Where You Are Not

Copeland Gallery, Peckham
24th-28th September 2019
Official Opening Party 26th September

Alexander Mourant installation view at Truman Brewery

Alexander Mourant installation view at Truman Brewery

"The colour of there seen from here, the colour of where you are not” - Rebecca Solnit.

A group exhibition of work by 8 contemporary artists explored through their use of the colour blue. These artists have had tremendous success in their careers to date; exhibiting across the world at prestigious events such as Frieze & Unseen, and feature in many international collections.

Due to Copeland Gallery’s generous sponsorship, this exhibition has been organised by Maddie Rose Hills without artist fees or commission in a genuine attempt champion the work without financial motive.

Production costs are being funded through Kickstarter with art and tickets to events for sale from £5-£400.

 
Alexander Mourant

Alexander Mourant

 

Tess Williams has had solo shows in Germany, Spain and the UK, and has been selected for numerous group exhibitions across Europe. Her work is held in collections in the UK, Europe and the USA.

Tom Pope this year took his performance piece One Square Club to Frieze LA. Graduated with an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art in 2011. Upon graduating he won the Deutsche Bank Artist Award.

Florence Sweeney’s work is in international collections. She’s recently exhibited with Guts Gallery, Espositivo Madrid, SWAB Art Fair Barcelona, The Dot Project London & a solo show at Lily Brooke Gallery, London.

Alexander Mourant’s work has been included in FT Weekend Magazine, British Journal of Photography, Photograph, Unseen Magazine and The Greatest Magazine. He has won the Free Range Award and was recently nominated for Foam Paul Huf Award.

Maddie Rose Hills has exhibited in London, Paris & Barcelona with an artist residency in Iceland. Her paintings have been acquired by the British Airways collection. Commissions include The Dorchester’s 45 Park Lane.

Simone Mudde is a 2019 New Contemporaries artist. Exhibitions with The Photographers Gallery & Unseen Amsterdam. Recipient of RCA New Photographers Prize and shortlisted for European Photography Award.

Katrina Russell-Adams graduated with a degree in Behavioural Sciences. With a successful career in social housing under her belt she took a break to bring up 3 children before coming to art. Artist commissions include ITV and London Borough of Culture.

Matilda Little is a graduate of Central St Martins, her work work directs the viewers attention to the idea of the ‘object’ and questions the object’s status, and in turn our hierarchy of values.

Florence Sweeney

Florence Sweeney

Maddie Rose Hills

Maddie Rose Hills

Exhibition Programme_ Where you are not.jpg

Exhibition Preview:
Pay £15 on Kickstarter: Visit the show on the opening night, 24th September, alongside a small group of 50 guests from 7-8pm. This is a chance to speak to the artists as well as being the first to preview the work. Ticket includes a glass of champagne. Buy

Artist Talk | On Blue and Photography
£5 on Kickstarter: By utilising the colour blue as a trigger point, artists Tom Pope, Simone Mudde and Alexander Mourant, will explore their approach to medium, practice and a sense of being in the world. We are thrilled that Duncan Wooldridge will be joining us in the gallery to chair the talk. Duncan is an artist, writer and curator. He is Course Director for Fine Art Photography at Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London. He writes regularly for 1000 Words, Artforum, Art Monthly, and Foam. His curatorial projects include 'Anti-Photography' (2011), 'John Hilliard: Not Black and White' (2014), and 'Moving The Image: Photography and its Actions' (2019). He is currently writing 'The Photograph as Experiment', published in 2020. Saturday 28th September 4pm. Buy

View all event descriptions on the website.

Photograd Experience: James Dobson

University of Brighton photography graduate and soon to be featured Photograd, James Dobson, has written a piece for the Photograd blog about the group exhibition he was recently a part of at the Brighton Photo Fringe entitled, Lie of the Land. Continue reading to find out more about this group of graduates that have remained connected post university. 

Lie of the Land  installation shot

Lie of the Land installation shot

Introduction

We are four photographers James Dobson, Rachel Maloney, Annalaura Palma and Noora Pelkonen, who met four years ago on the MA Photography course at the University of Brighton, graduating in 2014 and 2015.

Since beginning our studies together we have had an ongoing dialogue, all being interested in different aspects of landscape and place. After we graduated we stayed in touch and continued our conversation beyond University and eventually decided to make a collaborative exhibition when BPF was on the horizon. The exhibition is called Lie of the Land and it is about the ways in which the past, the unperceived and the forgotten fold themselves into our current experience and reading of landscape.

Image from the series  Karelia  by Noora Pelkonen

Image from the series Karelia by Noora Pelkonen

Image from the series  The Forest  by Rachel Maloney

Image from the series The Forest by Rachel Maloney

Planning

We were all at a stage where we felt ready to show our work, be that a different manifestation of older, ongoing work or completely new work and BPF seemed a good opportunity to do this. As a platform it gives you a framework within which your exhibition can be made visible - there are more people engaging with photography and potential visitors in Brighton during the Biennial/Fringe month and you are given support by the fringe in terms of promotion.

We knew that we wanted to show our work in a neutral space (which are quite hard to find in Brighton) such as a gallery, as we wanted full attention from the visitors, so we looked for a suitable space in Brighton and booked it early in 2016. As the gallery is limited in space, the challenge was to make sure that each work had its own breathing space but also make sure that the visitor could enjoy the journey, however small, through the exhibition– so the connections between works was very important. We were limited in the amount of pictures we could hang so we started to think of the exhibition as a collaborative development of an idea, rather than a chance for each of us to have our own individual exhibition. Smaller, low-budget shows often work better with this approach, and I think we all enjoyed discovering new aspects about our work and making new associations between pictures during the curation process. 

Lie of the Land   installation shot: images form the series  Churches  by James Dobson

Lie of the Land installation shot: images form the series Churches by James Dobson

Image form the series   Churches     by James Dobson

Image form the series Churches by James Dobson

In terms of promotion, BPF produce a newsprint brochure with a map and website to navigate the exhibitions, so we decided to not make any flyers but instead built an internet presence via twitter, which you can find here @Lie_of_the_land.

Experience and reflection

The exhibition has had a positive response from visitors. For us it was very good to have a space to see how our new work operated in a gallery context and also to be able to open up dialogues and new relationships. When you’re in this kind of festival environment it is good to be involved in every aspect of making an exhibition – so invigilating, which can sometimes be tedious, was actually at times very rewarding, giving us the opportunity to be surrounded by our work and think about photography. Exhibitions can be great spaces for the development of ideas, in a different way to being out in the world.

Image from the series  Virginia Woolf: Virginia’s path  by Annalaura Palma

Image from the series Virginia Woolf: Virginia’s path by Annalaura Palma

Advice

In regards to advice, look at festivals like BPF that not only support the promotion of your work to a wider audience but give opportunities for photographers to submit their work for exhibitions and prizes; BPF has the Danny Wilson Memorial Prize, the Open Solo Show, the group show at the Regency Town House and also the Collectives Hub.