Homeland - an open call from Revolv

Publication & workshop by Revolv.

‘’Mud is sweeter in your homeland, than honey anywhere else.’’

We are seeking photography & writing from emerging artists and writers, responding to the theme Homeland to participate in a publication and a workshop. The meaning of home is in a state of flux - starting from the search for a better future to the displacement of individuals as a result of political and economic events.

Photography is a vital tool conserving and narrating the roots and routes which shape one’s journey. People become nomads, adapting to temporary residences and an unsettled lifestyle, wherever they happen to ‘dock’. While images can encapsulate seconds of the present, writing is capable of shining light on unspoken stories, repressed affairs and private accounts of the notion of home.

We would like to collect individual and intimate, global and collective experiences in relation to homeland, in order to present multiple ways of perceiving the idea of belonging.

Fifteen creatives will be selected to participate in a publication which will be supported by a one-day workshop taking place in New Cross, London. Homeland publication will also include the work of guest artist Dafna Talmor and Martin Seeds; the design and production will be in collaboration with Victoria Kieffer.

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Submission guidelines

In order to submit, you need to:

 1. Be an emerging lens-based artist working with digital, analogue and/or experimental photography OR an emerging writer who works with poetry, short stories or academic essays.

 2. Attend a daylong workshop on the 22nd of June in New Cross, London where ideas of the physicality and functionality of the publication will be developed further.

3. Although the open call is free of charge, selected artists and writers will be asked to contribute with £15 towards materials, production costs and the launch of the publication.

Photography

1. A series of up to 5 images

2. An artist statement up to 300 words

3. Short bio up to 150 words

Send everything in one pdf (up to 5mb) to info@revolv.org.uk by the 10th of June 2019.

Writing

1. Brief description of the writing up to 150 words

2. Writing up to up to 1500 words

3. Short bio up to 150 words

Send everything in one pdf (up to 5mb) to info@revolv.org.uk by the 10th of June 2019.



Introducing FORM

In this blog post we introduce you to FORM, a lens based collective who create and communicate on issues concerning altered identity. FORM are currently calling for work for an exhibition in Derby. FORM Fringe will coincide with FORMAT International Photography Festival 2019 which will consist of a series of exhibitions, events, and a photobook stall. Click here to find out how to submit. Deadline Sunday 24th February 10am and entry is free.


What is FORM? FORM is a collective of artists based across the UK who all work with photography. Our specialisms range from graphic design, creative writing, artist book making, event planning, product photography, socially engaged practice and teaching. Our core aim is to support the production of new projects by sharing skills, collaborating and creating a community of artists.

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Tell us about the members of FORM. Have you all studied photography? FORM is made up of Becky, Cath, Jo, June, Liz and Rachael. Becky and June both studied Photography at MA level, at London College of Communication and Westminster respectively. Jo also studied at LCC for her BA in Photography, and Rachael also studied BA Photography but at Manchester School of Art. Liz studied her BA in Brighton, which allowed her to produce image and text for her dissertation and Cath studied on a Creative Arts degree and now teaches Photography A Level.

Who or what motivates members to continue making new work? We all motivate each other, that’s one of the huge benefits of working as a collective. Photography can be very solitary, and even though we all produce work at different rates we all benefit from feedback from the rest of the group and having a deadline.

How did FORM come to the surface? We were established in response to Redeye, the Photography Network’s ‘Lightbox’ program; a creative development course where photographers are grouped into collectives and supported through talks, workshops and provided a mentor. FORM were matched with Nicola Shipley of Grain Photography Hub and since the program ended have continued to work together and with Nicola to make new work.

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What is the collectives biggest achievement to date? Our first exhibition together at Brighton Photo Fringe is the biggest project we’ve worked on to date. All of the members developed new projects responding to the title of ‘Form’ while organising the fundraising, curation and promotion of the exhibition. We were based in the Collectives Hub alongside some brilliant fellow collectives and projects and received some great feedback on the show.

Tell us about the conversations you produce for your website. What's your aim for them? The conversations started initially to informally introduce the members and give us all the opportunity to know each other better, but that format suits us perfectly because it represents how we want to work as a collective.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? If you like what we do please follow us on Instagram! FORM is currently looking to work with other photographers as part of the fringe at FORMAT International Photography Festival, details of this can be found on www.formcollective.co.uk.

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Give one tip to new photography graduates. Work with other creatives! Find people who you can work with to motivate each other, get honest feedback and collaborate with. Even if they aren’t a photographer, having someone to push you to keep making work and applying for opportunities is invaluable.

What does 2019 have in store for FORM? We have recently received Arts Council funding to produce work and exhibit in a fringe alongside the FORMAT International Photography Festival. We are all continuing to develop new work for more FORM exhibitions and events, and we want to meet and work with new people. We are also very excited about the launch of Landform, a platform for female landscape photographers run by Cath. Landform will be having their first events in 2019, and there will be plenty of opportunities to get involved in photo walks and socials this year.




A visual response to Brexit - the 3rd edition of PGZ

Submissions are now open to the third edition of PGZ. In this Brexit themed issue, photographers will reflect upon the current UK climate amidst our recent decision to leave the European Union.

We are looking for single images, bodies of work, and written pieces around the topic. Whether positive or negative, we are hopeful we can collate a reflection of the UK at this important, but also quite uncertain time. We’ve all felt the impact and our futures remain unpredictable. We are all in a huge state of change.

Previous editions of PGZ have been printed and saddle stitched, and we’ve sent these out to big names in the industry. This time around we’re creating a downloadable zine which we are hopeful can reach a wider audience. This also means we can include more photographers and spend less time on print quality and more time on promotion.

We’re excited to see where this project will lead.


We will also be selecting work from submissions received for website content based around this theme. If you’d like to be considered for website content only and not this edition of PGZ please state this in your email. There is no fee for website only content.

Submission guidelines

  • Submissions are free and open to photography graduates from UK courses only. No specific graduation year

  • A number of graduates will be selected from submissions received and will need to pay a small fee of £15 each

  • A maximum of 10 images need to be sent alongside your series title, website link, social media handles, and where you studied

Winning photographers: please note that not all 10 of your images will be selected, we will edit them down so if you have any preferences please state these in your initial email.

Selected images will be curated at the discretion of Photograd.

Submissions need to be sent to photogradpgz@gmail.com only.

Supporters

We’ve asked a number of industry professionals to come on board with this project and have listed a few names below. You might have the opportunity to be interviewed by one of these people for PGZ or your work may be selected because of them.

  • Chloe Juno - Brighton based photographer and creative consultant. Current long term photo project Someones Rubbish.

  • Joanne Coates - Photographer and founder of Lens Think; A social enterprise for equality in art with bi-monthly socials to meet, work, generate ideas, & develop arts in the North.

  • Hanna-Katrina Jedrosz - Documentary photographer and founder of Photo Scratch; an opportunity for documentary photographers to understand how their work is perceived and gain valuable insight into how to take their work further with the benefit of other people’s outside eye.

  • Tom Coleman - London based photographer, curator and producer, and founder of Unveil’d; commissioning, producing and promoting contemporary photography.

  • Alex Hewitt and Pauline Jérémie - The team behind Findr; supporting photographers and finding them work. They simplify the search and booking process of photographers for work by giving direct access through their platform.

  • Alex Ingram - University of the West of England, Bristol graduate and now London based freelance photographer. Alex’s work has been featured in various magazines and exhibitions across the UK, as well as having recently published his second book, David’s House.

…and more!

Selected

Those selected graduates for this edition of PGZ will:

  • Receive a free download of this issue

  • Receive a 50% off code to share with a friend or family member to download their own copy from the Photograd Shop

  • Be signed up to receive future opportunity emails from Photograd

  • Be part of the Photograd community with a copy of our logo for your site

DEADLINE

Midnight Monday 4th March 2019.

For those selected the deadline to then pay by will be Wednesday 13th March.


We will be creating a similar zine based around this theme later in the year so if you have work in progress which won’t make the deadline this time around, save it for our next submission process.

Featuring 2018 photography graduates

New Photograd content | Supporting 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses.

This summer Photograd are supporting a number of 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses through interviews, sharing of work, and promotion to a much wider audience. Selected from a recent call for work across social media were, in total, 12 new graduates who we are sharing the work of. We're appreciating some noticeable trends in photography over the last couple of years and new content on the Photograd platform brings you still life, responses to current affairs, exploration of family heritage, and industrial effects upon the landscape.


University of the West of England graduate Tom Roche presents his series Black Blood on the Photograd Spotlight in which he explores his own Romany Gypsy heritage through stories and speculation. We asked Tom about his university experience, his use of photography to find a sense of 'home', and his future plans, in particular how he will make Black Blood interestingly presented on the web.

The documentary collection of archival images, and both medium and large format prints, presented together provoke some interesting thoughts about family, heritage, and the future. 

Images from the series  Black Blood  by Tom Roche

Images from the series Black Blood by Tom Roche

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We selected Norwich University of the Arts graduate Holly Farndell to takeover the Photograd Instagram at the end of July with her documentary work.

"Golden Promise was created from Autumn through to Spring as a documentation of light and the changing of seasons. With a short escape from grey old England to sun-washed Spain, it is an observation of my experience with seasonal affective disorder and coping with the light and darkness of life."

You can follow along to find out more about Holly and her work from Sunday 29th July - Saturday 4th August.

Images from the series  Golden Promise  by Holly Farndell

Images from the series Golden Promise by Holly Farndell

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Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi presents us with her series SATIS on the Photograd Spotlight. In here interview, Caterina presents her still life images and accompanying video. Caterina takes inspiration from traditional still life paintings and intends to educate the viewer on certain current affairs. Each of her images are uniquely titled in Latin to give everybody the opportunity to decipher subject matter.

ABORTUS IURA  from the series  SATIS  by Falmouth University graduate  Caterina Lombardi

ABORTUS IURA from the series SATIS by Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi

OBSTETRICANTE VIOLENTIAM  from the series  SATIS  by Falmouth University graduate  Caterina Lombardi

OBSTETRICANTE VIOLENTIAM from the series SATIS by Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi

 

Nine highly commended 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses were also selected from this call for work to be represented on the Photograd blog. These bodies of work stood out to us for many reasons and we took this opportunity to share them.

Miguel Proença ,  The Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

Miguel ProençaThe Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

Luke Hurlock ,  Tokamak Fusion

Luke HurlockTokamak Fusion

Chiara Avagliano ,  Val Paradiso

Chiara AvaglianoVal Paradiso

University of Westminster graduate Luke Hurlock presents Tokamak Fusion which documents the current state of advancements in the field of nuclear fusion research. The word Tokamak comes from the Russian Toroidalnaya Kamera I Magnitnaya Katushka (Toroidal Chamber and Magnetic Coil) an is in reference to the fusion devices used by the leading fusion experiments. The images in this project aim to both intrigue and inform the viewer on the progress of a future technology that promises to solve one of humanity’s biggest problems, clean renewable energy production.

 

London College of Communication graduate Chiara Avagliano explores the places she grew up in Val Paradiso. "

The mountain scenery blends with the hills of the countryside colliding in a space inhabited by childhood memories, magical encounters, teenage adventures, mystical experiences, idealised love and a magical bond between girls that echoes ancient rituals and witchcraft. 

The fictional documentary work is a coming of age tale, retold from different points of view. 

Personal experiences are narrated and transformed, almost becoming legends whispered softly, from mouth to mouth, from me to my half-sister and her girlfriends."

Instagram Takeover winning graduate - Holly Farndell

We recently created a call for work specifically for those students graduating this year with the aim of rewarding a number of them with opportunities to be represented by Photograd. You can see our interview with University of the West of England graduate Tom Roche here, and our 9 highly commended graduates here. We're continuing to support 2018 graduates with a brand new edition of PGZ which is coming soon!

Here we present you a few images from Norwich University of the Arts graduate Holly Farndell who we selected from the submissions we received to takeover our Instagram. You can follow along to find out more about Holly and her work from Sunday 29th July - Saturday 4th August.


Golden Promise was created from Autumn through to Spring as a documentation of light and the changing of seasons. With a short escape from grey old England to sun-washed Spain, it is an observation of my experience with seasonal affective disorder and coping with the light and darkness of life.

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All images from the series  Golden Promise

All images from the series Golden Promise

Photohastings exhibition opportunity

Photohastings in collaboration with Brighton Photo Fringe open submissions to 'Not the Final Major Project' to recent photography graduates.

Be in with the chance of exhibiting at Hastings Arts Forum 2nd - 18th October.

Submissions close Friday 20th July.

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Contact Sarah French with enquiries.

Highly commended 2018 photography graduates

We recently created a call for work specifically for those students graduating this year with the aim of rewarding a number of them with opportunities to be represented by Photograd. You can see the full list of results here.

Here we present you with 9 highly commended 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses. Please click each image to read about the work.

 
Luke Hurlock,  Tokamak Fusion

Luke Hurlock, Tokamak Fusion

Jae Storer,  Riders of The City

Jae Storer, Riders of The City

Chiara Avagliano,  Val Paradiso

Chiara Avagliano, Val Paradiso

Laura Dow,  Flock

Laura Dow, Flock

Emma Stevenson,  Altered Lands

Emma Stevenson, Altered Lands

Paige Middleton,  Coastal Contamination

Paige Middleton, Coastal Contamination

Miguel Proença,  The Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

Miguel Proença, The Buzzer (ZhUOZ)

Stefania Kossakowska,  Her Name Is Polonia

Stefania Kossakowska, Her Name Is Polonia

Hannah Morgan,  Precious Fragments

Hannah Morgan, Precious Fragments

Photograd's Online Gallery

Officially launching on Friday 14th September 2018.

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  • Submissions via email only to photogradonlinegallery@gmail.com
  • Open to photography students and graduates from UK based university courses only. No exceptions.
  • A maximum of 10 JPG images at 96dpi and 12 inches on the longest side.
  • A series description of no more than 150 words should be supplied.
  • A website link and relevant social media handles should be included, alongside university and graduation year.
  • We ask that a small donation is made if images are selected for our online gallery to support the Photograd platform in moving forward.

For further terms and conditions to agree to before submitting please click here.

 

We are hopeful that in the future we will be able to invite guest curators to select work and for industry professionals to take a look at our online exhibitions. We may even run the occasional themed call out and some of the work might even make it to print for physical exhibitions, who knows. We are excited for what our new online gallery could turn into.

Supporting 2018 photography graduates - call out results

We're continuously seeking brand new talent here at Photograd and so of course the Summer months are our favourite time of year - it's degree show season!


We recently created a call for work specifically for those students graduating this year with the aim of rewarding a number of them with opportunities to be represented by Photograd.

The work we received was brilliant and the judging process was a tough one, but finally, the results are in..

The two 2018 photography graduates we are rewarding with a Spotlight feature are

  • Tom Roche and the series Black Blood - University of the West of England
  • Caterina Lombardi and the series SATIS - Falmouth University

The selected 2018 photography graduate we are rewarding with an Instagram Takeover is

  • Holly Farndell with the series Golden Promise - Norwich University of the Arts

The highly commended 2018 photography graduates who will appear on the Photograd blog are

  • Laura Dow with the series Flock - The University of Edinburgh (Edinburgh College of Art) 
  • Luke Hurlock with the series Tokamak Fusion - University of Westminster
  • Chiara Avagliano with the series Val Paradiso - London College of Communication
  • Jae Storer with the series Riders of The City - University of Suffolk
  • Hannah Morgan with the series Precious Fragments - Brighton University
  • Stefania Kossakowska with the series Her Name Is Polonia - University of South Wales
  • Emma Stevenson with the series Altered Lands - University of Westminster
  • Paige Middleton with the series Coastal Contamination - Coventry University
  • Miguel Proença with the series The Buzzer (ZhUOZ) - University of South Wales
 
Image from the series  Black Blood  by University of the West of England graduate    Tom Roche

Image from the series Black Blood by University of the West of England graduate Tom Roche

 
 
PUER NUPTAE  from the series  SATIS  by Falmouth University graduate  Caterina Lombardi

PUER NUPTAE from the series SATIS by Falmouth University graduate Caterina Lombardi

 

Dates for the release of interviews and blog posts are as follows

  • Spotlight interview with Tom Roche - Friday 29th June
  • Highly commended blog posts - Friday 6th July
  • Spotlight interview with Caterina Lombardi - Friday 27th July
  • Instagram Takeover by Holly Farndell - Sunday 29th July - Saturday 4th August

Zine & Photobook Fair 2018

Open Eye Gallery are currently calling for zines and photobooks

Submissions to charlotte.t@openeye.org.uk - deadline Monday 11th June.


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30 JUNE / FREE / 11AM – 4PM

Join Zine-makers, publishers and photographers for a free all-day celebration of rare, hand made and self published books, journals and zines from the North West and beyond. The event will be held on Saturday 30 June from 11am – 4pm in the bright, covered Mann Island atrium space outside of the gallery. This will be a free event open to established publishers and enthusiasts alike and will be a great opportunity to meet with both local and established artists in the publishing community.

To submit, or for more information, get in touch by emailing charlotte.t@openeye.org.uk with “Submission Zine & Photobook Fair” in the email subject. Please make sure to include a PDF of your publication along with a brief text for each book/print including:

  • Contact details
  • Front cover image
  • Content preview
  • Summary/description of work
  • Publication dimensions
  • Number of copies available
  • Retail and trade prices
  • Whether you plan to attend the fair as a seller

Due to the limited space, we may not be able to include all submitted work. To avoid disappointment, please get in touch before Monday 11 June and we will get back to successful applicants by Monday 18 June, when then selection process is complete.

Good luck and let us know if you're making a submission!

More details can be found here.

The second edition of PGZ - open to submissions!

Calling 2018 photography graduates. This one's open to you!


We're looking for 11 photography graduates from UK university courses to be part of the second edition of our zine, PGZ, which will launch Summer 2018.

To submit, email a series of work, 100 word description, university, and website to photograd2018@gmail.com only with the subject 'ZINE'.
Submission deadline: 11th July. Open to 2018 photography graduates from UK courses only.

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A big thank you goes to Spectrum for helping us to bring the second edition of PGZ to life.

Calling 2018 Photography Graduates

We want your work!

We’re looking to reward 2 photography graduates with an interview on the Photograd Spotlight and 1 graduate with an extended Instagram Takeover.

To submit, email a series of work, description, university, and website to photograd2018@gmail.com.
Submission deadline: 13th June. Open to 2018 photography graduates from UK courses only.

Image from the series  Utö  by Swansea College of Art - UWTSD 2018 graduate  Jasmine Färling

Image from the series Utö by Swansea College of Art - UWTSD 2018 graduate Jasmine Färling

Fiona Filipidis - To make a prairie

For the duration of March we were seeking work from photography graduates alongside Loupe Magazine to reward with a collection of prizes and interviews. A lot of time was spent looking through the submissions and decisions were finally made. Here we present you with our final runner-up!

Fiona Filipidis was born in Paris and later studied for a BA in Photography in France before moving to study for an MA at London College of Communication. We've interviewed Fiona here about the series To make a prairie.


To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,
One clover, and a bee,
And revery.
The revery alone will do,
If bees are few.

Emily Dickinson

Will revery alone really do if bees are few? As much as I love to daydream, I’m afraid the answer is a resounding, gut-wrenching ‘NO’. Bees are crucial to the continuation of human life. But our impact on the environment through the misuse of insecticides, added to the proliferation of pests and diseases and loss of habitat, is threatening the survival of this mighty insect. When bees have access to good nutrition, so do we – you can thank them for one in three bites of food you eat – and yet every batch of pollen has at least six pesticides in it.

From poetry to politics, religion to architecture, the honey bee has managed to waggle-dance itself into every nook and cranny of the human world. Our relationship with the bee is one that spans thousands of years, and I have attempted to synthesise it in one single book.

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

I divided this book into 6 chapters, each one edited in a specific way: a piece of writing is preceded by a full-page image and followed by a selection of images in relation to the text. The full-page images are of the stormy skies that descended over London on 16th October 2017, when hurricane Ophelia made her way to our shores. All I could hear and read at the time was “It’s the end of the world!” and I couldn’t help but find a parallel with what could potentially happen if bees were to become extinct. The texts are a mix of personal life experiences and detailed knowledge about the honey bee and its history in relation to us.

The imagery is a mix of found artefacts and my own photographs. Mingling the past with the present is my way of showing our constant and ever-growing relationship with the honey bee. My hope is that there is something for everyone in this book; if a teenager were to pick it up and see a photo of Beyoncé, I would love for it to peak their curiosity and push them to do a little bit of digging.

This project is more relevant now than ever. Every day, news articles emerge with ever-growing alarming headlines about bees and insects in general. We humans hold the fate of the wee honey bee in our millions of hands. By some unimaginable, intangible natural power, we have been given the gift of life, and it is our duty to make sure all living entities that share our cosmos continue on the path they were meant to take.

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

Can you introduce yourself? What and where did you study? What's your motto? I am a 28 year-old multicultural photographer who grew up in the leafy suburbs of Paris, France. My dad is half-French, half-Greek and my mum is half-English, half-Scottish. I have Portuguese relatives and grew up surrounded by friends from all over the globe, which I feel all greatly contributed to my openness and curiosity for the world. 

I studied for a BA in Photography in Paris before moving to the UK to pursue an MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication, from which I graduated this past January. 

I have never had to think about a motto before, but maybe “laughter is the best medicine”! I love a good chuckle. 

From the photobook  To make a prairie

From the photobook To make a prairie

Give us an overview of your work. What themes do you like to explore? My most recent projects are all related to nature and the environment in one way or another. Prior to To make a prairie, I was working on an image/text concept book called El Dorado which deals with the notion of gold in its broadest of meanings, whether it be physical or purely metaphorical, and What do you want to be when you grow up? which portrays our desire to reconnect with nature through a humorous, albeit slightly strange, depiction of my fantasized mother/daughter relationship with Phoebe, my favourite houseplant.

I always try to add an element of humour or levity to my projects and my writing, as I have come to realise that it helps people react to and interact with my work on a different level. I believe that you don’t always have to show the negative aspects of any given situation in order to bring awareness to it. I find the idea of talking about important issues contrasted with an underlying light-hearted tone to be a very interesting one that I would love to push further.

I recently came across an article written by Tim Davis on photogeliophobia, or the fear of funny photography, in which he states that, “The history of photography’s overall overseriousness starts to feel like a first date that can’t laugh at the ketchup he’s spilled in his lap.” And the combination of spilt ketchup and the noise the bottle makes while doing so is more often than not quite amusing.

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

What encouraged you to submit to the Loupe Magazine and Photograd call for work? Have you got any tips for photographers submitting work for similar opportunities? Getting your work out there is the tricky part upon graduating, as you want to use the momentum you’ve gathered throughout the year to propel you and keep pushing for your work to be seen. Photograd is the ideal platform to start, as you’re only a graduate once (or twice). I have been following the website for years now and have always been amazed by the quality of the photographic projects you choose to publish, and feel humbled to be in such great company. I am also excited whenever I come across new platforms such as Loupe Magazine, as I believe there can never be enough websites and magazines to showcase emerging talent. So the combination of both seemed perfect!

My main piece of advice would be to keep applying to calls and competitions, even if the constant rejections can cause you to lose hope (which I have lost on many occasions, but keeps returning again and again). I find being organised to also be very useful; I have monthly lists organised by closing dates on my desktop so that I know when I need to apply for calls, residencies, competitions, grants, and what to send.

From the photobook  To make a prairie

From the photobook To make a prairie

How did this series come to the surface? Why did you decide to make work around our relationship with bees? It was all very coincidental, really, as most projects usually are! I was chatting with one of my tutors from LCC, Morag Livingstone, about what I could work on next when she, quite bluntly, asked me, “What pisses you off and what brings you joy?”. I realised there and then that a natural theme underlined all of my answers, and she saw my eyes light up when I told her about hives being kept on rooftops in the middle of Paris. I had also, like many other people, received dozens of email petitions to “Save the Bees” but had never given them much thought. And I had been struck by a photograph that was doing the rounds on Facebook at the time, showing what the fruit and veg aisle of a supermarket would look like if bees were to become extinct. So I started my research and within a couple of days that was it, I was hooked, all I could think of were bees, bees, bees. In my book, I quote British beekeeper R. O. B. Manley who defines bee fever as “a form of insanity from which you never really recover”, and to my great delight I think I’ve caught the bug, too. 

From the photobook  To make a prairie

From the photobook To make a prairie

The outcome of To make a prairie is a photobook. Describe your book and particular layout of images. I divided To make a prairie into 6 chapters, each edited in a specific way: a piece of writing is preceded by a full-page image and followed by a selection of images in relation to the text. The full-page images are of the stormy skies that descended over London last October, when hurricane Ophelia made her way over here and people kept saying that it felt like the end of the world; I couldn’t help but find a parallel with what could potentially happen if bees were to become extinct. The texts are a mix of personal life experiences and detailed knowledge about the honey bee and its history in relation to us. And the pictures are a mix of found archival imagery and my own photographs. The image pairings are often comical and bounce off one another as I wanted to constantly excite the reader’s eye and not let it become accustomed to one type of image. My hope is that there is something for everyone in this book; if a teenager were to pick it up and see a photo of Beyoncé, I would love for it to pique their curiosity and push them to do a little bit of digging. As for the cover, the bee drawing was created by my cousin’s 5-year-old daughter, Caitlin. 

Was it important that you executed this work in the form of a photobook? Yes, I knew from the start that the final form of this project would be a book. I am an avid photobook reader, collector and admirer. I spend a good amount of time looking at sequencing, layouts, papers, binding techniques and feel genuine joy when I come across a book which excites both my eyes and my fingers! I had always wanted to make a book from start to finish, from the image making to the editing to the design of it, and saw this project as the perfect opportunity to do so. 

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

What are your future plans? I am currently trying to publish, or self-publish, To make a prairie, as well as working on a zine about a trip I took to California in February. In about a month’s time I will be doing a 3-week artist residency in northern Italy with Ardesia Projects and Jest, a photography gallery in Turin, which I am very excited about. And I will forever be working on researching bees in order to fully live up to my “bee-lady” image!

Photograd Print Swap

Would you like to own a print by another photography graduate? If that's a yes then read below.

Image by featured graduate  Mohamed Hassan

Image by featured graduate Mohamed Hassan

The very first Photograd Print Swap is open to photography graduates from UK based courses only and allows those involved to pick which print they'd like to receive on a first come first served basis.

Once image selections have been made a small £7 fee needs to be paid to cover handling and postage. Images are then uploaded to Photograd where they can be claimed before being posted to their new owner.

Submissions to photogradprintswap@gmail.com

Official guidelines can be found here.