Wellcome launches £20,000 photography prize to showcase powerful stories about health

A new international photography prize celebrating compelling imagery that captures stories of health, medicine and science launches today. Wellcome Photography Prize invites photographers to enter their images which highlight the most challenging health issues of our time.

The overall winner of Wellcome Photography Prize will receive a £15,000 prize, with the winner of each of the four categories receiving £1,250. Prizes will be presented at an awards ceremony in London in summer 2019.

Winning entries will also be showcased in a public exhibition at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London in July 2019. The shortlisted entries will be shown alongside a photo series commissioned by Wellcome, which will tell an in-depth story on the theme of ‘outbreaks’ from the perspective of a celebrated documentary photographer, to be announced later this year.

Key dates

Deadline for entries
17 December 2018

Winners announced
3 July 2019

Exhibition opens
4 July 2019

Submit your entry here


Categories

There are four categories in the competition:

  • Social perspectives – explore how health and illness affect the way we live

  • Hidden worlds – reveal details hidden to the naked eye

  • Medicine in focus – show health and healthcare up close and personal

  • Outbreaks (2019 theme) – capture the impact of disease as it spreads

Microparticle drug delivery  by Annie Cavanagh / Wellcome Image Award winner 2009 / Credit: Annie Cavanagh. CC BY-NC

Microparticle drug delivery by Annie Cavanagh / Wellcome Image Award winner 2009 / Credit: Annie Cavanagh. CC BY-NC

Inside Ghana's biggest bushmeat market  by Nyani Quarmyne / published on  mosaicscience.com / Credit: Nyani Quarmyne / Panos Pictures 2016

Inside Ghana's biggest bushmeat market by Nyani Quarmyne / published on mosaicscience.com/ Credit: Nyani Quarmyne / Panos Pictures 2016

Two young boys in rural Nicaragua  by Joshua McDonald / Wellcome Image Awards winner 2017/ Credit: Joshua McDonald

Two young boys in rural Nicaragua by Joshua McDonald / Wellcome Image Awards winner 2017/ Credit: Joshua McDonald

The man with the golden blood  by Greg White / published on  mosaicscience.com  / Credit: Greg White / Wellcome 2014

The man with the golden blood by Greg White / published on mosaicscience.com / Credit: Greg White / Wellcome 2014

Prizes and publicity

Images will be shortlisted and then winners chosen by a panel of high-profile judges.

The winner of each category will receive £1,250, with the overall winner receiving a prize of £15,000. Prizes will be presented at an awards ceremony in London on 3 July 2019.

All the winning and shortlisted entries will go on show in a major public exhibition at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 4-13 July 2019.

If you’re a winner, we will also offer you opportunities to take part in events to showcase your work to a range of audiences. Our winning images receive extensive international media coverage each year.

The winner of the Medicine in Focus category will be invited to produce the Julie Dorrington commission, a photo story exploring and documenting a patient’s journey with their condition.

Judges panel

The judges for the 2019 prize are:

  • Emma Bowkett, Director of Photography at FT Weekend Magazine, UK

  • Dan M. Davis, Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester, UK

  • Dr Heidi Larson, Director of The Vaccine Confidence Project at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

  • Joanne Liu, International President of Médecins Sans Frontières, Switzerland

  • Pete Muller, National Geographic Photographer and Fellow, Kenya

  • Azu Nwagbogu, Curator at Large for Photography at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, South Africa

  • Chair: Jeremy Farrar, Director, Wellcome, UK.


Entries to the Wellcome Photography Prize 2019 will be accepted on its website which contains full terms and conditions for entry. The deadline for entries is 17 December 2018.

Wellcome Photography Prize 2019 exhibition will open at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 4 to 13 July 2019. Entry will be free and open to all.

Sign up to Wellcome Photography Prize emails.

Follow on Instagram: @WellcomePhotoPrize #WPP19


Source: https://wellcome.ac.uk/what-we-do/our-work...

Submissions open for third annual Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award, photography bursary worth more than £3,000

Deadline: 19 October 2018

Who can apply: An early-to-mid-career photographer in or from the UK

The award: £2,000 to undertake a narrative photography project with a social or political context; approx. £1,000-worth of printing at Metro Imaging; support from the Trust towards public and industry exposure of the work; membership of Shutter Hub.

How to apply: Full submission information at www.rebeccavassietrust.org

Judges include: Matthew Tucker (BBC News); Melanie Hough (Getty Images); Jennifer Thatcher (Art Monthly).


The Rebecca Vassie Trust today announces the third annual Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award for emerging photographers ‒ with the cash bursary increasing this year from £1,250 to £2,000.

In addition to the cash, which funds an early-career photographer in the UK to undertake a narrative photography project, the winner receives more than £1,000-worth of printing at Metro Imaging plus support towards industry and public exposure.

Judges for the award include Matthew Tucker (BBC News), Melanie Hough, curator at Getty Images, and photography critic Jennifer Thatcher (Art Monthly, ARTnews).

The award was created in memory of Rebecca Vassie, a British photographer and photojournalist who died suddenly, aged 30, while on assignment in Uganda in March 2015.

Applicants for the award, who must be either from or based in the UK, are asked to submit a proposal setting out a compelling vision for a narrative photography project with a social or political context. The deadline for submissions is Friday, 19 October 2018.

Previous awards have been won by James Arthur Allen (2017) and Kirsty Mackay (2018). Allen used his award to travel to Israel, where he spent time documenting the little-known ethnic Circassian population. The resulting work has been exhibited in London, published in a limited-edition booklet and in the Calvert Journal, and shortlisted for the RPS International Photography Exhibition 161 and the 2018 Kolga Tbilisi Photo Festival Documentary Series Award.

Mackay is currently in Glasgow completing her award-winning project The Fish That Never Swam, exploring the relationship between health, housing and human lives in the city.

In addition to the main winner, the Trust offers shortlisted candidates support-inkind such as networking opportunities and online exhibition. The winner and up to two runners-up also receive membership of Shutter Hub.

Kelly Vassie, a trustee of the charity and the sister of Rebecca, said: “We have been able to increase the cash portion of the award this year thanks to the fundraising efforts and generosity of our supporters. We especially want to acknowledge the incredible effort of our 2018 London Marathon charity runner Rebecca Moore.

“As we enter the third year of the award, we’re hugely excited to see a fresh wave of compelling ideas.”

Contact information:

Further information or comment:

Adam Barnard on 07850-217 399 or hello@rebeccavassietrust.org

www.rebeccavassietrust.org

Twitter: @vassietrust

Instagram: VassieTrust

Facebook: www.facebook.com/RebeccaVassieTrust

From the series  Adiga: Circassians in Israel  by James Arthur Allen

From the series Adiga: Circassians in Israel by James Arthur Allen

Hanna-Katrina Jedrosz - The Royal Photographic Society Environmental Bursary grant winner

We recently interviewed London College of Communication graduate and Photo Scratch co-founder Hanna-Katrina Jędrosz about the Environmental Bursary grant she received from The Royal Photographic Society. She also introduces us to the first chapter of her resulting body of work.

We hope you enjoy reading through Hanna-Katrina's thoughts on applying for opportunities like those from The Royal Photographic Society.


Tell us about the bursary you received from The Royal Photographic Society. In 2016 I received the Environmental Bursary awarded by The Royal Photographic Society and The Photographic Angle. I won in the Under 30 category, and I was awarded jointly with Carl Bigmore who I collaborated with on the first chapter of the project.

A fjord leading out to the Barents Sea, Norway, at the very northern end of the European Green Belt.

A fjord leading out to the Barents Sea, Norway, at the very northern end of the European Green Belt.

Tell us about the work it allowed you to make. What's the work about? Is it complete? The bursary enabled us to make a major body of work about the Fennoscandian section of the European Green Belt. The European Green Belt is an area of land that spans the breadth of Europe from the Barents Sea to the Black and Adriatic Seas. It traces the boundary of the former Iron Curtain from north to south. For nearly five decades, this space was an out-of-bounds no-man’s land dividing east from west. This corridor enabled wildlife to flourish. Today much of the route is connected through national parks, biospheres and nature reserves. The project aims to explore and document the interplay between human activity and wildlife on a specific but vast stretch of land that comprise the European Green Belt, and in turn, how nature has reclaimed the land during and since the Cold War era.

The first chapter of the project is complete and I have just returned from making the next phase in Poland, Germany and the Czech Republic. There will be another trip later this year across the Balkans and Turkey which will comprise the final chapter.

In the gift shop at the Norwegian/Russian border.

In the gift shop at the Norwegian/Russian border.

What did winning the grant mean to you and your work? Winning the grant from The RPS was such an honour. It’s an organisation with a long and established history and they have supported thousands of photographers over many years. It felt like a vote of confidence in my work and in the idea.

Though it wasn’t publicly announced until the award ceremony in September 2016, it was shortly after the EU Referendum that we received news that we had won the backing to make this project. It felt very timely. On a personal level I felt disturbed by the results of the referendum. Receiving news of the bursary at that particular juncture provided a genuine sense of hope. It felt like an opportunity to channel some of the feeling of chaos I was experiencing into making work that would involve traversing the European continent, crossing many borders, encountering different people and places, and being given an opportunity to create something hopeful.

Lichen is an indicator of air quality. This leafy lichen, photographed in Finland near the borderzone with Russia, is leafy and indicates that the air was very clean.

Lichen is an indicator of air quality. This leafy lichen, photographed in Finland near the borderzone with Russia, is leafy and indicates that the air was very clean.

What encouraged you to apply for the Environmental Bursary in particular? It was the idea more than anything that lead to this application. It was Carl who suggested applying for this particular bursary when I told him about the idea. The Environmental Bursary seemed like a good fit for the project. I had never particularly considered myself to be a landscape or environmental photographer. I’m interested in connections between people and places, histories of the land and environment, the presence of history and the impact of a place on human experience.

A river melts near Möhkö, eastern Finland.

A river melts near Möhkö, eastern Finland.

What support did you receive? I received the financial backing to bring the project into being. We pitched the first chapter of the work which would see us travelling from Norway, through Finland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - the Fennoscandian and Baltic sections of the Green Belt. The support meant we could buy the film stock, book the flights, make the trip and get back in once piece. It simply would not have been possible without this kind of grant.

On top of this practical financial support, I have felt very supported by The RPS and, in particular by the Education Manager Liz Williams. She has provided letters of endorsement, helped me to connect with people in the industry and has been a really positive influence throughout the process of making the work.

A viewing platform to observe birds and wildlife on the Baltic Coast, in Narva-Jõesuu, Estonia.

A viewing platform to observe birds and wildlife on the Baltic Coast, in Narva-Jõesuu, Estonia.

Give one positive and one negative in regards to applying for opportunities like these. There is no negative to applying for opportunities like these! What’s the worst that could happen? If you aren’t successful, you will have gone through a process which hopefully has helped to clarify your intentions and thoughts, and will make your next application even stronger. It can help to identify gaps in your knowledge too. If you are lucky enough to receive funding then that is of course wonderful and a huge opportunity to get on and make your work. The RPS application form itself, at the time that I applied, was reassuringly straightforward.

Every grant comes with a sense of responsibility to do the work justice and seize the opportunity. It’s a good idea to have an awareness of the organisation or funder’s motivation for offering the funding. Be prepared to fulfil obligations to your backers, like supplying images when the project is completed within a specific time frame.

In the abandoned ex-Soviet military town of Skrunda-1, Latvia.

In the abandoned ex-Soviet military town of Skrunda-1, Latvia.

Writing a budget can be challenging because sometimes you might not know exactly how much you would need, or there are variables. My advice would be to keep it simple and include a contingency of 10-15%. Be prepared to save up some of your own money to cover unexpected costs. I have never made a project without working really hard to save up for it first, even with external funding. Before going away to make the first part of this project last year, I worked six day weeks for six months (a combination of freelance photography jobs and picture editing shifts at two different organisations) just so that I wouldn’t come back and be completely overdrawn. More established photographers may not require this, but with relatively few years (five) working professionally, as well as the costs associated with living in London, and photographing on film, this is how I have managed.

With any endeavour, ultimately it’s your decision to be committed to a project and then do whatever you need to do to make it happen. Having external funding is a huge initial enabler that paves the way for you to then fulfil the opportunity to its full potential.

A Baltic Beach on the Curonian Spit, Lithuania.

A Baltic Beach on the Curonian Spit, Lithuania.

Can you give any advice to those considering a submission to any of The Royal Photographic Society opportunities?

When applying for funding, and in no particular order…

Ask for help if you need it.

Be professional.

Be reliable.

Look at what has been funded in recent years and don’t repeat an idea.

Be bold.

Be clear. Don’t be ambiguous or try to sound academic or mysterious for the sake of it.

Trust your own voice.

Be honest about your idea - what are the challenges? What are your strengths?

And most of all: apply! Someone once told me they allocated a day a month to apply for funding, residencies and other opportunities. I don’t manage to be as organised as this but I do allow myself time to do applications, time to discover and articulate ideas, and cast the net.

The Royal Photographic Society announces 2018 bursaries across still and moving image

 
Image by  Cebe Loomis , Postgraduate bursary winner 2017

Image by Cebe Loomis, Postgraduate bursary winner 2017

 

Let The RPS realise your photography dream…

The Royal Photographic Society has announced this year’s bursaries to help photographers and students alike develop, finance and realise projects across the still or moving image.

Recipients can use the funding for aspect such as travel, equipment, website or mounting an exhibition. Michael Pritchard, Chief Executive of The Royal Photographic Society, explains: “The Society’s bursary programme is an important part of our educational activities, allowing photographers to realise important and worthwhile projects. Many of those it has supported in the past have gone on to establish respected careers and the Society continues to support and maintain contact after those initial projects have been completed.”

2017 Postgraduate bursary winner, Cebe Loomis from Santa Cruz in the USA, explains: “Thanks to the Society I was given the opportunity to create a dynamic body of work that would greatly contribute to the professional field of photography including the funding of my fieldwork in Virginia City, Nevada, as well as begin designing the book that will soon house the complete project, Tailings. 

Being awarded this prestigious bursary has given me the resource to pursue my project to its fullest capacity. From travel support for months of fieldwork, to funding the purchasing and developing my 120mm and 35mm film, this bursary has been invaluable in a number of ways. Additionally, to have the encouragement of the Society is invigorating and I feel proud and inspired to continue creating and exploring the field of photography.”


Details for the 2018 bursaries are as follows:

Environmental Awareness Award

Two annual bursaries in partnership with The Photographic Angle -

£3000 towards a photographic project to support environmental awareness.

Applications close 29 May 2018.

 

Joan Wakelin Bursary

Annual bursary offered in partnership with The Guardian -

£2000 for the production of a photographic essay on an overseas social documentary issue.  Photo essay published in The Guardian and RPS Journal.

Applications close 18 May 2018.

 

RPS Postgraduate Bursary

Annual bursary of £3500 in support of a postgraduate student studying in the UK or abroad.

Applications close 29 June 2018.

 

RPS DepicT! Award

DepicT! challenges filmmakers on any budget from anywhere in the world to show their work in just 90 seconds. The RPS supports Main Award of £1500 and Cinematography Award of £1000. 

Applications close 2 July 2018.

 

All photography bursaries (excluding DepicT!) benefit from an additional £500 worth of equipment from Vanguard and the opportunity to have a portfolio printed by Metro Imaging.  All bursary projects will be published in the RPS Journal.

For more information about funding and bursaries please visit http://www.rps.org/learning/project-funding

For further press information including images and interview requests please contact Caroline Hook, Marketing & Communications Manager, on direct tel: (01225) 325 799 or email: caroline@rps.org 

Unveil'd Photobook Award 2017 - Submissions now open!

 
2016 winner | Blokovi | Lola Paprocka [UK]  Exhibition | Centrespace | Bristol | April 2018

2016 winner | Blokovi | Lola Paprocka [UK]

Exhibition | Centrespace | Bristol | April 2018

 

Unveil'd Photobook Award is an international competition with the aim to support and promote the publications of emerging and established photographers. 

Each submission is added to a permanent collection which is exhibited and viewable to the public at Unveil'd events. 

- The award is open to all photobooks, artist books, catalogues or zines 

- Submissions must be primarily based on photographic content 

- The date of publication must be after 31 October 2016

Unveil'd will work together with the winning photographer or author to produce a fully funded solo exhibition within our 2018/19 programme. The focus is to create a flexible environment that responds to the winner's practice and best supports the development of their work. 

A shortlist of five titles and one winner will be announced 5 February 2018.

About the Panel

Jessica Lennan | Unveil'd Photobook Lead, Lecturer & Co-director of artist's studio and exhibition space Dodo Photo

Robert Darch | Unveil'd Project Coordinator, Photographer, Educator & Co-director of Dodo Photo

Tom Coleman | Unveil'd Founding Director

Oliver Udy | Photographer, Lecturer & Publisher, Antler Press

Lola Paprocka | Unveil'd Photobook Award 2016 Winner & Publisher, Palm*

Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award Submission Call

An exciting new award has recently been announced in aid of supporting emerging photographers. The Rebecca Vassie Memorial Award is an opportunity that we think will be great for many of you Photograds out there, so read on to find out more! We'll be featuring the winner of the award on the site and we can't wait to see the work! Good luck everyone...

The award is a bursary of £1,200, plus printing, exhibition and mentorship, for an emerging photographer in the UK to complete a narrative photography project.

Judges for the award include Karen McQuaid, curator at The Photographers’ Gallery, Matthew Tucker, UK Picture Editor at BuzzFeed, and Bette Lynch, Director of Photography, news, Europe, Middle East and Africa at Getty Images.

Premier printing services are being donated by Metro Imaging, who will also grant the winner a portfolio review with creative director Prof. Steve Macleod.

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     National Gas Turbine Establishment (Pyestock) which closed in 2000, by Rebecca Vassie

National Gas Turbine Establishment (Pyestock) which closed in 2000, by Rebecca Vassie

The award is created in memory of Rebecca Vassie, a British photographer and photojournalist who died suddenly last year (March 2015), aged 30, while on assignment in a refugee camp in Uganda.

Applicants for the award, who must be either from or based in the UK, are asked to submit a proposal setting out a compelling vision for a photography project with a strong social or political context. The deadline for submissions is Friday, 7 October 2016 at 1700 BST.

The winner will receive a grant of £1,200, plus access to premier printing services at Metro Imaging, including consultation with a master printer, to create of selection of framed images for exhibition in London in March 2017, as well as portfolio prints. 

For more information on Rebecca's career, the award, and how you can apply, please visit here: rebeccavassietrust.org

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     LGBT Pride 2014 Entebbe, UGANDA, by Rebecca Vassie

LGBT Pride 2014 Entebbe, UGANDA, by Rebecca Vassie

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     Refugees from South Sudan for UNICEF   by Rebecca Vassie

Refugees from South Sudan for UNICEF by Rebecca Vassie