that one of the few ways we have to manipulate all those energies to our benefit is to unmask the rhetorics used to draw our attention to the very idea of exiting the European Union, or building a wall on the southern border, when within our very borders, within each of our towns, children are hungry, children are killing each other, the addicted are dying, students are floundering in debt, wars we began and contribute to are raging afar and their victims are fleeing the violence we’ve wrought to come to our countries and are being treated inhumanly. Cambridge Analytica, for starters, is an interesting connection between Brexit and Trump, not to mention the rhetoric around foreigners. One thing that the UK and the US share, also, and gives me a bit of hope, is that my generation and the next overwhelmingly don’t support Brexit or Trump, but, unfortunately, despite being the largest voting bloc, not enough vote.

Do you plan on creating more Brexit-themed work? Always and already. 

Image from the series  Who Wants Brexit?

Image from the series Who Wants Brexit?

What do you hope people will take away from this series? I’m not sure. I hope they will bring something to the work, though. I hope they will bring their own ideas and assumptions about what Brexit means, and is, and that they’ll hold my photos up against those thoughts to see what they can see, and then speak about it. I’d love to hear from viewers, but ultimately I want people to have conversations around Brexit in their everyday lives. As much as we’re saturated with politics on the news, whether it was in anticipation of Robert Mueller releasing his report, or seeing if Brexit actually happens on the 29 of March, or in April, or May, or two years from now—that saturation most often comes from the media and from the governments’ and corporations’ representatives. The more we have conversations, or even arguments, the more we approach making the decisions ourselves, and, better yet, start asking the question, “why does it have to be thisy way?” Because it doesn’t. Of course, critical thinking needs must be a part of those conversations, but they don’t always have to begin at a critical place. It can be a joke, a snide remark, or an earnest question, but getting people to articulate why they support something, and not letting them skip out after a superficial answer, will force people to be more critical with themselves. That’s the only way we’re going to work up a resistance to being hoodwinked into fearing the Other, whomever that next is. Keep asking why.

#PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine’s Genea Bailey interviews Jordan Turnbull

To accompany the new edition of PGZ, we approached industry experts to select from submissions received a photography graduate they would like to interview for Photograd. Here we have #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine’s Genea Bailey interviewing University of Gloucestershire graduate Jordan Turnbull.


Curating #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine has introduced me to many fascinating bodies of work, those that resonate most are projects with a compelling narrative, which is essential when it comes to issues of importance such as Brexit. Jordan Turnball’s series A Rock and a Hard Place explores beneath the surface of Gibraltar, revealing the troubling core of a British territory in political limbo and shedding a light on an overlooked community. 

Image from the series  A Rock and a Hard Place

Image from the series A Rock and a Hard Place

What was it about Gibraltar specifically that moved you to make this body of work opposed to other territories within British jurisdiction? I was researching possible ideas for my Final Major project knowing that I wanted to focus on something Brexit related because this was the biggest change to happen to the country in decades and it would affect how Britain interacted both internally and with the rest of the of the world.

I was reading a ‘Financial Times’ piece detailing the issues surrounding the “Irish Backstop” and after finishing the piece there was a related article on Gibraltar and how Brexit would affect the tiny overseas territory. I did look into other territories such as Helena and Ascension but Gibraltar’s ease of access and the way the inhabitants had showed their loyalty to Britain in the past only reinforced my vision that the work would hold greater resonance there.

Gibraltar appears to be a haven caught among generations of consistent turmoil between irreconcilable governments. Having explored and documented the culture, in what way do you think this has affected Gibraltarian people and everyday life? I think, to a degree, this has affected the Gibraltarians. I have heard about fisherman being hassled after the Brexit vote went through and threats regarding the border have been made before although nothing too concrete has been put in place as of yet. It does seem to me that each generation of Gibraltarian has got to prove where their loyalties lie, as if those who had voted in 2002 would feel any less British than the generation who voted in 1967, with both outcomes resulting in resounding favour of British sovereignty. 

Image from the series  A Rock and a Hard Place

Image from the series A Rock and a Hard Place

I can completely understand why they would feel very frustrated and a little bit apprehensive that any movement politically that Britain or Spain makes could unearth this issue again and go to a peoples vote, which having spoken to Deputy Chief Minister Joseph Garcia, would no doubt result in the same outcome of the previous two. Gibraltarians are British, although territorially not part of the mainland, which means that Gibraltar has a balancing act on its hands in keeping both Spain, its neighbour, happy while continuing with a proud British identity. 

Your work shows an unwavering loyalty to the UK despite the Gibraltarian people having overwhelming voted to remain. Do you think this support will falter once exit negotiations have come into full effect, especially with Gibraltarian economy relying heavily on Spanish trade and open borders? I think this would be more difficult to foresee because things can change so quickly and go in the opposite direction to what was predicted. There are a couple of things that make Gibraltar such a unique place. One being that they are almost entirely self-governing and completely self-financing which allows them to create their own budgets which in turn has shown economic growth possibly when other EU members have not. While I was there I noticed just how much construction was happening in the area, owing to the high demand for development of properties within an area which is still seen as very attractive to businesses establishing themselves. Gibraltar does rely on Spain for construction and other materials so hypothetically if they chose to cut off these links by a hard border it could have detrimental affects on Gibraltars economy. On the other hand Gibraltar single handedly accounts for 25% GDP of the overall southern region of Andalucía through employment and purchasing of these aforementioned materials so Spain would have to determine whether to lose such a positive partner and think about the social and economic implications of those actions. 

Image from the series  A Rock and a Hard Place

Image from the series A Rock and a Hard Place

Has creating this work shifted your viewpoint on Brexit and what it means to be British? In short regarding whether my viewpoint has been changed, no, it has not due to the fact that there have been no positive steps to come out of the whole process. We have gone through the initial transfer talks, parliamentary meetings to summits and thus far are no closer to agreeing a deal with the EU than when we started in June 2017. 

To be British, for me, is to be proud of my country, respectful and have a sense of belonging. It's also a privilege especially when you turn on the news and see some of the other events that are happening in other parts of the world and I do think this is disregarded a lot of the time. Making the work certainly reinforced my pride in Britain as there’s a real neighbourly atmosphere within Gibraltar shown through the decorative Union Jacks on almost every street as a way of reminding people of their history, back in the UK we only get that robust togetherness feeling when a World Cup is on or its one of the Royals birthdays, but when it happens its certainly a great feeling. 

Image from the series  A Rock and a Hard Place

Image from the series A Rock and a Hard Place

Do you have any plans to continue the project or any other Brexit based work? I do have plans to go back to Gibraltar and continue the project, there’s a few other photographers making work over in that corner which is good because its got a lot to say for itself and the people are really interesting. Brexit is an absolute goldmine for photographic work not just politically but on a social level too as something will always be shifting further down the line so its good to see other creatives exploring these changes. 

I have certainly been taking notes on other potential situations that are developing or will develop when and indeed if we do eventually leave. Theres an argument that if we leave we could capitalise on greater trading with India, The UAE and Japan which could throw up some interesting narratives with opportunities to travel. We will also more than likely feel the effects of Brexit for years to come so there will constantly be new opportunities for work arising closer to home.

'Better Perspectives': An Interview With Genea Bailey & Daisy Ware-Jarrett

Last month we introduced you to Better Perspectives; a collaboration between travel firm Expedia and eight up-and-coming London photographers. We've interviewed a couple of those involved to find out more about their work and favourite London landmarks. First up we spoke to Ben Shmulevitch, an Edinburgh College of Art graduate who enjoys exploring London's diversity of character.

This time around we've asked Genea and Daisy from #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine some questions about Better Perspectives and their chosen London landmark.


Through Space and Time on the Millennium Bridge

Through Space and Time on the Millennium Bridge

What and where did you study? We met at Coventry University whilst studying Photography. Our course was small and we had inspiring tutors so it was a perfect melting pot for creativity and collaborations.

What do you enjoy most about London, and what does the capital mean to you? The best thing about London is how diverse it is, you’re constantly surrounded by people with different world views, religions and interests. It’s also a very creative place, you can walk down one street and see so many different artists, painters, singers, performing artists and photographers.

What have you learnt from being part of Better Perspectives? Have you enjoyed the project? The project was fun to work on, it had quite a fast turn-around time so we ended up shooting, editing and captioning our work within 48 hours which was intense but ended up being a great learning exercise. A lot of the time we can overthink and second guess our creative choices, something we're sure a lot of other creatives can relate to, but with this project we didn’t have the time to do that so we just ran with what ideas we had in the moment and it worked out for the best. 

Shooting the Millennium Bridge was a little different for us, we’ve both walked past it countless times, but never really stopped to examine it. Doing this project has reminded us that little things we see and take for granted every day can be so much more interesting if you take the time to stop and really examine them, and photography is the perfect reason to do that.

Divided sky, Millennium Bridge

Divided sky, Millennium Bridge

Why did you choose to photograph the Millennium Bridge as an iconic landmark? We chose the Millennium Bridge initially because we both agreed it’s often underrated. We were both young when it originally opened and remember the hype that surrounded it, so it also reminds us of being care-free 8-year-old girls who spent our time watching Powerpuff Girls and signing about girl power. (Although saying that, we still do those things now too!)

How have you approached your subject and captured it in your own way? We tried to spend as much time as possible at the bridge on the day of the shoot, by doing that we started to notice the structure underneath it – an area that’s never really explored. There was one moment that was quite surreal, we were on the river bank under the bridge, about 10 foot below the city, the sun was setting and the bridge was just catching the light in a really beautiful way, then out of nowhere a group of canoers paddled in front of us and under the bridge where they became silhouetted. For a moment it didn’t feel like we were in the city, it felt quiet and peaceful. We got a sharp reminder that we were in London when some rubbish came floating into shot and we had to use sticks to move it a long, it was either a plastic bag or a shoe, can’t quite remember.

Symmetrical Construction, Millennium Bridge

Symmetrical Construction, Millennium Bridge

What, in your opinion, does the future hold for young creatives in London? Now more than ever it’s important for young creatives in London to listen to other people’s voices. Go to see exhibitions and meet creatives from different countries, with a different gender, sexuality or religion to you – challenge your own world view, burst your own bubble and learn from it. Embrace London’s diversity.

Can you tell us about your work? What themes do you explore and what does a typical series look like for you?

Daisy: My work tends to be very insular, usually I’ll lock myself away and binge-watch Netflix whilst I do a load of research on what I’m shooting, I’m an over-preparer and usually this is my favourite part of the whole project. I’m drawn to series’ that challenge what we accept as normal – they make me sit back and think how I see the world, it’s not something I’ve been able to bring through in my own work yet but that’s a hard thing to do and something I’ll always try to work on. 

Genea: I'm still learning and shooting a variety of styles. Sometimes I'll be completely obsessed with a certain narrative, delving deeper into a lifestyle choice or unlikely hobby to photograph. My degree show piece was a documentary series exploring the hidden world of British Beauty Pageants. At the moment I'm working at fashion week and I've fallen in love with the designers aesthetics so that's becoming my biggest inspiration. This year I hope to shoot a lot more creative portraits and fashion work.

Lone pedestrian, Millennium Bridge

Lone pedestrian, Millennium Bridge

Do you use social media to share your work? What are your thoughts on doing so? We both tend to use social media to share our work a lot, it's how we were selected for this project too. The magazine we run (#PHOTOGRAPHY) is built on social media and creating communities to share work with – it’s such a valuable tool for photographers.

Do you think Brexit and the future of the UK will affect your work? 100% yes. As two young creatives living in the UK we both felt very affected by Brexit, we think a lot of our generation (but not all of them) feel proud of Britain’s diversity, it’s part of our national identity and that’s been taken away. If there’s one good thing that will come from Brexit though, it is the work it will inspire, people care about what’s happening and that will come through in their work. The last issue of #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine was focussed on European creativity and unity – most of which was created as a direct response to Brexit so we’re already seeing that happen.