Milda Books presents the photobook "Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country" by Georgs Avetisjans

Milda Books presents the photobook Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country by University of Brighton graduate Georgs Avetisjans at the Photo Publishers Market organised by Brighton Photo Fringe and Photoworks.

Phoenix Brighton, October 20th - 21st. 11am - 5pm.


“Landscapes – actual, remembered or idealized – feed our sense of belonging to whatever place, region or nation that we view as homeland.”

Liz Wells
Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country (2015-2018)
is a multi-layered photographic narrative in a form of a photobook with cross-references like hyperlinks to additionally inserted stories connected to the subjects and landscape. The book is about the village where my Armenian-Greek father once had a dream to build a house for our family, but unfortunately couldn’t finish it as he passed away when I was only 6 months young.

The project explores the sea, the land and memories, how the time affects and changes our sense of a place at the same time serving a nostalgic representation of the village in Latvia - Kaltene and its recent history from World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 via interviews, notes and archival imagery. As the Iron curtain fell, the local economy changed and upon joining the EU in 2004, it changed again. These historical shifts made a huge impact on the society and its dreams, many of which the younger generations have abandoned.

The place is located between the forest and the sea about 100 km northwest of the capital Riga. In the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th century it was the second most productive village in the country as 55 seagoing sailing ships were built there.

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Images from the series  The Longest Village in the Country  by Georgs Avetisjans

Images from the series The Longest Village in the Country by Georgs Avetisjans

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Revolv Collective presents 4UZHBINA

Preview: 29th September, 6:00pm – 9:00pm

Open daily: 30th September – 29th November, 11:00am-5:00pm

Venue: Phoenix Gallery, 10-14 Waterloo Place, Brighton BN2 9NB


Revolv Collective invites you to The Collective’s Hub, part of Brighton Photo Fringe taking place at Phoenix Brighton from Saturday 30th September to Sunday 29th November 2018.

4uzhbina is a photographic installation, created collaboratively by the artists Krasimira Butseva and Lina Ivanova, for Brighton Photo Fringe 2018. The word ‘4uzhbina’ describes a non-existent place, an illusory location, which cannot be found on any map, nevertheless it could be accessed by anybody. It is simply an invention of the tongue, existing only in the spoken and written Bulgarian language. The term contains simultaneously the essence of a no-man’s land and a dolce vita. 

In her new work, Krasimira Butseva uses moving image and appropriates found photography and materials, entangling personal and fictional histories. In her short film, she remembers the day, in which Bulgaria was accepted in the European Union, while performing repetitive rituals and readings. Using a found family archive originating from Kent, Krasimira plays with connotation and denotation, shaping a completely new narrative out of the photographs. Through this body of work, she explores the way in which politics inform nations and form identities, along with the correlation between native roots and cultural routes.

Lina Ivanova’s autobiographical piece explores issues of representation, identity and status of the migrant in the birth country. Photography becomes a power tool to remember, to store memories and experiences and possess a space, in which one feels insecure.  The manipulation of family archival records creates a personal interpretation of one’s own origin. The use of alternative processes suggests the transition from a state of familiar to a state of the foreign. Fragile family photos are reproduced on the surfaces of domestic objects and removed from their expected setting providing a context of the every-day in a moment of return. 

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Events

4UZHBINA: Artist talk 

20th October 2018 (Saturday)
1:00pm – 2:00pm

The founders of Revolv Collective, Krasimira Butseva and Lina Ivanova will form a dialogue about methods of using found photography and objects, alongside alternative processes to create new bodies of work. Reflection on current work on display at the Collective’s Hub, will lead to a discussion about belonging and identity. 

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Routes OR Roots

27th October 2018 (Saturday)
12:00pm – 2:00pm

Routes OR Roots invites participants to take part in a two-hour long workshop delivered by Revolv Collective. The activities encompassing notions of belonging and the self, welcomes participants to contribute to the workshop with personal objects, photography and memories in order to form a narrative of personal and collective diaspora. The workshop is open to people from any age and background to join.

[City] Stories - Urban photography exhibition

WORLDWIDE COLLECTIVE OF URBAN PHOTOGRAPHERS STAGE EXHIBITION AT FOUR CORNERS IN BETHNAL GREEN

13 urban photographers from Goldsmiths are opening their MA Degree Show at Four Corners gallery from 3rd-6th October 2018, including an exclusive lecture from Danish photographer Lene Hald.

The exhibition will feature new work made as part of the Photography & Urban Cultures MA at Goldsmiths, University of London, exploring the creative interplay between urban theory and the visual representation of cities & communities.

Coming from all over the world, the artists featured share their take on the contemporary life of the city, informed by urban theory and sociological research.


 
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3rd - 6th October, Four Corners Gallery (London), part of Photomonth

10th - 14th October, Phoenix Brighton, part of Brighton Photo Fringe

Private View - 4th October, 6-9pm - register here

Urban Photographer's Association Annual Lecture by Danish photographer Lene Hald - 5th October, 4-5.30pm

Artist's Panel & Urban Photo Walk - 6th October, 2-4.30pm

*All events are free.


Co-curator Becky Morris Knight commented:

“As global urbanization speeds up and our political and media environments become more fragmented, exploring and examining how we live together becomes an urgent task and one which artists can make a valuable contribution to.”

“The work we make is informed, inspired and underpinned by sociology and urbanism, helping us to create meaningful images which speak to important issues our society faces, such as gentrification, media censorship, the body, identity and class.”

About the exhibition

Ting-Ling Yu shares a delicate exploration of nudity and public decency in London, while Yihong Wu’s work offers a consideration of typical interiors in China through carefully composed medium format images.

Image by Steve Jones

Image by Steve Jones

Other projects include Steve Jones’ forensic examination of the staircase as a shaper of architectural space and Henry Woodley’s personal journey through the waterways of London and the communities of boaters he lives alongside.

Image by Henry Woodley

Image by Henry Woodley

Artist Shan Ye worked in green spaces in London to think about how citizens in a wealthy country use their leisure time. Bo-Cheng Liu took inspiration from the margins, walking over 100km to explore the liminal land between airports and the city, often overlooked and unconsidered.

Image by Becky Morris Knight

Image by Becky Morris Knight

Becky Morris Knight approached the idea of how our online spaces influence our urban lives, with a series which looks at how censorship works on Instagram and what that might look like if applied to our cities.

Image by Qiunan Li

Image by Qiunan Li

Taking a personal approach, Mia Irmgard Klit will be launching an innovative photobook which challenges conventional approaches to medical sociology by exploring her sister’s experience of coma. Qiunan Li is also looking at memory and individual experience in his project in which he picks out images he cannot remember making and creates a new narrative from them.

Image by Lee Gavin

Image by Lee Gavin

Lee Gavin will be showing a series of portraits which investigate class, life milestones and identity, while Korean photographer Suhyuk Chai shares images made within a transient community on the Trans-Siberian Railway.

Image by Lorena Sanchez Pereira

Image by Lorena Sanchez Pereira

Kat Huber’s poetic work captures a fleeting moment within the landscape, layering the past, present and future in images of a derelict fairground slated for renewal in Berlin. Also considering a landscape in flux, Lorena Sanchez Pereira creates large-scale images exploring the regeneration of Hackney Wick in her series Gentricity.

Special Events

The exhibition also has a series of special events taking place throughout the run, kicking off with the Private View on 4th October, 6 – 9pm.

Danish photographer Lene Hald will fly in to deliver the Urban Photographer’s Association Annual Lecture on the 5th October, 4-5.30pm in the Four Corners gallery.

Titled Photography, care and co-creation, the talk will set off in Hald’s own photographic work, which is situated in the intersection of photography, visual storytelling, social engagement and participatory practice.

On Saturday 6th October, urban photographer and Director of Urban Photo Fest, Paul Halliday, will be chairing a panel discussion with 3 of the artists from the exhibition, considering the role photography can play in generating new knowledge of the urban.

After it closes in London, [City] Stories will transfer to Phoenix Brighton as part of Brighton Photo Fringe, from 10th – 14th October.

www.citystorieslondon.com

https://twitter.com/citystorieslon1

https://www.instagram.com/citystorieslondon/

Photohastings exhibition opportunity

Photohastings in collaboration with Brighton Photo Fringe open submissions to 'Not the Final Major Project' to recent photography graduates.

Be in with the chance of exhibiting at Hastings Arts Forum 2nd - 18th October.

Submissions close Friday 20th July.

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Contact Sarah French with enquiries.

Jack Stocker - 'Members Only'

As part of our current Photobook Spotlight we interviewed Graphic Design graduate Jack Stocker about his route into photography and photobook, Members Only.


You studied Graphic Design at university but projects that you ended your final year on were photography based. Can you tell us how and why you turned to photography to express your ideas? I’d always been into photography and used it as a way to document holidays and events, like most people, but in terms of using it when studying graphic design, I always felt like it was something separate. I felt that if the majority of a project was photography then it wouldn’t be classed as graphic design. Towards the end of my second year and start of third year, my tutors helped me realise that I can use my photography in my design and it still be a graphic designer. One of our projects in third year was to document a subject for 2/3 weeks and I chose to photograph a local remote control racing car club, from which I created an interesting photo essay which I later made into a book.

What attracted you to the working mens clubs in Middlesborough? Why did you decide to make this series of work? When we started planning what our final major project would be, I wrote a list of previous projects I did and enjoyed. I noticed a theme between 2 or 3 of them and that was that they were all based on the working class. I started thinking and realised that Working Men’s Clubs could be a great opportunity to document using my photography. I hadn’t ever been in a WMC but i knew what they were and I knew what they looked like and from what I already knew, I loved their aesthetic and the reasoning behind them. The further research I did, the more I wanted to do it for myself, but also for the clubs.

From the series  Members Only

From the series Members Only

What encouraged you to create a photobook to complete this series? I’ve always enjoyed buying photography books, or any visual book for that matter, and with the equipment and resources at the University of Brighton it was a great opportunity to create a nice, well thought out photobook that helped reflect what I learnt when being at the WMC’s as well as the clubs era and feel. Also, the design of the book and how the book looked was how my graphic design skills played it’s part in the project.

How did you go about making your photobook? Have you got any tips or advice? I had the spreads printed locally and then hand stitched 2 copies. Both are identical and they have hard bound covers with gold foiled titles as well as an additional wrap around cover.

These weren’t the first books I’d made. I’d made quite a few before them and a few black and white copies of this version as there's lots of room for mistake, so I’d say practicing and planning is definitely needed before the final version. 

From the series  Members Only

From the series Members Only

Are there any stand out photographers who influence your work? Todd Hido, Joel Meyerowitz, Martin Parr, Andre Wagner, Bruce Gilden, JH Engstrom, Joshua Gordon, plus many more.

What equipment did you use to make this work? Do you think your choices reflect your way of working? I used two 35mm cameras, the Contax G1 and Contax T2 which definitely led to more planning and thought when taking the shots. As you’re paying out for film, it makes you appreciate every photo you take a little bit more, unless you’ve got a bottomless pit of film or money. I recently bought a compact digital camera as I’m hoping it will let me have a bit more freedom when shooting and traveling instead of worrying if the photo is worth a space on a roll of film.

From the series  Members Only

From the series Members Only

What are your future plans? I currently work as an In-House Graphic Designer while practicing my photography outside of work as a hobby and with any freelance opportunities that come up. I hope to continue developing as Graphic Designer and keep my photography involved throughout.

On the Radar: June 2017

Welcome to Photograd's brand new 'On the Radar' blog series. On an irregular basis we'll bring you some interesting stories and events from the photography industry. If you want to feature in the next post, simply email us using the heading 'On the Radar' with your information and we'll squeeze in the most exciting stories.


Starting Out: Conference for Photography Graduates

10:30am – 5:00pm, Tuesday 4th July

Direct Photographic, 200-202 Hercules Road, Lambeth, London SE1 7LD

FREE for AOP members, £5 for non-members (booking essential)

Another fantastic one day conference specially tailored for those embarking on a career in photography. You’ll hear from a great panel of speakers sharing their knowledge to help you make that leap to assisting photographer and beyond into professional photography.

Speakers include:

Cassie Gale from Lisa Pritchard Agency, Cassie will talk about how photographer’s agents work, how you might get an agent, and explain what LPA Futures is all about

Top advertising photographer and AOP member Kelvin Murray will talk about his staggering career and life as a photographer

Emma Taylor AOP Membership Officer and creative consultant will give some practical advice for emerging photographers on how to market yourself

AOP Assisting Photographer member Will Corder will talk about his experiences as an assistant, stories of starting out in his career, explaining the dos and don’ts and everything he has leant along the way

AOP Business and Legal Advisor Nick Dunmur will explain copyright and how to protect yourself as a photographer

Please join us, booking is essential: 

BUY TICKETS HERE

 
Sian Oliver , Norwich University of the Arts graduate, 2016

Sian Oliver, Norwich University of the Arts graduate, 2016

 

Millennium Images, Peaches and Cream

 
 

Peaches and Cream is a photography competition and exhibition run by Millennium Images. This year the competition seeks more then ever to celebrate the photographic arts, with a key focus in showcasing emerging photographers.

Click here to find out more and how to make a submission - entries open until 31st July.


Artist Talk: Martin Seeds

Assembly  installation image,  Martin Seeds

Assembly installation image, Martin Seeds

University of Brighton graduate Martin Seeds, featured on Photograd here, is talking at Phoenix Brighton on Monday 3rd July. Martin studied in the city and has exhibited at Brighton Photo Fringe a number of times.

Click here for event details.


Khadija Saye Memorial Fund

Khadija Saye

Khadija Saye

Khadija Saye very sadly lost her life in the Grenfell Tower fire in London earlier this month. Some of you might only know of Khadija from this tragic event, but we encourage you to read about the up and coming photographer. She's a real inspiration.

“Khadija was a true artist with a sensitive and generous singular vision, and will be missed by everyone who knew her. We have been inundated with messages of love and support over the last few days. 

On behalf of all of us involved in Khadija's Saye's life as an artist, we are setting up this Fund in memory of Khadija, to help others like her to pursue their passion as artists. In due course, we will establish a formal Fund and will make a decision together with those involved in Khadija's journey as an artist, and with professional partners within the cultural sector, about the best way to channel these donations for this cause. 

We will keep all donors informed of future developments. Thank you for your support.”

Click here to make a donation and find out more about the fund.

Silas Dominey - Superstition Winner

University: Brighton University, MA Photography

Websitewww.silasdominey.com

Artist Statement:

On the grounds of Bolton Priory there is a place called The Strid where the full breadth of the River Wharf is turned sideways through an unmapped tangle of underwater caverns.

While beautiful, it has a macabre history. At the narrowest point the river appears just wide enough to cross at a leap. Many who have tried slip and fall to their deaths. Years of erosion have channelled out an underwater tomb below. The bodies of the drowned rarely surface.

These photos are about this place and the unique qualities that make it so dangerous and alluring.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

The Striding Place: The initial brief for the series came from our Experimental Practice module. I grew up near the river Wharfe so the Strid was just something I’d always known about, but I didn’t realise the amount of history surrounding it until I started looking into it. The title is taken from a short horror story by Gertrude Atherton.

While making the work I was looking at British landscape photography like The River Winter by Jem Southam, but I think I was also influenced by more impressionistic stuff like Rinko Kawauchi. I shot the series on a few different cameras, some 120 film, some digital, and the studio work was done on a digital Hasselblad.

 
Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

 

University experience and MA at Brighton University: I did my BA at Leeds College of Art, which was a great experience. I was a little older than most when I started, so I think I was able to appreciate what a good environment it was to be in. After that I worked as an in-house photographer for a creative agency in Leeds, which was wonderful training for the technical side of things and the process of making images on a daily basis. I chose to study an MA because I felt like I’d let the critical thinking part of my brain lapse a bit. Brighton just seemed like a good place to be with the amount of photo related activity that goes on here, and the tutors and technical staff have been fantastic.

 
Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

 

Your work in general: I don’t think I could pin down my work very precisely at the moment. As an in-house photographer at an agency you’re often required to be a bit of a chameleon and adopt different styles for each job. The Striding Place was very experimental, and completely out of character for me, so right now I’m just trying to find a direction for my final project. 

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Superstition submission: I’d seen the Superstition competition on Twitter a few times before I realised I had a fitting body of work pretty much ready to go. It’s been a nice surprise, and quite hectic dealing with interview questions, etc. Winning something like this really forces you to have something to say about your work, I think often photography students have more trouble talking about their work than anything. I’m really happy to have won some prints from Spectrum, which will be a huge help with putting my final show together. My only advice for entering competitions is to be a bit savvy about the terms and conditions. Make sure you know what you’re getting in to, as there are a lot of disreputable rights-grabbing photo contests out there.