Loupe Magazine issue 9


Juan Brenner's 'Tonatiuh' is our Issue 9 cover feature. The project explores how 300 years of colonial rule shaped Guatemala’s present situation.

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Loupe regular, Rosie Wadey, shows us around Hollie Fernando’s portfolio, summing up her simple and evidently effective creative approach: create sincere work.

Tee Chandler takes an unusual approach to her family archive, revealing the hushed moments of intimacy between her uncle and his male lover; a heartfelt story elegantly summed up by Sarah Goad.

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Mike Murphy takes a cliched technique, points it at a hackneyed subject, and produces something altogether new and brilliant; his obscure panoramic images are a welcome new vision of Los Angeles.

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Regular Features Include:

Portrait Page, Centre Fold, Turning Point, Book Review

Featured Photographers:

Juan Brenner 
Rory Carnegie 
Tee Chandler 
Alex Colley 
Hollie Fernando 
Karen Harvey 
Ian Howorth 
Mike Murphy 
Muir Vidler

Writers:

Luke Archer 
Mischa Frankl-Duval 
Harry Flook 
Sarah Goad 
Gemma Padley 
Rosie Wadey

Spec:

64 pages 
275 X 200 mm portrait 
80 gsm uncoated paper

Click here to buy issue 9.

SEMIMAGAZINE Issue 1 * ALPHA *

Semi Magazine is a non-profit, independently published online and annual print magazine championing new voices within the global art community. Work featured in Semi Magazine often comments, acknowledges and questions current and past sociology. We feature artwork deemed topical or important in some way or work which has openly been worked on with passion and vigour. Semi Magazine was established in late 2017 and is funded entirely by its own revenue and, lovingly, by its founders.

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Semi Magazine Issue 1 * ALPHA *  consists of 160 pages of artistic narrative and exploration on a few important topics within sociology and global society. In this issue we explore intuition, anticipation, commodity, tradition, imperfection, skaters, women and politics influencing sociology.

Featuring the work of Alyssa Fujita Karoui, Arthur Fechoz, China Hopson, Ioanna Sakellaraki, Laura Dow, Sophie Barbasch, Tilyen Mucik, Jeroen De Wandel and Marie Smith.

The A5-ish sized magazine is printed on 100gsm Archival Matte Art Paper and Perfect Bound. The Magazine is costs €17.99 but currently is on sale at €15.00 (without shipping) to celebrate our first ever celebration. Our first print run is small at 50 copies so sales are limited.

Alyssa Fujita Karoui  Minor Revelations  Spread

Alyssa Fujita Karoui Minor Revelations Spread

Sophie Barbasch  Military Logic  Spread

Sophie Barbasch Military Logic Spread

Arthur Fechoz  Horizon

Arthur Fechoz Horizon

Introducing Fable & Folk

There seems to be a running theme in our recent blog posts here at Photograd as we introduce you to some other online communities and networks.
In this blog post we introduce you to Fable & Folk, an independent platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire.

We think Charlotte’s answers are really inspiring so we hope you enjoy a read through them.

If you have something to share or talk about on the blog, get in touch!

Kate Walker,  A Day Away From the Farm , 2018

Kate Walker, A Day Away From the Farm, 2018

Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Charlotte and I’m a recent photography graduate. I wouldn’t say I have a motto, but one of my favourite quotes is “comparison is the thief of joy”. I think this applies so much within the photographic community - I spent years looking at other people’s work and thinking it was so much better than my own. Once I learnt to value my own work and not compare myself to others, I produced my best photography to date.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I was born in Manchester but grew up in a small village in North Lincolnshire. I started studying photography at A Level then moved to Cheltenham to study Editorial & Advertising Photography at The University of Gloucestershire. I graduated in November and recently got a job as a Content Creation Manager at an independent company specialising in homeware and DIY products. I plan on travelling in a couple of years time and would like to start my own photobook business in the future.

Charlotte Colenutt,  Soul Mate , 2018

Charlotte Colenutt, Soul Mate, 2018

What's your favourite style of photography? I wouldn’t say I have a favourite genre of photography, I love and appreciate photographs that tell a story or photographs that have thought and craftsmanship behind them. My specialisation, however, is documentary photography because I love to talk to people. I love to dedicate time to speaking to someone, finding out their story and trying to capture that. Moreover, I love finding out the story behind an interesting place and trying to document every inch of it to best tell it’s story to others.

Who or what motivates you? I have been passionate about photography for years now. I guess what motivates me to photograph is I feel a need to tell people’s stories and share them. I feel motivated by what’s going on in the world and by finding stories I haven’t seen/heard told before. I also surround myself with other photography - photobooks, magazines, social media accounts, organisations and blogs - to inspire me and keep me constantly thinking of new ideas.

Can you tell us what Fable & Folk is? Fable & Folk is an online platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire others. Directed at young or aspiring photographers, it’s a space I curate and share narratives and photo-stories. I want to develop Fable & Folk into more than just a blog sharing others work but an online hub - full of information from fellow budding photographers and the professionals whilst keeping my audience updated with current affairs in the photographic world.

Gweniver Exton,  Spiritual Spaces , 2018

Gweniver Exton, Spiritual Spaces, 2018

Tell us about the team behind Fable & Folk. There isn’t really a team at Fable & Folk, it’s mostly just me. I tend to be involved in every step of the process from recruiting a photographer to feature to the end blog post and sharing that on social media. I don’t feel I would be 100% truthful though if I said I did everything. Sometimes, my partner Adam Elliott and a few great friends from university, particularly Megan Bendall, are a great assistance in helping me find new and exciting work. It’s difficult running the operation mostly on my own but I consider it my baby and even if I had a full team of amazing staff, I’d still want to be involved in everything.

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fable & Folk? Fable & Folk started when I was studying at university and couldn’t decide what I wanted to do for a career - all I knew was that I love photobooks. I love designing them, constructing them and collecting them. Eventually my tutor Grant Scott and I decided the best way for me to pursue a career in photobooks would be for me to start my own publishing company. To build an audience, you first need to create a blog that naturally attracts an audience that will eventually move from the blog, to your company. I can’t thank Grant and my university peers enough for their support of Fable & Folk and if you haven’t already, I recommend listing to Grant’s podcast series ‘A Photographic Life’.

Jordan Turnbull,  A Rock and a Hard Place , 2018

Jordan Turnbull, A Rock and a Hard Place, 2018

What is Fable & Folk's biggest achievement to date? I’ve never been one to keep track of numbers or views. I know it sounds cheesy but I would say my biggest achievement is having had the chance to be in contact with so many fantastic photographers and to have built a hub of Fable & Folk support on Twitter. I feel so proud of where Fable & Folk is, who our biggest supporters are and most importantly, the list of photographers I get to consider friends and mentors.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? We always love being contacted by photographers! If you’re interested in submitting to Fable & Folk, visit our ‘Contact’ page for more details. We don’t have specifics on what the series should necessarily be or look like, we only ask you send us a strong narrative. THAT’S IT. That’s not to say we accept all work but we always want to offer something - whether it’s a feature on the blog or advice on how to develop the work to eventually get it featured. We also love getting constructive criticism and positive feedback from our audience on F&F so please feel free to message us or drop us an email.

Adam Elliott,  For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal , 2018

Adam Elliott, For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal, 2018

Give one tip to new photography graduates. If I could give one tip to new photography graduates I would stress the importance of networking - whether it’s through social media or attending events, it’s vital to make contact with other photographers. Networking so much during my course has meant that since leaving university, and trying to grow Fable & Folk, I have had endless support and mentorship from so many different photographers and influencers within the community - special thanks to Iain Sarjeant for giving me heaps of advice when the blog first started and to Chloe Juno for motivating me and offering so much help. In addition, I think it’s even more helpful if you’re struggling mentally, feeling overwhelmed or lost, to talk to someone in the same boat so don’t be afraid to reach out!

What does 2019 have in store for Fable & Folk? I don’t want to give too much away but I’m hoping 2019 will be a game changer for Fable & Folk. I really want to get more interviews on the blog and I’d like to try and get a new feature on the site where I share exhibitions, events and workshops for people to attend. I’d also potentially like to rebrand - new website, new logo - so the brand evolves with the work and the audience. I hope we can really develop into a fully realised online platform featuring lots of different important yet inspirational content for budding photographers/ photography enthusiasts.

Introducing Flourish

In this blog post we introduce you to Flourish, a magazine all about thriving in a particular place, community, culture and flourishing in the outdoors. Flourish are currently seeking support through their Kickstarter campaign to bring their second issue to life which will be all about the British Isles. Check out their great rewards here - we’ve pre-ordered ourselves a copy!


Volume 1 of Flourish

Volume 1 of Flourish

My name is Lucy Jane Saunders and I am a Bath Spa University Photography graduate. I started photography years before going to university as a hobby, inspired by the disposable film camera images my dad would bring home and develop after his travels abroad. I never anticipated it could become my job, yet it slowly immersed me into the world of photography and its potentials. At university my style narrowed and I found my preferred way of working. Photographers such as Jon Tonks, Colin Pantell and Robert Darch inspired my documentary approach to photographing. Yet being outdoors, travelling, and finding new locations really motivated me to keep making new work. 

After graduating two years ago I started freelancing alongside setting up the magazine publication ‘Flourish’. I have always adored working within print production and love magazine design. I initially created it out of pure passion, the desire to create new work, and design pages where photographs and text interacted on the page telling stories. But once the first volume was made I almost felt selfish keeping it to myself… the stories I had encountered travelling, the archive of photographs I had collected and the other people I collaborated with. I decided to launch a Kickstarter Campaign to see if other creatives would be interested in supporting the publication to get the magazine to print. To my surprise we achieved our target! People from all over the world backed the campaign and three months later we had enough funding to get the magazine to the printers. I sat in the post office for hours posting a host of magazines to backers and from there I tried to gain stockists to hold the rest.

Flourish became a brand rooted from its definition: “(of a living organism) grow or develop in a healthy or vigorous way, especially as the result of a particularly congenial environment.” As humans we are constantly seeking new, intriguing, and stimulating locations to explore, travel, and experience. Flourish aims to capture those moments we treasure; the bright colours, the tastes we remember, and most importantly the time spent thriving within that place. 

I wanted to capture not only the sensual elements of a location, but also its underlying struggles, and those who have met and overcome the challenges of sustainability. Those who live from the land, create from the land, and are protecting and flourishing with the nature that surrounds them.  

In recent years, photographic magazines have been blurring the lines between books and throwaway publications. Flourish is a magazine with stability, acting as a visual map for your mind, a great piece of reading material for your rucksack, and some inspiration to enjoy with your morning coffee. 

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Flourish will remind you that life is an experience, to capture those moments from other lives you cross paths with, to think more about what surrounds us in the landscapes you gaze at, and to speculate more on your next adventure.

Over the past year Flourish has thrived and I started to stock the publication in more and more independent stores. Due to the unexpected work I had to start bringing people on board and the Flourish team started to grow. My amazing supportive family started to help me get a website together, social media sites, help package, proof read and blog. It almost became a full time job for myself. 

My biggest achievement for the publication so far was definitely an unexpected win at the Creative Bath Awards in the summer of 2018. Winning Young Creative was an outstanding achievement for myself and for the magazine team. As we went from strength to strength I found the need to make more work and I was conscious people would be expecting a second volume. Depleted of money with the print of volume 1 and the lack of freelance work I could do, I find myself back in the same position as I was in with volume 1…. It’s never easy setting up a business and the profit from print is minimal, at least for the first couple of volumes. I have set up another Kickstarter to support volume 2 titled A Snippet of The British Isles where we collaborate with more photographers, writers and illustrators than we did previously in volume 1. 

Our Kickstarter Campaign is now in its last 30 days, so we are currently half way through. We are really close to making our target to get the publication to print and we would love the support of fellow photographers, creatives, and others who are passionate about the subject of Travel, Culture, Sustainability and Outdoor Living. Our campaign acts as a pre-ordering service…. where you can pre-order volume 2 A Snippet of The British Isles but also the possibility of gaining other rewards such a one off prints, illustrations and getting your name within the volume. 

If you would be interested in supporting the publication please visit our page here.

I am always on the look out for new photographers to feature within the publication. I love collaborating and love working with other graduates and fresh graduates as I was once in this position myself. I am always on the look out for something unique… someone who can create innovate stories through their pictures and who are enthusiastic about their work! 

Loupe Magazine issue 8


This issue, though having no intended theme, contains a particularly poignant selection of projects spanning varying genres. Much of the work is sincere by nature, and the subjects thoughtful; exploring religion and worship in the technological age, unearthing buried and forgotten transgressions, and contemplating impermanence. It’s heady stuff. As ever, we are proud to provide a free platform that shares such varied and exciting work from promising new photographers.

Mary Perez makes this issues lead feature with Full Gospel, documenting the megachurches of South Korea. Her photograph of Yoido Full Gospel Church is our first non-portrait to feature as cover, and it’s a striking image to break tradition with. Tom Roche interviews Perez about the importance of her background in religion for the project, her stylistic approach, and her plans to further explore the subject.

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Bertie Oakes, who oversees our new online series Photographic Duos, summarises Martin Errichiello & Filippo Menichetti’s shared body of work. In Quarta Persona is a complex historical investigation of the region surrounding the A3 highway in Italy, uncovering a troubled geopolitical past using varied mediums.

We feature 4 images from iBacteria by Anders Gramer. His series of portraits peering through the growth of their own skin flora is a nice idea neatly executed, and well expanded upon by writer Iris Veysey.

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We also share a selection of images from Julien Martinez Leclerc’s broad and yet refined portfolio, thoughtfully discussed by Rosey Wadey.

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I spoke to Holly Hay, photographic director at Wallpaper* magazine about her role, and asked what advice she has for photographers trying to get noticed.

Also featured is the Turning Point in Briony Campbell’s career, Gemma Padley’s review of Do Not Feed The Alligators by David Shama, Adrien Blondel’s Centrefold submission, and Maren Klemp’s sombre image on the Portrait Page.

You can pick up a free copy from one of over 60 stockists across the country. Single copies, back issues and annual subscriptions are also available to purchase from our online store.

We hope you enjoy the issue.

Written by Harry Flook.

Introducing Loupe Magazine

Loupe, a free magazine featuring a diverse selection of contemporary photography. Issue 7 in stockists now - find out more here.

 
 

Who are you, what's your motto? I’m Luke Archer, editor / founder of Loupe magazine and a photographer in a very loose sense of the word!

I think you can’t go wrong with ‘treat others how you would expect to be treated’ as a motto, it certainly informs my approach to life and Loupe. Funnily enough I think the original quote comes from the book of Luke!

Have you studied photography? What are your thoughts? I studied my BA at UWE and I’m currently studying for my MA at AUB. Many of the Loupe team are recent grads. The magazine goes out to a lot of universities and we do try and feature student work so photography education is an area of interest for us!

There are certain constraints that academia puts on courses to make them a ‘degree’ that I don’t always think are essential for photography. Personally, I think the written elements of courses should be reduced and more emphasis should be put on making sure everyone is technically competent and developing career paths for students. However, photography is a tricky subject to teach, courses tend to be broad and with student dedication so varied it is hard to create a program that will be a perfect fit for each student.

For me studying the BA had a massive impact, the difference in the standard of my work from when I started my BA and finished was huge, I just wish I had spent less time on my dissertation and more time making contacts! That’s very much how I have tried to approach the MA.

I also do worry for current BA students that the fees are incredibly high. I think universities should be covering the cost of London degree shows and more competitions should be free or have low entry cost for students, that’s the feedback we get from our student readers.

What's your favourite style of photography? With Loupe we are trying to show the diversity of photography, how the medium can encompass such a breadth of approaches, so I hope my own taste is as varied I think it is!

That being said, I am a sucker for documentary work where a photographer is able to tell a story through portrait, landscape and detail shots. I’m also becoming very interested in how photographers are incorporating text and interviews into their work to tell a fuller story, currently I’ve been really inspired by the work of Lauren Greenfield and Mahtab Hussain.

Can you tell us what Loupe Magazine is? Loupe is a free photography magazine distributed across the UK. We are stocked at a lot of photography specific locations so I think all our readers are as passionate about photography as we are! As previously mentioned we try and feature a diverse selection of inspiring work.

We launched Issue 1 in May 2016 and have been publishing on a triannual basis ever since.

Who makes up the team behind the magazine? Currently we have designer and co-founder Alec Jackson, Leticia Batty who manages our distribution and Harry Flook who is editor of our web content.

We have a whole host of regular writers including Gemma Padley, Mischa Frankl-Duval, Grace Benton, Alex Ingram and Rosie Wadey, alongside some new recruits who are helping with our web content and will hopefully be writing in future issues. 

We also have Noah and Dan who are doing some research as part of work experience modules for their degrees.

Most of the guys are trying to balance the mag with their own photography / studies and paid work so I try not to overload everyone with tasks. Although you would have to ask them if that’s working out or not!

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Loupe Magazine? Like others we aim to promote new talent but I hope we go the extra mile by sending each issue directly to a lot of people in the photography industry for example: picture editors, curators, ad agency art buyers among many others.

I think that some titles put a deliberate distance between themselves and their readers to somehow inflate their own importance and we don’t want that with Loupe. We are trying to be as open and as approachable as possible. We respond to submissions and give advice when asked (if we can!) and I know from my own experience trying to promote work how much that means to people.

What is Loupe Magazine's biggest achievement to date? Reaching Issue 7! Independent publishing isn’t easy so it is often the small achievements that make it worthwhile. It’s been great to be able to be the first to publish someone’s work in print and then for the project to be picked up by other outlets, or just hearing that our readers appreciate what we do in terms of our general ethos and curation.

It was nice to be shortlisted for the 2017 Stack Awards, the ceremony was great because it was fun to be in a room with so many people obsessed with print.

What do you look for in a photographer who would like to get involved with what you do? We want to feature and promote work that hasn’t had a lot of coverage already. Having said that I am aware that as a free magazine our readership is very broad so I do try and consider that a body of work that might be well known in some areas of the community might be new to others.

For me the best work has a strong and concise concept that has been well executed. If there is a strong degree of originality in both those areas, then that’s the work that grabs my attention.

Curating the magazine is tricky because we have limited pages and that means we have to pass on featuring some very strong work. I feel bad rejecting work because it is not about the quality, it's more about maintaining the diversity of each issue. For example, we have so many people submit amazing documentary work, shot with available light on medium format film but we simply can’t publish it all.

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Try not to let rejection get you down! Although it is something that I still struggle with! There are so many rejections or simply not hearing back from magazines, competitions, potential employers, funding opportunities etc. If you can move forward and keep shooting and keep reaching out to people as opposed to dwelling on it that’s great. There are so many factors beyond the quality of your work that impact on those decisions that we should learn to not take it personally and keep on trucking!

What does the future hold for Loupe Magazine? A new website is top of my list! I want to make sure all the new content we are producing is as easy to access and enjoy as possible.

There are lot of ideas floating about and some vey blue sky thinking! Thankfully with more people helping I hope we can do even more to get to know our readers. A launch event or exhibition for each issue is something we couldn’t do before but hopefully we can put one on for the next issue and everyone can have a beer on us!

Loupe Magazine issue 7

We’ve created a Fellowship with Loupe Magazine and will be bringing you news of brand new issues when they're released. Issue 7 has just landed and includes an interview with Matthew Genitempo who was selected as the winner of our recent collaborative call for work.

You can find a list of local stockists here but if you'd like to subscribe, Loupe are currently offering 20% off subscriptions made before 1st July!


Issue 7 of Loupe is out now! If you are quick copies available for free from our amazing stockists.

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Sticking with our theme of no theme, this issue contains our most diverse range of projects yet. It’s a real celebration of the varied styles in contemporary photography.

Matthew Genitempo won the Loupe x Photograd competition with his project Jasper, a poetic documentation of the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas, and the men who live there. We loved the work so much we decided to put it on the cover.

Image from the series  Jasper  by  Matthew Genitempo

Image from the series Jasper by Matthew Genitempo

Final year student Ema Johnston is featured with her fresh take on the much explored topic of drag, accompanied by Sarah Goad’s words.

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Our online editor Harry Flook talked to Jack Fleming about his new body of work, Punching, which focusses on amateur boxing in Bristol and Brighton.

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Also featured is Lewis Bush’s Shadows of the State alongside an interview with Museum of London curator Anna Sparham and our other regular features.

If you can’t make it to stockist single copies, back issues and annual subscriptions are also available to purchase from our online store.

We hope you enjoy the issue!

Chris Mear: The Penultimate Video From Coalville Photographed

Coalville Photographed, By Graham Ellis
A Series of Short Films By Christopher Mear

In the weeks leading up to this particular Coalville Photographed shoot, which happened to be on the estate Graham has lived for the majority of his time in the town, he had become increasingly interested, excited and vocal about the online photographic guru, Mike Browne. Graham passionately suggested that I watch one particular youtube video of Browne’s above any other. Entitled How dedicated to photography are you?, this particular video was made following a letter Mike received from a man named Peter:

Hi Mike, 

Does it happen with photography like with music, that you could be a professional and/or great photographer if you start at an early age? Does age matter when it comes to becoming an excellent photographer?

To which Mike delivered a 6 and a half minute monologue about the importance of dedication:

Well the thing is, how much do you want to be an ‘excellent photographer’? Is it something you want to do or is it something you’re going to do? But what’s the difference? Well, I’ve been running my photography business for a long time, and many years ago I chose to turn my hobby, which was photography, into my income, and that’s a whole other story. But part of that was that I wanted to be able to travel and see some more of the world, to sort of experience some of the amazing things that go on out there in the world. But it was always ‘something I’d like to do’, and time passed and the business started to grow and I was having a pretty good time, and I didn’t have to work terribly hard to cover my expenses, and I could go and play on my motorbike. But it was always ‘something I’d like to do’. Then, last year, something happened. My brilliant, awesome, inspiring, funny, witty and incredible Mum, died, in September last year. And it was very devastating, despite the fact I knew it was coming. But something in me changed then, I kind of realised how old I was, I kind of realised that ‘hey, you’re in you fifties now and you’ve always wanted to go off and see some more of the world’. But that’s all it was, ‘I wanted to’. And when my Mum died it changed from ‘I want to’, to ‘I’m going to’… I got dedicated to doing whatever it takes to make that happen.

Last year, I was teaching at a local night school, I was just teaching adult education to a bunch of people who were paying a fairly reasonable fee to come on a photography course… but something that really amazed me was that I would give people some homework to do, which was associated with the lesson that we’d just done, and then the following week, quite a large percentage of people would say ‘I didn’t have time this week’, or, I could see that they’d sort of come home and they’d sort of got half an hour before they’d got to jump in the car because they’ve got to go, and they’d sort of done their homework because ‘Mike might grizzle at them’. Well I don’t care if they do the homework or not, and I don’t mind if you guys do the homework or not. I don’t mind what you do, so long as you’re happy. But here’s the key; if you want to take ‘excellent photographs’ or maybe become a professional photographer you’ve got to do the homework, you’ve got to put in the hours, you’ve got to dedicate some time to doing stuff, you have to get out there and practice and get experience.

Photography’s experiential learning - most things in life are. You have to experience it and get the experience so that you know what to do in a given situation. Much as I would love to be able to put my hand up here and go ‘clip’ and unplug knowledge and then insert it into your head for you - for a fee, of course. Then it would be awesome, but I can’t do that. Wouldn’t that be easy? I wouldn’t have to webmaster the site. I wouldn’t have to keep thinking up new ideas for films, shooting stuff and having poor old Lorna standing out in the cold and rain and all that kind of stuff while we’re making films. The thing is, it’s a dedication thing. So, whatever that means for you…

Watch Mike Browne’s full monologue here.

The camera doesn't do anythingCoalville Photographed via YouTube.

Chris Mear: The Sixth Video From Coalville Photographed

Coalville Photographed, By Graham Ellis
A Series of Short Films By Christopher Mear

We're back again with Chris' sixth video!

Showcasing Chris' fortnightly videos for his series is almost at an end, but he's been working on the magazine that will be released and subsequently featured on our Spotlight in the coming months. We can't wait to see the outcome.

Watch the next video in the series to continue the journey with Graham.

I just capture images, Coalville Photographed via YouTube.