Introducing Findr

In this blog post we introduce you to findr, a brand new platform supporting photographers and finding them work. They simplify the search and booking process of photographers for work by giving direct access through their platform.

Findr can help if you are a photographer or need a photographer!

 
 

What is findr? Findr is an online booking platform through which photographers can showcase their skills and find more work. It was created for photographers, by photographers who grew tired of the unnecessary struggles that come with marketing oneself, finding clients, and arranging bookings. Findr aims at making it easier for photographers to find work that fits around their schedules, while still respecting their independence and artistic freedom.

Who are you? What's your photographic background? I am a photographer and picture editor from Edinburgh. I worked in the press industry for 15 years. I particularly enjoy portraiture, and marketing and events photography that gives me the ability to tell stories for the clients.

How did the platform emerge? The platform emerged from the need to create a solution to an everyday problem I faced as a picture editor: how to quickly and simply find photographers I could trust to work on projects I was involved in.

Image by Harry Spekter

Image by Harry Spekter

Who's behind Findr? Tell us about the team. Findr is made of a small team of people dedicated to improving the landscape of commissioned photography. The technology is created by Ben, Josh, and Rob, while the operational excellence is handled by Alex, Christian, and Pauline. And, of course, we'd be nothing without the community of over 3,000 amazing photographers we're lucky enough already be working with!

Who would you ideally like to get involved with Findr? We're looking for hardworking, reliable, and creative photographers interested in accelerating or improving their careers and in working with a growing list of great brands through findr.

Image by Michael Sheridan

Image by Michael Sheridan

How can people go about being part of the platform? It's super easy and quick! Head over to www.findr.me and create your photographer profile. You can add your portfolio, all the services you offer, and manage your own schedule.

Who is Findr's audience? Findr is meant for a community of professional photographers and clients who love and benefit from good photography.

What are the benefits of being part of or using Findr? New work, new opportunities, so little hassle! By signing up to work with findr, you join a direct route to work without any of the hardships that come along with being a freelance photographer, and companies receive an efficient management system for their projects.

Image by Pooyan

Image by Pooyan

What does Findr's future look like? Here at findr, we love to dream big! Our goal is to become the global marketplace for professional photographers and customers on an international scale.

Follow findr on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Chris Mear. Five Years: A Reciprocal Tribute

Legacy: A Reciprocal Tribute is an artwork conceived by Patricia Swannell in response to The Woodland Trusts flagship Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee. Patricia’s artwork takes the form of a plinth, inviting local families to make an annual family photograph against the backdrop of the developing trees. Charting both the changes in their family and the changes in the landscape they collectively call home. Five years ago Staffordshire University graduate Chris Mear was commissioned to photograph this selected family in the same spot in Leicestershire each year. 2018 marks Chris's 5th year as the commissioned photographer.


I could agrue that 2014 was my most succesful year to date. I became an artist in residence, I published my first book and I landed a modest succession of commissions which just about saw me through the remainder of the year. It was, finally, the year that I could actually defend the claim that I was a “photographer” - a claim which I have to admit I’ve, more often than not, not had the confidence to defend. But when it all starts winding down and I’m sat in a tree looking back at my brief holiday on earth, I will most probably remember the year 2014 for one thing above all others - a commission that goes by the name of Legacy: A Reciprocal Tribute. A commission that, all being well, will see me well into what I’m told they used to call “retirement age”.

The London based, Canadian born artist, Patricia Swannell was asked to come up with a location based artwork for the Woodland Trust’s flagship commemoration of the Queen’s diamond jubilee in 2012 - that’s 60 years on the old thrown. Interestingly, what Patricia devised was a “photo point” in a carefully selected location within the wood - selected to compose people, trees and landscape. 

The idea was, to me at least, both beautiful, poigniant and simple. To chart the growth of yourself alongside the development of your family the woodland and the wider landscape.

Patricia also visited the woodland site in the early days of it’s post-industrial transition and collected 60 native plants and wildflowers from which she made 60 etchings to make up a permanent exhibition - which moves to a new home this autumn. Each year one of these etchings will be replaced by my portrait of the Martinson family, a local family who live just a pleasent evenings stroll away from the wood.

2014.jpg
2016.jpg
2015.jpg
2017.jpg

This Sunday evening will be the fifth exposure, the fifth year. And so far each time I have made that walk to the photo point I have been unable to prevent my mind from thinking to the future; what will this all be like in 60 years time? This year however, I intend to try extra hard to not venture though my mind in some ludicrous attempt to construct an imaginary future. My rabbit of almost seven years died this week and I hope to pay respect to my friend, my best friend, and teacher by beginning to practice his most important teaching; Life Is Now.

So I will experience the woodland for what it is, a wild place where the two Martinson boys are growing faster than the trees. A place of peace and natural unity which leaves you feeling a sense of hope and optimism in a world dominated by a species that all to often seems intent on losing its remarkable mind.

How lucky I am, to have been in such a right place, at such a right time to land a photography gig like this.

Photograd Catch-up Feature: Corinne Perry 'The Drawing Room Exhibition, at Oriel Davies Gallery'

We caught up with Birmingham City University graduate Corinne Perry, who is already featured on the Photograd platform here, to find out about her brand new commission. Alongside the Oriel Davies Gallery, Corinne has produced Looking Glass which she talks about here...

Project Description

I am a self-portrait photographer; creating intimate depictions that I feel are reflections of my natural melancholic temperament. Looking Glass is a site-specific self-portrait, which I was commissioned to produce for exhibit in The Drawing Room an exhibition at Oriel Davies Gallery, Wales. Using the medium of photographic self-portraiture, I have transformed a traditional wall mirror, with the placement of an ethereal depiction of an unknown woman upon its surface. 

 
Corinne Perry  Looking Glass  - the original image

Corinne Perry Looking Glass - the original image

 

Progression of Work

I began to produce the work as a result of being one of five emerging artists/makers who were awarded a ‘Seed Commission’ to support the creation of new work to furnish The Drawing Room.  I was aware the exhibition space was going to be transformed as to be reminiscent of a traditional drawing room. So I was drawn to the concept of redefining a traditional wall mirror with the use of photographic self-portraiture, as through the act of looking, the viewer would be able to see their reflection in that of its.

Since childhood I have been fascinated with the use of mirrors within fairy tales, as transformative objects of both enchantment and awe. Conceptually I wanted the viewer to feel they were looking at the ghostly reflection of a woman who once gazed upon the mirror.  I wanted the woman depicted upon the mirror, to have a fairy tale feel whilst retaining a haunting quality, and through the use of masquerade, transformed my identity into that of an unknown woman. 

The portrait was deeply influenced by the original depiction of Snow White, by The Brothers Grimm. I felt it was conceptually vital that the viewer could gaze into the eyes of the woman, and although I prefer to not include my face within my work, because of a sense of unease with self, when in character I felt able to do this.

 
Corinne Perry   Looking Glass  - a work in progress

Corinne Perry Looking Glass - a work in progress

 

The photograph has been mounted upon the glass using acetate in such a way that enables the viewer to view their reflection in that of hers. The work can be seen as not only stylised to suit the historical nature of my concept but also that of a ‘drawing room’ with its’ transient social gatherings and the ethereal imprints within this space. As my work is dominated by the concept of interior; in particular the depiction of my body in relation to my bedroom, the opportunity to produce work that focused upon a domestic space other than this deeply personal room felt like a natural progression of my previous work.

Exhibition

Working in collaboration with artists and the public, Oriel Davies Gallery, has created The Drawing Room, a curiously inviting room assembled from found, collected, and bespoke objects. From 22nd October to the 25th February 2017 The Drawing Room will be a creative social space, in which art, craft, performance and film will be made, shared and inspired.  

Corinne Perry   Looking Glass  - the finished piece

Corinne Perry Looking Glass - the finished piece

Future Plans

I believe the opportunity of being supported by Oriel Davies Gallery to produce Looking Glass has had a positive and developmental effect upon my practice. My future plans are to continue working on my series Wallflower which explores my ongoing struggle with depression. I hope to also explore the possibility of incorporating elements of installation within my self-portraiture, as to create a tactile and sensory viewing experience. 

Exhibition links:

http://openspace.orieldavies.org/en/whats-on/artists

http://www.orieldavies.org/en/exhibition/drawing-room

Photograd Catch-Up Feature: Caitlin Chescoe

Featured Photograd Caitlin Chescoe was commissioned by Brighton Photo Fringe this year to make a new body of work alongside their three emerging curators. We caught up with Caitlin recently to find out about her plans for the festival and then her experience of accepting a commission and being a part of this years event. Caitlin has since informed us of more about Kings House: In Transition and some of her influences when making the work. Continue reading to find out more...

Statement

As the offices of Brighton and Hove City Council since 1996, activity inside Kings House has shaped the face of the city. The imminent sale of the building and relocation of the Council offices has received much local press coverage, but less attention has been paid to the social histories of the site. Kings House: In Transition celebrates the people and stories that have shaped the life of the building by inviting members of staff to share their experiences. The exhibition features portraits and oral histories collected as the Council staff begin the process of relocating.

Kings House: In Transition  installation image by emerging curator, Sarah French.

Kings House: In Transition installation image by emerging curator, Sarah French.

Series Influences

I really love the work of portrait and documentary photographers such as Alec Soth, Stephen Shore, Nick Ballon, Jo Metson Scott and Kalpesh Lathigra who all use photographic film. I use social media a lot to look at imagery and also take from my own experiences assisting to try to progress with my work.

Images f rom the series   Kings House: In Transition

Images from the series Kings House: In Transition

The Commission

Kings House: In Transition was my first commission out of university. I was sent the brief after Sarah French, one of the selected Fringe emerging curators, messaged me to ask if I was available to do it. I felt the brief really suited my work and so agreed to start the following Tuesday. I was told that I could do whatever I wanted, which was great! However, it all came down to how receptive the staff at Kings House were going to be towards us to what we would be able to photograph. We were fortunate enough to have full access to the building with the help of Cat Fletcher, re-use manager, and Martin Hedgecock, facility and building services manager. The curators assisted me in contacting members in the building, arranging meeting times and having brief interviews whilst I photographed the staff which I really enjoyed as I am used to working on my own in these types of situations but this meant I could concentrate on taking great photos. I decided to shoot film because I knew I would be happy with the end result and this could potentially be another project to add to my portfolio once we had finished.

The organisers of the Fringe had given the trainee curators, Sarah French, Jamila Prowse and Ruby Rees Sheridan, the original space in Kings House reception. Time was of the essence so we had to shoot and complete the edit in a very short period of time. We only had a few days to complete the edit and through assisting I was able to receive advice from a couple of photographers who I have worked with which was really helpful. We agreed on what materials would work within the budget and would be to a high photographic standard. Our space also changed from in the reception area to in the first floor hallway which meant we had more space for the installation.

Images from the series   Kings House: In Transition

Images from the series Kings House: In Transition

Work and Outcomes

We decided to re-use chains that were from an adult day care centre in Brighton that had been funded by the council however the centre had to close because of cuts which Cat Fletcher found for us. We also decided to re-use bulldog clips from the building so this was all in keeping with the concept of re-using and recycling. We had to prepare the space a small amount by cleaning the windows and painting the walls to white as they were scuffed and decorated in a lovely lilac colour.

During the exhibition we put on a talk; Caitlin Chescoe and Cat Fletcher in conversation with Sarah French, Ruby Rees Sheridan and Jamila Prowse, which was us discussing our roles within the project and our journey towards the final exhibition. It was great to have a chance to debrief altogether about the project as we had not had the chance to previously. In hindsight I am glad our tutors made us talk in public at University because I new I would have been really nervous otherwise, however I really enjoyed it.

Images f  rom the series   Kings House: In Transition

Images from the series Kings House: In Transition

Experience and Future Plans

We are hoping for the exhibition to be moved to the Town Hall which is where the workers from the council have moved to. However, we are also looking to potentially show the work at other galleries in the near future.

Overall my experience has been a positive one. I can trust myself to handle the pressure of shooting with the expectation of a good outcome and working within tough time constrains which I found made all of us more proactive as we used our time wisely. It has been different to work with other people on my projects as normally I work alone but it has been really good working as a team making creative decisions. I have really enjoyed meeting everyone involved in the Fringe, have had great exposure and made great contacts. Thank you to everyone.

Find out more about Caitlin and her work via her website.

Photograd Experience: Caitlin Chescoe

As promised, we caught up with Caitlin Chescoe after the launch of her exhibition Kings House: In Transition at Brighton Photo Fringe! Read on to find out what Caitlin has learned from the exhibition, how she got the commission (hint - it involves Photograd!), and what advice she has to give on exhibiting post university...

 
Image from the series  Kings House: In Transition

Image from the series Kings House: In Transition

 

Introduction

My name is Caitlin Chescoe and I am a social documentary and portrait photographer and freelance photo assistant who lives and works in London. I graduated from The Arts University Bournemouth with a BA (Hons) in Photography last year in 2015.

The Exhibition

The Brighton Photo Fringe festival is a registered charity that gives the opportunity to over 100 different lens based, up and coming artists to exhibit their work from the 1st - 30th October. My series is currently on show at Kings House Thurs–Fri 12:00–18:30 Sat–Sun 11:00–18:30 alongside many other artists.

 
Image from the series   Kings House: In Transition

Image from the series Kings House: In Transition

 
 
Image from the series   Kings House: In Transition

Image from the series Kings House: In Transition

 

Planning

My exhibition Kings House: In Transition is a new piece of work that Brighton Photo Fringe commissioned me to do alongside three trainee curators; Sarah French, Jamila Prowse and Ruby Rees Sheridan who contacted me after viewing some of my work on the Photograd website. They sent me their concept, which suited me down to the ground, so I accepted. Fortunately the organisers and the curators of The Fringe had already organised a space for the project to be exhibited in and we were given free reign to do whatever we wished with it.

We were very lucky and managed to get access to Kings House straight away as the people who worked there were very enthusiastic about the project. Myself and the curators went around the building into different departments to speak to individuals about their experiences of working there and then I would photograph the individual. For me it was a chance to put into practice different tips and tricks I have been learning from assisting regarding subjects and clients. 

We only had a few days to confirm the edit so that I could start the post production process. The series went back and forth between myself and the curators a few times but we managed to make a final decision quite quickly that ended up being within budget.

 
Image from the series   Kings House: In Transition

Image from the series Kings House: In Transition

 

Some of the lessons that I have learnt from putting on a show at university are to expect things to go wrong and therefore give yourself enough time to rectify this if it happens. We were really lucky and things from the start ran pretty smoothly, amazingly! The only thing that went slightly wrong was the selected printers we were originally printing with told us their turn around time would be a week and when the time came, it was in fact two weeks, which would mean we would not meet the opening date of the festival. We ended up printing at The Printspace whose turn around time is two days and this meant we were able to test print. We also made sure there were extra options print wise for install because when you are actually in a space, everything can change.

The Fringe is in its seventh year now so we were really lucky as most of the promotion for the show had been done for us as it is very well known. The exhibition is online on the Fringe’s website and is also in a printed format. The footfall on the opening evening was great which is why taking part in group exhibitions is so exciting!

 
Image from the series   Kings House: In Transition

Image from the series Kings House: In Transition

 

Advice

My advice to other graduates is as soon as you have left university to start showing some of your work online so that you gain exposure. I know people who have been assisting for years but still have not got round to making their websites and that is what is going to make you stand out among the others, there is so much competition. I am so glad I designed my website before I left as I had so many other things to be getting on with, mainly financially, after leaving university that it just gets put on hold.

 
Image from the series   Kings House: In Transition

Image from the series Kings House: In Transition

 

Final thoughts

It has been great to be given the opportunity to make work again and I really hope that this leads to more commissions. It has been lovely to hear all of the positive feedback from people around me about my images and work ethic. Thank you so much to the trainee curators who put on the exhibition. They have been so organised throughout, have been there to sort out any problems at the click of a finger and really positive about the project. Also thank you to the event organisers for giving me the opportunity to make some new work and also for supporting me from beginning to end. The festival is an amazing event and I hope to be part of it again in the near future!

Future Photograd: Caitlin Chescoe

 

Images from the series Kings House: In Transition

 

Launch Photograd Caitlin Chescoe will be a part of this years Brighton Photo Fringe! Commissioned for new site-specific work to be made and organised by Brighton Photo Fringe’s three emerging curators Sarah French, Ruby Rees-Sheridan and Jamila Prowse, the launch of the exhibition will take place this Saturday (1st October) at the King's House, Grand Avenue, Hove. 

Caitlin has provided us with a short introduction of the project to give you something to get excited about!

"As the offices of Brighton and Hove City Council since 1996, activity inside Kings House has shaped the face of the city. The imminent sale of the building and relocation of the Council offices has received much local press coverage, but less attention has been paid to the social histories of the site. Kings House: In Transition celebrates the people and stories that have shaped the life of the building by inviting members of staff to share their experiences. The exhibition features portraits and oral histories collected as the Council staff begin the process of relocating."

Caitlin was selected for this commission due to the "strength of her graduate work as a social documentary photographer", as stated on the BPF's press release. 

BPF’s trainee curatorial programme provides opportunities for early career practitioners, offering invaluable hands-on experience in the development and realisation of a photography exhibition. The show responds more widely to BPF16’s theme of Experiments in the Common.

As well as the exhibition, Caitlin will also be involved in an event at Kings House: Caitlin Chescoe and Cat Fletcher in Conversation with BPF16 Emerging Curators on the 8th October at 3 o'clock. The talk will explore King's House as a transitional space, discussing the many journeys that have occurred throughout the building. 

Brighton Photo Fringe is a month long photography festival taking place throughout Brighton, which provides opportunities for emerging photographers, moving image artists and curators. The festival utilises venues across the city, presenting innovative approaches to art display. 

We'll be catching up with Caitlin again soon to find out how she gets on with each event, which we're very much looking forward to!

Future Photograd: Chris Mear

 

Series statement
Legacy: A Reciprocal Tribute is an artwork conceived by Patricia Swannell in response to The Woodland Trusts flagship Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubillee Wood in Normanton-le-Heath, Leicestershire. The woodland, officially unveiled in 2012 to mark the Queens Diamond Jubilee, has filled 460 acres of former mining and agricultural land with 300,000 native trees. Patricia’s artwork takes the form of a plinth, inviting local families to make an annual family photograph against the backdrop of the developing trees. Charting both the changes in their family and the changes in the landscape they collectively call home.

You can find out more about The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Wood here.

Length and influences
The series will take 60 years to complete - a tribute to the Queens Diamond Jubilee. Just one photograph each year, no post-production, no edit. Just pose, compose, shoot, print and exhibit.

For me, there are no theoretical influences for this work. Just the landscape and the family. We meet just before sunset. Take a slow walk down to the plinth. Pose and compose ourselves. And I just make the one exposure. Jobs a good ‘un, as they say. It’s a dream, really.

Involvement
I became involved in Legacy in 2014 as my contacts were passed on through another local commission. Patricia had been collecting flowers and plants from the site during the development of the woodland, to create 60 etchings which would go on permanent exhibition at a local museum. The Woodland Trust then selected a local family who had shown keen interest and support in the wood. The idea was to commission a local photographer each year to photograph the selected family from the plinth, and each photograph would replace an etching each year. 

Emotions
I feel enormously privileged to have been in the right place at the right time to have been asked to carry this beautiful project through to it’s completion. And every July when this shoot comes around I get excited beyond belief. It really is a very quietly beautiful evening to be part of. So, like I mentioned earlier, I’m just trying not to put too much time into pondering how it will look or how things will have changed by the time it’s complete, because when it’s done, I’ll be done too! I might not even be able to complete it! So I’m just savouring every moment of, and in-between, each photograph. I’m following my Grandma’s advice. I’m not wishing it away. 

Future aims
My future aims for this particular project is to just watch how it develops really. I’ll be 83 when I make the last exposure, all being well, so it’s a lifelong project and I don’t want to think about the end too much. As my Grandma always tells me “don’t wish your life away!” The outcome of the work has already been established with the developing exhibition, although it is currently looking for new home due to the demolition of it’s previous residence. It might be nice to see the completed work in a book, but at 83 years old will I have the energy or desire to commit to that? Who knows? Alongside each commissioned portrait I’m also making an annual self-portrait, or is it a selfie now? It’ll be interesting for me to sit and look through those one day anyway.