Loupe 10 Open Call

Loupe, a free magazine featuring a diverse selection of contemporary photography.

Image by  Luke Archer

Image by Luke Archer

ABOUT

Issue 10 will be our first themed edition, and we’re kicking off with the weighty topic of national identity. In the glare of recent events, we want discussion around the topic, from all sides.

We’re looking for projects that explore citizens’ relationship to their country, both positive and negative. You might have photographed, white supremacists in America, a border dispute, Brexit in the UK, or your own feelings towards your home country.

Despite the hefty title we are looking for work on a macro and micro scale; you might have spent years documenting a whole country or only days with an individual. The work can be heartbreaking or humorous – so long as it’s an engaging and well executed body of work.

HOW TO SUBMIT

PHOTOGRAPHY 

We are looking for work from all genres of photography, be it fine art, documentary, fashion or commercial. There are no limits; as long as the work connects with our theme of national identity we want to see it. Send either a link to the project on your website or up to 10 web rez jpegs and a short project statement to submissions@loupemag.com.

Please note we cannot accept any form of file sharing link, so make sure your images are small enough to attach to a single email.

BOOK DUMMY SUBMISSION 

If you would like to submit, please send a PDF of your book dummy to submissions@loupemag.com. Please note if you are selected to be featured you will need to send a physical dummy to us. Copies will be returned, although if you live outside of the EU and the dummy is large / heavy we may ask you to make a contribution to the cost.

WRITERS

If you would like to pitch an article, story or write for Issue 10 please email submissions@loupemag.com.

The deadline for submissions is the 5th of August 2019

Loupe & The Brick Lane Gallery - Another Graduate Show

 
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Ioanna Sakellaraki
A selection from the series Turtles

In an effort to let go of the human obsession for order and rhythm, I led myself adrift in the big wide world. Being away, lost in the strangeness of the unfamiliar, I constantly looked for home but never returned to it. It is said that tortoises crawl about on red earth, going nowhere in plenty of time. They carry their own home with them forever. The power of recalling and rebuilding memory from the nonexistent. Where there is no place to go and nothing to become; the being-ness of human freedom.

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http://ioannasakellaraki.com/
@ioannasakellaraki_photography


Laura van Erp
Single Image (Diptych)

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@pauravanerp


Alex Currie
Single Image

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Anna Perger
Single Image

I do not follow predefined concepts, even though it may be appealing. When I take a photograph, I have to place trust in my own creativity and ideas. In that moment I am a hopeful wanderer locating the already existing image. By exposing myself, the model and I share our vulnerability, which establishes trust and reciprocity. This is the core of my work. The animal inside everyone appeals most to me. I wander together with the person in front of me, unravelling the wilderness in the both of us.

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Fiona Filipidis
Series – Velvet

I didn’t know how deep I had gone until I came up for air. I fell head over heels and rolled and tumbled and scraped my knees and bruised my elbows, rolled, rolled and rolled around some more until I was stopped by water and couldn’t roll any more. He branded my soul, weakened my walls and seized it all. It ended; an awakening. Velvet is a cathartic journey I embarked on as a way of coming to terms with the end of my first, overwhelming, tumultuous relationship.

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Liam Webb
Series – Mother, Mother…

Mother, Mother… is the retracing and reconstruction of Dyfed-Powys Police 1983 operation 'Seal Bay'. 'Seal Bay' is the true story of the most complex drug smuggling conspiracy seen in Britain. Building a cavern out of fibreglass under an inaccessible cove in North Pembrokeshire the smugglers hoped to move cannabis into the UK. Head of the ring was Danish film star Soeren Berg-Arnback. Mother, Mother incorporates and references cinematic lighting and forensic photography. Mother, Mother... presents itself as a crime story through a complex mix of photographs, and objects forcing the viewer to navigate moments ranging from the vapid to the substantial, and to decipher clues as if at a real crime scene.

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www.liamwebb.co.uk
@liam.p.webb


Megan Winstone
Single Image

Portrait of Gina Tonic, Welsh body activist and writer, eating chips in our local fish bar in Abercynon, Rhondda Cynon Taf, South Wales. South Wales is historically absent from a female voice with its strong male presence of mining communities, all male voice choirs and rugby tribes. Gina and I are from similar areas of the South Wales Valleys and wanted to give a realistic look about its communities and characters. Working with a team of Welsh and Wales based creatives, Lily of the Valley shows the true values of life in the Valleys.

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Josh Adam Jones
Series – XO

Josh set out to unearth and communicate stories about the expatriate communities of Muscat in Oman. XO concentrates on the relationship between local people and outsiders. With over forty-five percent of the population falling into the expatriate category, Muscat plays host to a rich, diverse and colourful culture. The hospitality and generosity shown by the people of Oman was overwhelming. This project was partly a response to Western misconceptions of the East, and misrepresentations of Oriental values and beliefs. Oman is a peaceful and prosperous country; a sanctuary from the conflicts that affect that part of the world.

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www.joshadamjones.co.uk
@joshadamjonesphoto


Jamie Murray 
Series – Folly

‘How do you get the butterfly, starts from there, that’s the transformation. Bottom line is how a man can change.’ Mikey, 2018 This work came about through a series of conversations with individuals who have been incarcerated. Within these conversations the ex-prisoners spoke of what led them to punishment, how they navigated the prison environment, and their eventual transition from institution to freedom. I wanted to hear the stories told by those who had experienced prison firsthand, an approach more akin to a folklorist. The works are a rumination on these private conversations.

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Joe Pettet-Smith
Series – Anarchy Tamed

Gravel roads paved by hand carve through the desert, sheets of rusted metal welded together days before the event make up the City Gates, crowds drift through the dust dressed in haphazard combinations of leather, weathered sportswear and pseudo-military uniforms. This is Wasteland Weekend, the world’s biggest post-apocalyptic festival. The now permanent festival site sits in between the defunct Nevada Nuclear Test Site – where from 1951 a total of 928 nuclear warheads were tested during the cold war – and Hollywood. This is a place where costumes are mandatory, of warring tribes, Thunderdome battles and Mad Max vehicle parades. What started out as a few dozen fans of the films getting together in the desert is now 4,000 enthusiasts from around the world drawn to the promise of chaos and freedom.

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Rebecca Booth
A selection from the Series – In Case of Emergency

In Case of Emergency invites you to question the treatment of women within Westernized society. Depicting sexual assault, the intention of the project is to bring to light the detrimental effects of objectifying women. Social psychology concluded that sexualization (objectification) affects the way we perceive other people, in that it strips them of certain human attributes, such as a moral sense or the capacity to responsibly plan ones actions (Cogoni, Carnaghi, Silani, 2018). Therefore, it is not surprising to learn an estimated 3.4 Million women in the UK have experienced sexual assault over the age of 16 (Office for National Statistics, 2017). The items shown are targeted at women as a ‘super-cute’ way to defend themselves against assailants. A sickly sweet saviour. The hyper feminization of the products exposes the deep rooted ideology of womanhood in Westernized society.

Rebecca Booth Image 1.jpg

www.rebeccaboothphoto.com
@rebeccaboothphoto

Loupe Magazine issue 9


Juan Brenner's 'Tonatiuh' is our Issue 9 cover feature. The project explores how 300 years of colonial rule shaped Guatemala’s present situation.

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Loupe regular, Rosie Wadey, shows us around Hollie Fernando’s portfolio, summing up her simple and evidently effective creative approach: create sincere work.

Tee Chandler takes an unusual approach to her family archive, revealing the hushed moments of intimacy between her uncle and his male lover; a heartfelt story elegantly summed up by Sarah Goad.

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Mike Murphy takes a cliched technique, points it at a hackneyed subject, and produces something altogether new and brilliant; his obscure panoramic images are a welcome new vision of Los Angeles.

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Regular Features Include:

Portrait Page, Centre Fold, Turning Point, Book Review

Featured Photographers:

Juan Brenner 
Rory Carnegie 
Tee Chandler 
Alex Colley 
Hollie Fernando 
Karen Harvey 
Ian Howorth 
Mike Murphy 
Muir Vidler

Writers:

Luke Archer 
Mischa Frankl-Duval 
Harry Flook 
Sarah Goad 
Gemma Padley 
Rosie Wadey

Spec:

64 pages 
275 X 200 mm portrait 
80 gsm uncoated paper

Click here to buy issue 9.

Loupe and The Brick Lane Gallery: Another Graduate Show call for work

 
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Calling All Emerging Photographers

Enter your work to our free open call.

Have your work seen by our expert panel of industry judges.

Be in with a chance of winning a free exhibition on Brick Lane, coinciding with other major London student shows.

We’ll provide an opening night with industry guests.

Get the chance to sell your work through our exhibition print shop.

 
Image by Chloe Massey

Image by Chloe Massey

 

About

At Loupe and The Brick Lane Gallery, we’re proud to promote emerging artists. This year we’ve joined forces to create ‘Another Graduate Show’ giving students and recent graduates the chance to have their work exhibited in a group exhibition at the Brick Lane Gallery in London, free of charge.

We realise the importance of giving new photographers a platform, and yet we’re also aware of the financial burden and stress of self-funded grad shows. Our answer is to offer up to 10 outstanding photographers the chance to exhibit their work in Loupe’s own Graduate Show, with no costs whatsoever. This includes no fee for submissions, and thanks to our friends at the creativehub, no printing costs either.

To make our open call as inclusive as possible, we also invite anyone studying for qualifications prior to University, those from nonphotographic courses, and those who have studied within the last two years.

To provide exposure for as many photographers as possible, we will be selecting a short list from the submissions. These shortlisted photographers will have the opportunity to sell their work through the Another Graduate Show online print shop, provided by the creativehub.

Just like our in-print magazine, we welcome submissions from photographers working in any genre and format of photography. You will have your work seen by our handpicked panel of industry judges who will select our shortlist and final exhibiting photographers.

 
Image by Jack Minto

Image by Jack Minto

 

Judges

Luke Archer - Editor and Founder of Loupe Magazine

Rosie Wadey - Photographic Agent at East Photographic

Zach Chudley - Marketing Manager at theprintspace

Keiza Levitas - Content Editor at Magnum Photos

Tony Taglianetti - Founder and Owner of The Brick Lane Gallery

Tom Page - Co-founder of Open Doors


Download a submission guide here.

DEADLINE: Midnight Sunday 19th May

Loupe Magazine issue 8


This issue, though having no intended theme, contains a particularly poignant selection of projects spanning varying genres. Much of the work is sincere by nature, and the subjects thoughtful; exploring religion and worship in the technological age, unearthing buried and forgotten transgressions, and contemplating impermanence. It’s heady stuff. As ever, we are proud to provide a free platform that shares such varied and exciting work from promising new photographers.

Mary Perez makes this issues lead feature with Full Gospel, documenting the megachurches of South Korea. Her photograph of Yoido Full Gospel Church is our first non-portrait to feature as cover, and it’s a striking image to break tradition with. Tom Roche interviews Perez about the importance of her background in religion for the project, her stylistic approach, and her plans to further explore the subject.

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Bertie Oakes, who oversees our new online series Photographic Duos, summarises Martin Errichiello & Filippo Menichetti’s shared body of work. In Quarta Persona is a complex historical investigation of the region surrounding the A3 highway in Italy, uncovering a troubled geopolitical past using varied mediums.

We feature 4 images from iBacteria by Anders Gramer. His series of portraits peering through the growth of their own skin flora is a nice idea neatly executed, and well expanded upon by writer Iris Veysey.

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We also share a selection of images from Julien Martinez Leclerc’s broad and yet refined portfolio, thoughtfully discussed by Rosey Wadey.

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I spoke to Holly Hay, photographic director at Wallpaper* magazine about her role, and asked what advice she has for photographers trying to get noticed.

Also featured is the Turning Point in Briony Campbell’s career, Gemma Padley’s review of Do Not Feed The Alligators by David Shama, Adrien Blondel’s Centrefold submission, and Maren Klemp’s sombre image on the Portrait Page.

You can pick up a free copy from one of over 60 stockists across the country. Single copies, back issues and annual subscriptions are also available to purchase from our online store.

We hope you enjoy the issue.

Written by Harry Flook.

Introducing Loupe Magazine

Loupe, a free magazine featuring a diverse selection of contemporary photography. Issue 7 in stockists now - find out more here.

 
 

Who are you, what's your motto? I’m Luke Archer, editor / founder of Loupe magazine and a photographer in a very loose sense of the word!

I think you can’t go wrong with ‘treat others how you would expect to be treated’ as a motto, it certainly informs my approach to life and Loupe. Funnily enough I think the original quote comes from the book of Luke!

Have you studied photography? What are your thoughts? I studied my BA at UWE and I’m currently studying for my MA at AUB. Many of the Loupe team are recent grads. The magazine goes out to a lot of universities and we do try and feature student work so photography education is an area of interest for us!

There are certain constraints that academia puts on courses to make them a ‘degree’ that I don’t always think are essential for photography. Personally, I think the written elements of courses should be reduced and more emphasis should be put on making sure everyone is technically competent and developing career paths for students. However, photography is a tricky subject to teach, courses tend to be broad and with student dedication so varied it is hard to create a program that will be a perfect fit for each student.

For me studying the BA had a massive impact, the difference in the standard of my work from when I started my BA and finished was huge, I just wish I had spent less time on my dissertation and more time making contacts! That’s very much how I have tried to approach the MA.

I also do worry for current BA students that the fees are incredibly high. I think universities should be covering the cost of London degree shows and more competitions should be free or have low entry cost for students, that’s the feedback we get from our student readers.

What's your favourite style of photography? With Loupe we are trying to show the diversity of photography, how the medium can encompass such a breadth of approaches, so I hope my own taste is as varied I think it is!

That being said, I am a sucker for documentary work where a photographer is able to tell a story through portrait, landscape and detail shots. I’m also becoming very interested in how photographers are incorporating text and interviews into their work to tell a fuller story, currently I’ve been really inspired by the work of Lauren Greenfield and Mahtab Hussain.

Can you tell us what Loupe Magazine is? Loupe is a free photography magazine distributed across the UK. We are stocked at a lot of photography specific locations so I think all our readers are as passionate about photography as we are! As previously mentioned we try and feature a diverse selection of inspiring work.

We launched Issue 1 in May 2016 and have been publishing on a triannual basis ever since.

Who makes up the team behind the magazine? Currently we have designer and co-founder Alec Jackson, Leticia Batty who manages our distribution and Harry Flook who is editor of our web content.

We have a whole host of regular writers including Gemma Padley, Mischa Frankl-Duval, Grace Benton, Alex Ingram and Rosie Wadey, alongside some new recruits who are helping with our web content and will hopefully be writing in future issues. 

We also have Noah and Dan who are doing some research as part of work experience modules for their degrees.

Most of the guys are trying to balance the mag with their own photography / studies and paid work so I try not to overload everyone with tasks. Although you would have to ask them if that’s working out or not!

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Loupe Magazine? Like others we aim to promote new talent but I hope we go the extra mile by sending each issue directly to a lot of people in the photography industry for example: picture editors, curators, ad agency art buyers among many others.

I think that some titles put a deliberate distance between themselves and their readers to somehow inflate their own importance and we don’t want that with Loupe. We are trying to be as open and as approachable as possible. We respond to submissions and give advice when asked (if we can!) and I know from my own experience trying to promote work how much that means to people.

What is Loupe Magazine's biggest achievement to date? Reaching Issue 7! Independent publishing isn’t easy so it is often the small achievements that make it worthwhile. It’s been great to be able to be the first to publish someone’s work in print and then for the project to be picked up by other outlets, or just hearing that our readers appreciate what we do in terms of our general ethos and curation.

It was nice to be shortlisted for the 2017 Stack Awards, the ceremony was great because it was fun to be in a room with so many people obsessed with print.

What do you look for in a photographer who would like to get involved with what you do? We want to feature and promote work that hasn’t had a lot of coverage already. Having said that I am aware that as a free magazine our readership is very broad so I do try and consider that a body of work that might be well known in some areas of the community might be new to others.

For me the best work has a strong and concise concept that has been well executed. If there is a strong degree of originality in both those areas, then that’s the work that grabs my attention.

Curating the magazine is tricky because we have limited pages and that means we have to pass on featuring some very strong work. I feel bad rejecting work because it is not about the quality, it's more about maintaining the diversity of each issue. For example, we have so many people submit amazing documentary work, shot with available light on medium format film but we simply can’t publish it all.

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Try not to let rejection get you down! Although it is something that I still struggle with! There are so many rejections or simply not hearing back from magazines, competitions, potential employers, funding opportunities etc. If you can move forward and keep shooting and keep reaching out to people as opposed to dwelling on it that’s great. There are so many factors beyond the quality of your work that impact on those decisions that we should learn to not take it personally and keep on trucking!

What does the future hold for Loupe Magazine? A new website is top of my list! I want to make sure all the new content we are producing is as easy to access and enjoy as possible.

There are lot of ideas floating about and some vey blue sky thinking! Thankfully with more people helping I hope we can do even more to get to know our readers. A launch event or exhibition for each issue is something we couldn’t do before but hopefully we can put one on for the next issue and everyone can have a beer on us!

Loupe Magazine issue 7

We’ve created a Fellowship with Loupe Magazine and will be bringing you news of brand new issues when they're released. Issue 7 has just landed and includes an interview with Matthew Genitempo who was selected as the winner of our recent collaborative call for work.

You can find a list of local stockists here but if you'd like to subscribe, Loupe are currently offering 20% off subscriptions made before 1st July!


Issue 7 of Loupe is out now! If you are quick copies available for free from our amazing stockists.

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Sticking with our theme of no theme, this issue contains our most diverse range of projects yet. It’s a real celebration of the varied styles in contemporary photography.

Matthew Genitempo won the Loupe x Photograd competition with his project Jasper, a poetic documentation of the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, and the men who live there. We loved the work so much we decided to put it on the cover.

Image from the series  Jasper  by  Matthew Genitempo

Image from the series Jasper by Matthew Genitempo

Final year student Ema Johnston is featured with her fresh take on the much explored topic of drag, accompanied by Sarah Goad’s words.

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Our online editor Harry Flook talked to Jack Fleming about his new body of work, Punching, which focusses on amateur boxing in Bristol and Brighton.

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Also featured is Lewis Bush’s Shadows of the State alongside an interview with Museum of London curator Anna Sparham and our other regular features.

If you can’t make it to stockist single copies, back issues and annual subscriptions are also available to purchase from our online store.

We hope you enjoy the issue!

Fiona Filipidis - To make a prairie

For the duration of March we were seeking work from photography graduates alongside Loupe Magazine to reward with a collection of prizes and interviews. A lot of time was spent looking through the submissions and decisions were finally made. Here we present you with our final runner-up!

Fiona Filipidis was born in Paris and later studied for a BA in Photography in France before moving to study for an MA at London College of Communication. We've interviewed Fiona here about the series To make a prairie.


To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,
One clover, and a bee,
And revery.
The revery alone will do,
If bees are few.

Emily Dickinson

Will revery alone really do if bees are few? As much as I love to daydream, I’m afraid the answer is a resounding, gut-wrenching ‘NO’. Bees are crucial to the continuation of human life. But our impact on the environment through the misuse of insecticides, added to the proliferation of pests and diseases and loss of habitat, is threatening the survival of this mighty insect. When bees have access to good nutrition, so do we – you can thank them for one in three bites of food you eat – and yet every batch of pollen has at least six pesticides in it.

From poetry to politics, religion to architecture, the honey bee has managed to waggle-dance itself into every nook and cranny of the human world. Our relationship with the bee is one that spans thousands of years, and I have attempted to synthesise it in one single book.

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

I divided this book into 6 chapters, each one edited in a specific way: a piece of writing is preceded by a full-page image and followed by a selection of images in relation to the text. The full-page images are of the stormy skies that descended over London on 16th October 2017, when hurricane Ophelia made her way to our shores. All I could hear and read at the time was “It’s the end of the world!” and I couldn’t help but find a parallel with what could potentially happen if bees were to become extinct. The texts are a mix of personal life experiences and detailed knowledge about the honey bee and its history in relation to us.

The imagery is a mix of found artefacts and my own photographs. Mingling the past with the present is my way of showing our constant and ever-growing relationship with the honey bee. My hope is that there is something for everyone in this book; if a teenager were to pick it up and see a photo of Beyoncé, I would love for it to peak their curiosity and push them to do a little bit of digging.

This project is more relevant now than ever. Every day, news articles emerge with ever-growing alarming headlines about bees and insects in general. We humans hold the fate of the wee honey bee in our millions of hands. By some unimaginable, intangible natural power, we have been given the gift of life, and it is our duty to make sure all living entities that share our cosmos continue on the path they were meant to take.

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

Can you introduce yourself? What and where did you study? What's your motto? I am a 28 year-old multicultural photographer who grew up in the leafy suburbs of Paris, France. My dad is half-French, half-Greek and my mum is half-English, half-Scottish. I have Portuguese relatives and grew up surrounded by friends from all over the globe, which I feel all greatly contributed to my openness and curiosity for the world. 

I studied for a BA in Photography in Paris before moving to the UK to pursue an MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication, from which I graduated this past January. 

I have never had to think about a motto before, but maybe “laughter is the best medicine”! I love a good chuckle. 

From the photobook  To make a prairie

From the photobook To make a prairie

Give us an overview of your work. What themes do you like to explore? My most recent projects are all related to nature and the environment in one way or another. Prior to To make a prairie, I was working on an image/text concept book called El Dorado which deals with the notion of gold in its broadest of meanings, whether it be physical or purely metaphorical, and What do you want to be when you grow up? which portrays our desire to reconnect with nature through a humorous, albeit slightly strange, depiction of my fantasized mother/daughter relationship with Phoebe, my favourite houseplant.

I always try to add an element of humour or levity to my projects and my writing, as I have come to realise that it helps people react to and interact with my work on a different level. I believe that you don’t always have to show the negative aspects of any given situation in order to bring awareness to it. I find the idea of talking about important issues contrasted with an underlying light-hearted tone to be a very interesting one that I would love to push further.

I recently came across an article written by Tim Davis on photogeliophobia, or the fear of funny photography, in which he states that, “The history of photography’s overall overseriousness starts to feel like a first date that can’t laugh at the ketchup he’s spilled in his lap.” And the combination of spilt ketchup and the noise the bottle makes while doing so is more often than not quite amusing.

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

What encouraged you to submit to the Loupe Magazine and Photograd call for work? Have you got any tips for photographers submitting work for similar opportunities? Getting your work out there is the tricky part upon graduating, as you want to use the momentum you’ve gathered throughout the year to propel you and keep pushing for your work to be seen. Photograd is the ideal platform to start, as you’re only a graduate once (or twice). I have been following the website for years now and have always been amazed by the quality of the photographic projects you choose to publish, and feel humbled to be in such great company. I am also excited whenever I come across new platforms such as Loupe Magazine, as I believe there can never be enough websites and magazines to showcase emerging talent. So the combination of both seemed perfect!

My main piece of advice would be to keep applying to calls and competitions, even if the constant rejections can cause you to lose hope (which I have lost on many occasions, but keeps returning again and again). I find being organised to also be very useful; I have monthly lists organised by closing dates on my desktop so that I know when I need to apply for calls, residencies, competitions, grants, and what to send.

From the photobook  To make a prairie

From the photobook To make a prairie

How did this series come to the surface? Why did you decide to make work around our relationship with bees? It was all very coincidental, really, as most projects usually are! I was chatting with one of my tutors from LCC, Morag Livingstone, about what I could work on next when she, quite bluntly, asked me, “What pisses you off and what brings you joy?”. I realised there and then that a natural theme underlined all of my answers, and she saw my eyes light up when I told her about hives being kept on rooftops in the middle of Paris. I had also, like many other people, received dozens of email petitions to “Save the Bees” but had never given them much thought. And I had been struck by a photograph that was doing the rounds on Facebook at the time, showing what the fruit and veg aisle of a supermarket would look like if bees were to become extinct. So I started my research and within a couple of days that was it, I was hooked, all I could think of were bees, bees, bees. In my book, I quote British beekeeper R. O. B. Manley who defines bee fever as “a form of insanity from which you never really recover”, and to my great delight I think I’ve caught the bug, too. 

From the photobook  To make a prairie

From the photobook To make a prairie

The outcome of To make a prairie is a photobook. Describe your book and particular layout of images. I divided To make a prairie into 6 chapters, each edited in a specific way: a piece of writing is preceded by a full-page image and followed by a selection of images in relation to the text. The full-page images are of the stormy skies that descended over London last October, when hurricane Ophelia made her way over here and people kept saying that it felt like the end of the world; I couldn’t help but find a parallel with what could potentially happen if bees were to become extinct. The texts are a mix of personal life experiences and detailed knowledge about the honey bee and its history in relation to us. And the pictures are a mix of found archival imagery and my own photographs. The image pairings are often comical and bounce off one another as I wanted to constantly excite the reader’s eye and not let it become accustomed to one type of image. My hope is that there is something for everyone in this book; if a teenager were to pick it up and see a photo of Beyoncé, I would love for it to pique their curiosity and push them to do a little bit of digging. As for the cover, the bee drawing was created by my cousin’s 5-year-old daughter, Caitlin. 

Was it important that you executed this work in the form of a photobook? Yes, I knew from the start that the final form of this project would be a book. I am an avid photobook reader, collector and admirer. I spend a good amount of time looking at sequencing, layouts, papers, binding techniques and feel genuine joy when I come across a book which excites both my eyes and my fingers! I had always wanted to make a book from start to finish, from the image making to the editing to the design of it, and saw this project as the perfect opportunity to do so. 

From the series  To make a prairie

From the series To make a prairie

What are your future plans? I am currently trying to publish, or self-publish, To make a prairie, as well as working on a zine about a trip I took to California in February. In about a month’s time I will be doing a 3-week artist residency in northern Italy with Ardesia Projects and Jest, a photography gallery in Turin, which I am very excited about. And I will forever be working on researching bees in order to fully live up to my “bee-lady” image!

Lorenza Demata - It all started when some of us left the country

For the duration of March we were seeking work from photography graduates alongside Loupe Magazine to reward with a collection of prizes and interviews. A lot of time was spent looking through the submissions and decisions were finally made. We're really pleased to present here the first runners-up interview.

Lorenza Demata is a photographer and visual artist originally from Italy who studied for an MA in Photography at London College of Communication. We've interviewed Lorenza here about the series It all started when some of us left the country.


It is estimated that expatriates constitute approximately 40% of London population.
At the same time, almost 50% of the total consumption of food resources relies on the importation of fruit and vegetables from other countries.


This project is an investigation of the notion of identity in the contemporary migratory context.
The displacement of human resources is explored through a visual analogy with imported fruit and vegetables. By creating this parallel relation between people and food commodities, Lorenza aims to unveil the process of redefining individual identity that often takes place in the experience of expatriates.
The photographic series and the book ask the viewer to critically reflect on the role of the human workforce in the political context of global migration.

From the photobook  It all started when some of us left the country - I

From the photobook It all started when some of us left the country - I

Can you introduce yourself? What and where did you study? My name is Lorenza (Lori) and I am a photographer and visual artist based in London. I come from Florence, Italy, where I first graduated in International Cooperation and Conflict Management. After my first BA, I studied Photography for three years at Fondazione Studio Marangoni in Florence, until September 2016. Then I moved to London to attend the MA in Photography at London College of Communication. I recently graduated and I am now working as a freelance photographer in London.

From the series  It all started when some of us left the country

From the series It all started when some of us left the country

Give us an overview of your work. What themes do you like to explore? Because of my multidisciplinary background, the content of my works is somehow always linked to social and political issues and it investigates themes related to the ideas of identity and culture. In my latest works, I have been particularly interested in the processes that influence and change the concept of cultural identity in the contemporary globalised context.

I usually address these concepts through portrait and staged photography, by subverting and experimenting different approaches. As a result, I would say that my practice sits between documentary and conceptual photography.

From the photobook  It all started when some of us left the country - I

From the photobook It all started when some of us left the country - I

What encouraged you to submit to the Loupe Magazine and Photograd call for work? Have you got any tips for photographers submitting work for similar opportunities? I usually try to apply to as many open calls as I can. I think these kind of calls are a good opportunity to show work, as well as to get feedback and responses. It is useful to always challenge ourselves and to confront our work with others. Accepting feedback and criticism is not always easy. But taking into account constructive suggestions can make you understand how complete your work is and it can contribute to make positive improvements.

How did this series come to the surface? Why did you decide to investigate identity in the contemporary migratory context through the use of photography? When I started my MA in London I wanted to investigate a theme that could be somehow close to my personal experience. I started wondering to what extent cultural identity changes when we move from our country of origin to another. I have also been interested in the process of commodification of the foreign human workforce in general and in particular in London.  

From the photobook  It all started when some of us left the country - I

From the photobook It all started when some of us left the country - I

I think it is important to reflect on identity and cultural issues in this place and in this historical moment.

Almost half of the population of London is constituted by people from other countries. While gathering data for my theoretical research process, I also found out that a large amount - approximately 50% - of the food commodities we consume in the UK is imported from somewhere else. By visually connecting expatriates to imported vegetables and fruit, I want people to reflect on how much a country relies on the global importation and migration, as well as on the role of foreign people in this context. 

From the series  It all started when some of us left the country

From the series It all started when some of us left the country

The outcome of It all started when some of us left the country is a photobook. Describe your book and explain why you executed your work in this way. The diptychs are usually installed in exhibitions as a series of booklets, which aim to recall the scale of a passport. 

The other part of the project It all started when some of us left the country - I is in the form of a book. In this section, I am investigating the concept of cultural adaptation by confronting a specific fruit with a personal story. As a result, the book mixes different visual inputs, such as screenshots, graphics, manipulated archival material and photographs.

Why have you cut out the faces in your portraits? The face is one of the main elements which defines the identity of a person. It is, I would say, indexical of the existence of the subject, and this is particularly evident in identity documents. 

From the series  It all started when some of us left the country

From the series It all started when some of us left the country

I chose not to show the face to reflect on the concepts of displaced identity and of absence. The size of the white square also recalls the photos that are used for official documents.

I think my aim is to underline how it is challenging to define ourselves culturally and individually.

Tell us about the accompanying pieces of fruit in your images. How have you linked fruit and portraits together? For the still life photos I gathered data about the most imported fruit and vegetables. Every piece is paired with the portrait according to the colours. I did not want to link the food with the subject on the basis of the same nationality. This way I want to enhance the concept of displacement and of distance of commodities and people. Furthermore, I mean to underline how the movement of goods and human migrations are global, by going beyond national borders.

From the series  It all started when some of us left the country

From the series It all started when some of us left the country

What are your future plans? At the moment, I am going on with this project and with the specific fruits and stories. In the future, I would like to investigate the social and cultural relationship between expatriates and locals. I also want to analyse some form of local cultural ‘resistance’ in the economic context, either in London or somewhere else.

We're calling for work with Loupe Magazine!

 
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Loupe Magazine and Photograd come together to celebrate outstanding photographic talent. We're seeking a series of work from one photography graduate to reward with a feature in Loupe Magazine issue 7 (due for release Summer 2018), 2 tickets to Photo London and years subscription to their Academy, and a feature on the Photograd Spotlight. Three runners-up will be showcased on the Photograd blog.

The theme is open and the submission process is free. Entries close midnight Saturday 31st March 2018.

To enter, email your chosen series of work saved as JPG's alongside a series statement to loupexphotograd@gmail.com using 'Photograd X Loupe' as the subject.

Good luck!

 

Image from the series Audiotypes by University of Cumbria 2015 graduate Liam Collins.