Where You Are Not

Copeland Gallery, Peckham
24th-28th September 2019
Official Opening Party 26th September

Alexander Mourant installation view at Truman Brewery

Alexander Mourant installation view at Truman Brewery

"The colour of there seen from here, the colour of where you are not” - Rebecca Solnit.

A group exhibition of work by 8 contemporary artists explored through their use of the colour blue. These artists have had tremendous success in their careers to date; exhibiting across the world at prestigious events such as Frieze & Unseen, and feature in many international collections.

Due to Copeland Gallery’s generous sponsorship, this exhibition has been organised by Maddie Rose Hills without artist fees or commission in a genuine attempt champion the work without financial motive.

Production costs are being funded through Kickstarter with art and tickets to events for sale from £5-£400.

 
Alexander Mourant

Alexander Mourant

 

Tess Williams has had solo shows in Germany, Spain and the UK, and has been selected for numerous group exhibitions across Europe. Her work is held in collections in the UK, Europe and the USA.

Tom Pope this year took his performance piece One Square Club to Frieze LA. Graduated with an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art in 2011. Upon graduating he won the Deutsche Bank Artist Award.

Florence Sweeney’s work is in international collections. She’s recently exhibited with Guts Gallery, Espositivo Madrid, SWAB Art Fair Barcelona, The Dot Project London & a solo show at Lily Brooke Gallery, London.

Alexander Mourant’s work has been included in FT Weekend Magazine, British Journal of Photography, Photograph, Unseen Magazine and The Greatest Magazine. He has won the Free Range Award and was recently nominated for Foam Paul Huf Award.

Maddie Rose Hills has exhibited in London, Paris & Barcelona with an artist residency in Iceland. Her paintings have been acquired by the British Airways collection. Commissions include The Dorchester’s 45 Park Lane.

Simone Mudde is a 2019 New Contemporaries artist. Exhibitions with The Photographers Gallery & Unseen Amsterdam. Recipient of RCA New Photographers Prize and shortlisted for European Photography Award.

Katrina Russell-Adams graduated with a degree in Behavioural Sciences. With a successful career in social housing under her belt she took a break to bring up 3 children before coming to art. Artist commissions include ITV and London Borough of Culture.

Matilda Little is a graduate of Central St Martins, her work work directs the viewers attention to the idea of the ‘object’ and questions the object’s status, and in turn our hierarchy of values.

Florence Sweeney

Florence Sweeney

Maddie Rose Hills

Maddie Rose Hills

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Exhibition Preview:
Pay £15 on Kickstarter: Visit the show on the opening night, 24th September, alongside a small group of 50 guests from 7-8pm. This is a chance to speak to the artists as well as being the first to preview the work. Ticket includes a glass of champagne. Buy

Artist Talk | On Blue and Photography
£5 on Kickstarter: By utilising the colour blue as a trigger point, artists Tom Pope, Simone Mudde and Alexander Mourant, will explore their approach to medium, practice and a sense of being in the world. We are thrilled that Duncan Wooldridge will be joining us in the gallery to chair the talk. Duncan is an artist, writer and curator. He is Course Director for Fine Art Photography at Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London. He writes regularly for 1000 Words, Artforum, Art Monthly, and Foam. His curatorial projects include 'Anti-Photography' (2011), 'John Hilliard: Not Black and White' (2014), and 'Moving The Image: Photography and its Actions' (2019). He is currently writing 'The Photograph as Experiment', published in 2020. Saturday 28th September 4pm. Buy

View all event descriptions on the website.

Claire Griffiths at the Cindy Sherman Retrospective, National Portrait Gallery London

Northampton University graduate Claire Griffiths visited the Cindy Sherman Retrospective at the National Portrait Gallery in London earlier this Summer and has reported her experience for the Photograd blog. The Cindy Sherman Retrospective closes on 15th September 2019.


Do we all long to dress up and create disguises for ourselves? Dying our hair, wearing labels, makeup - how we are seen is perhaps more evident than ever in a world where technology is racing at an unprecedented rate and 93 million selfies being taken on average per day. I felt it in my late teens, the need to be seen and unseen and when I got to Art School the camera became a perfect disguise.

Cindy Sherman had made me see photography and the art world in a new way as an art student, pre selfie generation so when her retrospective came to The National Portrait Gallery I rushed to buy tickets. Coinciding with a showing of work supported by the RPS 100Heroines initiative which I had somehow been accepted into entitled (Unframing Identities).

I was to be in London for three days and on the first day I arrived at the exhibition as it opened. Unsure whether my tickets were booked (their system was down at the time), but they let me in, and I walked in like I was entering a Rolling Stones concert ready to experience Sherman's work up close and personal. It felt like seeing an old friends work, someone who had inspired me when it felt like the art world was closed quarters and photography a male orientated past time.

When I started my Fine Art Degree circa 1998 I was dead sure I wanted to paint and draw perhaps become a costume or set designer. Somewhere in my psyche I had always felt drawn to fashion but ended up on a Fine Art Degree, the course offered: painting, sculpture print and another option: Photography. These were the days before digital and the dark room seemed like a place of sanctuary. It still seemed like source material to me though and was not entirely convinced photography was an art, I thought it was perhaps a "cop out" for people who couldn't draw or paint.

Then one week in art history, Cindy Sherman appeared. Our female Art History tutor, Wendy, was a jolly feminist and talked to us about the male gaze and my whole being "woke up". Cindy Sherman along with people like Gillian Wearing and Sophie Calle depicted a different way of using photography for me, a way to communicate what it was to be a women, telling their own stories, communicating their own feelings of things associated with the human condition and often what it is to be a women. Sherman in particular had seemed to be able to encapsulate a whole plethora of things I wanted to do: Fashion, set design, costume and story telling.

On entering the show her large scale images roared at me unapologetically and led me to rooms filled with familiar and unseen work. Untitled film stills 1977-1980 mimicking ideas from traditional female tropes in film noir or Hitchcock was thrilling to see as a series, I had only seen this work in books or on TV. I stood mesmerised as I watched her film Doll Clothes made whilst she was a student, a stop motion playing with dressing up and thought "I wish I had thought of that".

Her work is perhaps more relevant than ever as a whole group of young women (and men) grow up with filters and selfies and more impossible beauty standards to adhere to but Sherman has been exploring these themes for decades. Her Dummy Vogue covers smile down at us, a vampish Jerry Hall gazes back and metaphorizes into a goofy Sherman portrait. Her newer self portraits of women staring down at the viewer yield a vulnerability that I am grateful for, women holding onto youth and beauty, images created on a grand scale imitating what we might find in an upstate apartment in New York perhaps of one of Trumps exes or an ex movie star.

It might not be Sherman until we look closer and find her hidden under thick make up and elaborate wigs. A sense of sadness prevails as our own youth and passing of time is presented to us through Sherman's images - whilst round the corner we find her dressed as a clown grotesquely facing the viewer as if to say "Lets laugh at beauty and ourselves together". For me Sherman opened doors for women making photographs continues to inspire further generations. She took the lens away from a masculine view point, made it her own enabling fresh female perspective, using humour, skill and story telling. To Cindy Sherman I am forever grateful. Go see the show.

TEIFI, a solo show by Falmouth University 2019 MA graduate Isabella Campbell

Isabella Campbell presents a long-term body of work revolving around the river Teifi, set in the heart of West Wales.

PRIVATE VIEW: Saturday 3 August 17:00 - 20:00
(and at other times by appointment)

Image from the series  TEIFI  by Isabella Campbell

Image from the series TEIFI by Isabella Campbell

TEIFI is a long-term body of work concerns the phenomena of the river Teifi that Isabella lives beside in rural West Wales. The series aims to reflect the river’s filmic qualities, and her relationship with it from photographing and walking through its surroundings day to day since June 2016. The work conceptually revolves around the idea of the 'sensory plate of perception' through photography. This opens up a philosophical enquiry into the phenomenology of perception, duration and transparency, which collectively form the Teifi phenomena.

Image from the series  TEIFI  by Isabella Campbell

Image from the series TEIFI by Isabella Campbell

The building in which the exhibit will take place is at The Corrugated Barn near Moylgrove. It is located within 40 acres of wild meadows, woodland and garden, which you will be welcome to walk around. The view overlooks the Carningli mountain near Newport (Pembs).

Image from the series  TEIFI  by Isabella Campbell

Image from the series TEIFI by Isabella Campbell

You can find the exact location of The Corrugated Barn here, which is more accurate than what it says on Google maps.

For light refreshments to be organised, please RSVP your interest via getting a free general admission ticket.

Sophie Harris - Taylor: Epidermis. The Printspace Gallery, London.

Francesca Maffeo Gallery are delighted to present ‘Epidermis’, a solo exhibition by photographer Sophie Harris - Taylor, celebrating the beauty of imperfection. 

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

EXHIBITION DATES 6th - 13th September 2019

PRIVATE VIEW Thursday 5th September 2019 7.30-10.00pm
RSVP info@francescamaffeogallery.com
+44 (0)1702 345005
m – 07970 846 497
info@francescamaffeogallery.com
francescamaffeogallery.com

VENUE DETAILS
THE PRINTSPACE GALLERY 74 Kingsland Road London E2 8DL
Opening times 9am to 7pm Monday to Friday


© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

Harris - Taylor shot and interviewed over 20 bare-faced women across the UK with common skin conditions. The resulting ‘beauty’ shoot aims to break down the stigma surrounding skin issues and celebrate diversity.

“I wanted to create a series of work that empowers and allows women to love the skin they’re in, regardless of what condition they have. Suffering from severe acne throughout my teens and 20’s left me incredibly self-conscious and I longed for ‘normal’ skin. Normality is defined by the images we see all around us. We are led to believe all women have perfect flawless skin - they don’t. Whether not shown or simply disguised, many women suffer from conditions such as acne, rosacea and eczema, most of these women feel a pressure to hide behind a mask of makeup, covering up what actually makes them unique. Here these beautiful women proudly bare their skin” (Sophie Harris - Taylor).

Shot in the style of a traditional beauty editorial, exploring the juxtaposition of style and subject - something seen in opposition to classical beauty. The series’ intention is as a beauty shoot first, the exploration of the skin is secondary. When it comes to body types we have seen the industry swing one way or another, idealising extremes. Harris - Taylor is concerned by this as there is a risk of fetishisation, with this series, she is motivated to record and celebrate the ‘normal’.

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

© Sophie Harris - Taylor, courtesy Francesca Maffeo Gallery

About Sophie Harris-Taylor

Documenting the personal lives and experiences of her own and others, Sophie’s work is effortlessly truthful, approached with a sensitivity and confidence. She is renowned for her images created with natural and ambient light sources, which lend her work an unusual softness and depth.

Typically portraiture based, with some elements of place and surrounding, she uses people to express her own preoccupations and concerns. Although seemingly diverse in subject matter, and to an extent documentary, there is consistently some element of her own vulnerability. Regardless of content, Sophie’s work is crucially bound together by aesthetics, always seeking to in some way glorify that which is not conventional.

Sophie’s work has been selected for the BJP Portrait of Britain, Creative Review Photography Annual, nominated for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, The Renaissance Photography Prize and The Young Masters.

She is represented by Francesca Maffeo Gallery.

'With the Name of a Flower' by Vera Hadzhiyska - An MA Photography solo exhibition

With the Name of a Flower by Vera Hadzhiyska

MA Photography solo show

3rd - 7th September 2019

Four Corners Galley (121 Roman Rd, Bethnal Green, London E2 0QN)

Preview night: Tue 3rd Sept, 6 - 9 pm
Open: 4th - 7th Sept, 11 am - 6 pm

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Krasimira Butseva, a solo exhibition at EEP Berlin

EEP Berlin presents Balkan Mine
solo exhibition & events

Private view: 11th of July, Thursday 7PM

Open daily: 12th - 14th July 2019

Address: EEP Berlin's Gallery Space. Liegnitzer Str. 34 | 10999 Berlin

Balkan Mine is an extensive research of the shifting layers of history, memory and trauma related to the forced labour camps of the Bulgarian communist regime (1946-89) by photographer and researcher Krasimira Butseva (1994, BG).

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In a multimedia installation including film, photography, sculpture and layers of sound, she is recreating her personal journey through the spaces where a dictatorship was once enforced at its hardest. This ongoing project starting in 2016 is Butseva’s collection of accounts of victims and a record of her own subconscious and fragmented experience of history as an outsider. By letting the spectator become part of the intimate narratives of both the survivors and the artist, she is able to construct an image of unseen historical events and formulate a bridge between past and present, thus referencing the unspoken trauma carried within a society and its future generations.

Curated by Krasimira Butseva & Maya Hristova.

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Public Programme

13th July | Saturday 5pm
Remembering whilst Forgetting / In conversation Krasimira Butseva & Maya Hristova

Curator Maya Hristova talks to Bulgarian-born-London-based artist Krasimira Butseva about her exhibition 'Balkan Mine', which includes a series of films and photographs investigating the collective silence and denial of the human rights violations of the communist regime in Bulgaria. 

14th July | Sunday, 4pm
Trauma as Ritual / Reading & Writing Group

Krasimira Butseva will do a series of readings of texts which have influenced her work on 'Balkan mine'. From excerpts of fictional stories to history books, artists’ texts and archival documents, this session will blur the lines between real and imagined allowing for the artist’s narrative to come across. The reading will also be followed by a writing exercise in relation to the themes discussed.

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About

Krasimira Butseva has an MA & BA degrees in Photography from the University of Portsmouth, she has exhibited her work at Seen Fifteen Gallery, London (2019), Phoenix Gallery, Brighton Photo Fringe (2018), In motion / Prototype, Sofia, Bulgaria (2017), Four Corners Gallery, London (2017), Pingyao International Photography Festival, China (2016) and Uncertain States / Mile End Art Pavilion, London (2016). She's also a co-creator of Revolv, a photographers' collective working with British universities and art institutions, with the goal of discovering new experimental forms of creating and teaching photography in the form of lectures, workshops and exhibitions.

krasimirabutseva.co.uk | IG: krasimirabutseva
revolv.org.uk | IG: revolvcollective

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EEP Berlin is an independent platform for contemporary photography from Eastern Europe. Its focus lies in exhibiting the work of Eastern European artists, emerging and established, and presenting it to Berlin audiences.

eepberlin.org | IG: eepberlin

Loupe & The Brick Lane Gallery - Another Graduate Show

 
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Ioanna Sakellaraki
A selection from the series Turtles

In an effort to let go of the human obsession for order and rhythm, I led myself adrift in the big wide world. Being away, lost in the strangeness of the unfamiliar, I constantly looked for home but never returned to it. It is said that tortoises crawl about on red earth, going nowhere in plenty of time. They carry their own home with them forever. The power of recalling and rebuilding memory from the nonexistent. Where there is no place to go and nothing to become; the being-ness of human freedom.

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http://ioannasakellaraki.com/
@ioannasakellaraki_photography


Laura van Erp
Single Image (Diptych)

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LauravanErp Image 1.jpg

@pauravanerp


Alex Currie
Single Image

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Anna Perger
Single Image

I do not follow predefined concepts, even though it may be appealing. When I take a photograph, I have to place trust in my own creativity and ideas. In that moment I am a hopeful wanderer locating the already existing image. By exposing myself, the model and I share our vulnerability, which establishes trust and reciprocity. This is the core of my work. The animal inside everyone appeals most to me. I wander together with the person in front of me, unravelling the wilderness in the both of us.

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Fiona Filipidis
Series – Velvet

I didn’t know how deep I had gone until I came up for air. I fell head over heels and rolled and tumbled and scraped my knees and bruised my elbows, rolled, rolled and rolled around some more until I was stopped by water and couldn’t roll any more. He branded my soul, weakened my walls and seized it all. It ended; an awakening. Velvet is a cathartic journey I embarked on as a way of coming to terms with the end of my first, overwhelming, tumultuous relationship.

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Liam Webb
Series – Mother, Mother…

Mother, Mother… is the retracing and reconstruction of Dyfed-Powys Police 1983 operation 'Seal Bay'. 'Seal Bay' is the true story of the most complex drug smuggling conspiracy seen in Britain. Building a cavern out of fibreglass under an inaccessible cove in North Pembrokeshire the smugglers hoped to move cannabis into the UK. Head of the ring was Danish film star Soeren Berg-Arnback. Mother, Mother incorporates and references cinematic lighting and forensic photography. Mother, Mother... presents itself as a crime story through a complex mix of photographs, and objects forcing the viewer to navigate moments ranging from the vapid to the substantial, and to decipher clues as if at a real crime scene.

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www.liamwebb.co.uk
@liam.p.webb


Megan Winstone
Single Image

Portrait of Gina Tonic, Welsh body activist and writer, eating chips in our local fish bar in Abercynon, Rhondda Cynon Taf, South Wales. South Wales is historically absent from a female voice with its strong male presence of mining communities, all male voice choirs and rugby tribes. Gina and I are from similar areas of the South Wales Valleys and wanted to give a realistic look about its communities and characters. Working with a team of Welsh and Wales based creatives, Lily of the Valley shows the true values of life in the Valleys.

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Josh Adam Jones
Series – XO

Josh set out to unearth and communicate stories about the expatriate communities of Muscat in Oman. XO concentrates on the relationship between local people and outsiders. With over forty-five percent of the population falling into the expatriate category, Muscat plays host to a rich, diverse and colourful culture. The hospitality and generosity shown by the people of Oman was overwhelming. This project was partly a response to Western misconceptions of the East, and misrepresentations of Oriental values and beliefs. Oman is a peaceful and prosperous country; a sanctuary from the conflicts that affect that part of the world.

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www.joshadamjones.co.uk
@joshadamjonesphoto


Jamie Murray 
Series – Folly

‘How do you get the butterfly, starts from there, that’s the transformation. Bottom line is how a man can change.’ Mikey, 2018 This work came about through a series of conversations with individuals who have been incarcerated. Within these conversations the ex-prisoners spoke of what led them to punishment, how they navigated the prison environment, and their eventual transition from institution to freedom. I wanted to hear the stories told by those who had experienced prison firsthand, an approach more akin to a folklorist. The works are a rumination on these private conversations.

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Joe Pettet-Smith
Series – Anarchy Tamed

Gravel roads paved by hand carve through the desert, sheets of rusted metal welded together days before the event make up the City Gates, crowds drift through the dust dressed in haphazard combinations of leather, weathered sportswear and pseudo-military uniforms. This is Wasteland Weekend, the world’s biggest post-apocalyptic festival. The now permanent festival site sits in between the defunct Nevada Nuclear Test Site – where from 1951 a total of 928 nuclear warheads were tested during the cold war – and Hollywood. This is a place where costumes are mandatory, of warring tribes, Thunderdome battles and Mad Max vehicle parades. What started out as a few dozen fans of the films getting together in the desert is now 4,000 enthusiasts from around the world drawn to the promise of chaos and freedom.

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Rebecca Booth
A selection from the Series – In Case of Emergency

In Case of Emergency invites you to question the treatment of women within Westernized society. Depicting sexual assault, the intention of the project is to bring to light the detrimental effects of objectifying women. Social psychology concluded that sexualization (objectification) affects the way we perceive other people, in that it strips them of certain human attributes, such as a moral sense or the capacity to responsibly plan ones actions (Cogoni, Carnaghi, Silani, 2018). Therefore, it is not surprising to learn an estimated 3.4 Million women in the UK have experienced sexual assault over the age of 16 (Office for National Statistics, 2017). The items shown are targeted at women as a ‘super-cute’ way to defend themselves against assailants. A sickly sweet saviour. The hyper feminization of the products exposes the deep rooted ideology of womanhood in Westernized society.

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www.rebeccaboothphoto.com
@rebeccaboothphoto

An interview with female photography group, Uprooted

UPROOTED features six female artists from different cultural backgrounds working with a distinctly diverse approach: photography, installation pieces and works on paper. The unexpected fusion of each artist’s practice leads to a metaphorical understanding of the concept uprooted. The exhibition celebrated the not-yet possibilities when something or someone is rooted out from its familiar locations.

Private view: 29th May 2019, 6-9pm

Dates: 30 May - 2 June, 12-6pm

Location: Arts Hub Gallery. 509 Creekside, Deptford, London SE8 4SA


Tell us about Uprooted.an.exhibition. Who does the group show consist of and have you all studied photography? We are an evolving group of six female artists from different cultural backgrounds, where photography is at the core of what we do. The Uprooted exhibition will consist of a diverse approach including, photography, installation pieces and works on paper. We all studied MA Photography at University of the Arts London in 17/18. 

Image by  Clare Hoddinott

Who or what motivates members to continue making new work?  Our practice is research driven, so this sparks ideas and experimentation. We support one another to activate momentum to try things out and create a safe space to celebrate our achievements and our failures. 

How did Uprooted.an.exhibition come to the surface? What were the initial ideas and inspirations? We wanted to create a group of women to support one another in the next phase of our artistic journeys post studying a Masters. We wanted our work to be seen beyond the UAL network, to create and curate something that we had full control over and to try things we weren't able to do within an educational institution. We were inspired by the common threads running through our works and wanted to build a show around the unexpected fusion of each other’s practice which leads to the metaphorical understanding of the concept uprooted

What is the group’s biggest achievement to date? This is our first exhibition together. Watch this space… 

Individually, we are busy exhibiting elsewhere including, Photo London, Arles in France, Thomassen Gallery in Sweden and The Biscuit Factory in Newcastle. 

Image by  Nazanin Raissi

What's the main goal for Uprooted.an.exhibition? The exhibition celebrates the not-yet possibilities when something or someone is rooted out from it’s familiar location. We hope that each person that comes to the show will find something that resonates with them when thinking about the concept behind uprooted

Image by  Laura Blight

Image by Laura Blight

How can photographers get involved in what you do?  Anyone is welcome to come along to the private view on 29th May between 6.00-9.00pm and the exhibition will remain open till the 2nd June, so do come along and say hi. The majority of the artists should be around most days too. Otherwise you can e-mail us info.uprooted@gmail.com or follow us on Instagram @uprooted.an.exhibition to get in touch. 

Image by SandraF

Image by SandraF

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Perseverance. Things can take time. Our show has been 6 months in the making due to a few hiccups and hurdles, particularly in finding a suitable, affordable and available space in London. 

What does the future have in store for the group? We want to progress and expand our individual practices, collaborate with other artists and engage with the local community in practical ways.

The South West Collective of Photography - A Crowdfunding Campaign

The South West Collective of Photography are hosting their very first photography exhibition along Torquay high street in May. They will be taking over an empty unit and turning it into a public gallery. The theme is “Visual Storytelling”.

It’s with regret that due to various setbacks, the collective have had to start a crowd funder in relation to the accessibility and running of this event. This is to make sure it can be open to the public and operate effectively.

The South West Collective of Photography must stress that arts and culture, particularly photography, are severely underrepresented in this part of the country. It is absolutely vital that we change this, but cannot do it without your help! 

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Introducing The South West Collective of Photography

In this blog post we introduce you to The South West Collective of Photography, a company dedicated to promoting photography and art as a medium in the South West of England. Run by Plymouth University’s recent BA Photography Graduate Samuel Fradley.


Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Samuel Fradley and my motto is to make a positive change within this world.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? For the last 6 years my life has pretty much revolved around some sort of education whether that be from A levels all the way to university; it always involved photography. I studied a BA in Photography at the University of Plymouth and graduated with a first-class honours degree last year.

Image from the series  A Handshake with a Martian  by  Samuel Fradley

Image from the series A Handshake with a Martian by Samuel Fradley

What's your favourite style of photography? I am a big fan of documentary photography, particularly works which are approached as a photographic study. The idea that the photograph freezeframes that moment in time and keeps a record of that story fascinates me. 

Who or what motivates you? I have always been motivated to be my own boss. I suppose I have always had this feeling of rebellion or resentment to those who control or have power to control what I do in my days; I have always wanted to follow my own goals and dreams and through photography I can explore that. I suppose that’s natural as an artist, as you create work within your own perspective. In the last few years I have been really motivated to make a positive change in the photography world. Too many young artists go through education thinking there are little opportunities and it is my absolute goal to change this. 

Image from the series  A Handshake with a Martian  by  Samuel Fradley

Image from the series A Handshake with a Martian by Samuel Fradley

Can you tell us what The South West Collective of Photography is? The South West Collective of Photography is a company dedicated to the promotion of photography and art in the South West. Founded by myself in July 2018 the Collective aims to one day have a permanent gallery or space for artists to work, exhibit and explore their artistic interests. The Collective is a business, but heavily interacts within our local community and voices its opinion on a wide variety of topics that relate to our interests. 

Primarily an online platform, we feature the work of emerging photographer’s and graduates over a variety of social platforms as well as on our own website. This will develop into so much more in the future. 

Image from the series  A Handshake with a Martian  by  Samuel Fradley

Image from the series A Handshake with a Martian by Samuel Fradley

Tell us about the team behind The South West Collective of Photography. Currently, The South West Collective is just myself; Samuel Fradley. In business terms it is just me, but in artist terms that will soon change.

The Collective was always meant to be more than just me; therefore, I am pleased to announce that starting from May, the Collective will begin to announce new members to the Collective family, with our first artist being Ella Cousins. Ella is a recent graduate from Southampton Solent University and will be a fantastic part of the team. Her inspiration, motivation and kind heart is something that is desperately needed in this industry and I am certain she will play her part in inspiring female artists all across the country.

More artists will be announced in time, but I am delighted to say that there will be a strong female presence on the collective, representing and inspiring female artists across the country and further afield with Ella taking a lead on this. 

Image from the series  River  by  Ella Cousins

Image from the series River by Ella Cousins

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for the collective? Honestly when I started the Collective I didn’t have a plan. I’m not really one for long term planning, I have kind of got through life doing everything last minute and it has ironically worked. I knew that I wanted to start an organisation in the South West that represented photography. The primary reasons for this was that the South West has little to no infrastructure for photography. The majority of exhibitions, galleries and institutions are in Bristol or London, but for the thousands of fantastic artists here in the West Country, we have quite literally have nothing. The goals are to change that. I don’t actually pay myself at all from the Collective because I want it to grow. Although in the future I want this to be my living, for now I have to nurture it. 

What is The South West Collective of Photography's biggest achievement to date? Appearing out of nowhere and growing it into a photography platform for artists across the United Kingdom. I have been so privileged and honoured to feature a wide variety of photographers, both students and graduates on the Collective who are so immensely talented, it has just been a fantastic experience hearing people’s stories and watching their work develop. Meeting new people has to be a highlight too, I have encountered so many genuinely lovely people it makes this all worth it.

Image from the series  River  by  Ella Cousins

Image from the series River by Ella Cousins

How can photographers get involved in what you do? At this moment in time, all you have to do is reach out to me via email, Instagram or Facebook. I am more than happy to chat to artists and give advice or discuss featuring them on the Collective. As this Collective grows more opportunities will come about, but for the time being that is the only way to get involved. I am ALWAYS open to new ideas, improvements etc. 

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Ignore what everybody else is doing. Make the work you want to make in the style you want to make it. At the end of the day if somebody doesn’t like your work it’s only an opinion. Don’t fret, figure out what’s right for you and don’t fall into trends or patterns just because something is popular.

Tell us about your goals for The South West Collective of Photography for the future. My goals are to keep on going, to make this my own living and to get out of my part time job. Obviously like mentioned before, the long-term goals are to have our own space, but until that day comes, it’s just a case of going day by day and taking every opportunity that I can to grow The South West Collective. We will be seeking to hold exhibitions, run workshops and artist talks too, to get the public to interact with photography and to inspire the next generation.

Image from the series  River  by  Ella Cousins

Image from the series River by Ella Cousins

What does 2019 have in store for The South West Collective of Photography? 2019 is a huge year for us as it will be our first full year since it was founded. In May we will be hosting our inaugural exhibition. The South West Collective of Photography have been offered the fantastic opportunity to turn a disused, empty shop space on Torquay High street at Fleet walk, into a fully operational public photography exhibition for a duration of 6 weeks beginning in early May 2019. This will be a first in Torbay with regards to photography and will hopefully be the start of something fantastic within the local community and aims to engage with a wide variety of demographics. 

The exhibitions theme is “Visual Story Telling” and will be focusing on local artists and artists from further afield, who have created gripping and engaging photographic bodies of work presenting to the public issues and stories that they may not have ever heard of. We want the exhibition to have as much community engagement as possible and will seek to be holding workshops, talks and visits from local schools, as well as working with local businesses and organisations to try and get the public engaged with photography as a medium and our exhibition. We are hoping to run a series of events and talks from historians and lecturers which will educate students and the public on the selected works themes, in order to educate them on the bigger picture that they otherwise might not be aware of. 

Not only this; we will soon be releasing our brand new website which will have a ton of new content so stay tuned for that!

2020 Collective Present: Environ 

Private View ·  Thu 21 March · 6 - 9pm ·  Copeland Gallery ·  SE15 3SN
Exhibition continues · Fri 22 March · 11 - 4 


2020 is a collective of photographers who create work internationally, collaborating on projects from their studio base in South East London.

For the first time, they will exhibit work together at Copeland Gallery, Peckham. Highlighting the work of twenty members, Environ will exhibit personal projects exploring the human condition within domestic, natural and imagined environments.

Tami Aftab  ·  Joe Beeching  ·  Lily Boyle   ·  Byron Chambers  ·  Tom Coleman  ·  Nathan Keir Crofton-Bond  ·  Oliver Dawson  ·  Maite de Orbe  ·  Rachel Gordon  ·  James Greenhalgh  ·  Matilda Hallander  ·  Unai Mateo Lopez  ·  Frederik Marks  ·   Dina Patey   ·  Prim Patnasiri   ·  Phoebe Somerfield  ·  Peter Stewart-Sykes  ·  India Tuersley  ·  Andrea Urbez  ·  Coco Wu 

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Click here to book your space.

Positive Light Projects presents Dartmoor Summer School of Photography

Dartmoor Summer School of Photography is a week long experimental photography residential taking place on Dartmoor National Park in the summer of 2019. The Dartmoor Summer School of Photography offers the opportunity for a group of visual artists to join together to explore their relationship with photography with the guidance of a selection of renowned artists and photographers in the midst of one of Britains most beautiful national parks.

Days comprise of workshops, assignments, time to experiment, explore and make work. Evenings offer a variety of activities including talks, music recitals, games, time to make more work, night walks, bird watching, swimming, eating together, sitting round the fire and socialising.

The week ends with a group exhibition of the work made during the residential.

The ethos of the Dartmoor Summer School of Photography is to think outside the box, open up, expect the unexpected, step outside your comfort zone. Experiment. Play. Enjoy. 

 
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WORKSHOPS

The week will be split between led workshops with a specific focus and time to develop your own work in response and/or pursue other directions. Students will be able to select 3 out of a possible 5 day long artist led workshops to participate in during the week.

Sian Davey    Presence as an Inquiry   My workshops will be focused on our relationship to our practice. Use your work to explore the bigger inquiry of how did we get here and perhaps where do we want to go.

Sian Davey
Presence as an Inquiry

My workshops will be focused on our relationship to our practice. Use your work to explore the bigger inquiry of how did we get here and perhaps where do we want to go.

Susan Derges    Field Work   In this workshop we will be exploring an intimate and tactile approach to photographing the land and it’s connection to ourselves.

Susan Derges
Field Work

In this workshop we will be exploring an intimate and tactile approach to photographing the land and it’s connection to ourselves.

Jem Southam    Light Atmosphere   This workshop will focus on attention to the relationship between light and atmospheric conditions and the making of colour photographs.

Jem Southam
Light Atmosphere

This workshop will focus on attention to the relationship between light and atmospheric conditions and the making of colour photographs.

Brendan Barry    Constructed Observations   In this workshop we will be constructing a camera obscura, converting it into a giant camera, setting up a darkroom inside and working with it to capture what we can observe and/or construct in front of it using traditional analogue black and white processes.

Brendan Barry
Constructed Observations

In this workshop we will be constructing a camera obscura, converting it into a giant camera, setting up a darkroom inside and working with it to capture what we can observe and/or construct in front of it using traditional analogue black and white processes.

 
Jason Evans    Ant Pictures   Evans’ workshop encourages participants to experience Dartmoor from a different perspective. Relationships between still life and landscape are up for discussion.

Jason Evans
Ant Pictures

Evans’ workshop encourages participants to experience Dartmoor from a different perspective. Relationships between still life and landscape are up for discussion.


Location

The Summer School will be held at The Dartmoor Training Centre not far from Two Bridges, on the banks of the West Dart River in the heart of the Dartmoor National Park, Devon. The Centre lies in a tranquil, secluded valley with easy access to the open moor.

What to bring

Specialist materials needed for workshops will be included, however participants may need to bring some of their own equipment depending on which workshops they partake in. A guide of what you will need to bring will be sent out to successful applicants.

Food

All meals are included. A cooked breakfast, lunch and sit down evening meal, with snacks and drinks available throughout the day. The menu will be vegetarian and as much as possible sourced locally, an effort to reduce our environmental impact. You are welcome to bring extra food. We will endeavour to cater for any extra dietary needs.


Application deadline : extended to 14th April 2019

Applicants will be informed of the results of the selection process by the end of April.

Successful applicants must confirm their participation by payment of the fee within 7 working days of notification. 

Contact.
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Photograd Open 2018 - showcasing photobooks and zines

Photograd will be part of Photomonth this year with an exhibition at London Metropolitan University from Friday 16th to Thursday 29th November. We’ve already released the 30 photographers who will be exhibited, which you can find here, but in this post we introduce you to the 15 photographers whose book or zine we will be displaying in the space.

Harry Crown
Judit Sánchez
Daniella Gott
Daniel Harrington
Billie Blossom
Holly Farndell
Krasimira Butseva
Stan Dickinson
Scott Perry and Zoey Barton
Jasper Jones
Arran Davis
Amy Pezzin
Jake Kehar Gill
Callum Beaney
Charlotte Bond

University of Westminster graduate  Jasper Jones  and the series  Scroll

University of Westminster graduate Jasper Jones and the series Scroll

Manchester School of Art graduate  Daniel Harrington  and the series  Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community

Manchester School of Art graduate Daniel Harrington and the series Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community

Falmouth University graduate  Amy Pezzin  and the series  Garden of Extinction

Falmouth University graduate Amy Pezzin and the series Garden of Extinction

University of Westminster graduate  Scott Perry  and the series  Omniscient London

University of Westminster graduate Scott Perry and the series Omniscient London

Falmouth University graduate  Harry Crown  and the series  M A T E O

Falmouth University graduate Harry Crown and the series M A T E O

University of Portsmouth graduate  Krasimira Butseva  and the series  Slices of Red

University of Portsmouth graduate Krasimira Butseva and the series Slices of Red

University of East London graduate  Billie Blossom  and the series  Queer Porn Portraits

University of East London graduate Billie Blossom and the series Queer Porn Portraits