COALVILLE PHOTOGRAPHS SELECTED FOR INTERNATIONAL ARTS BIENNIAL

Coalville photographer Christopher Mear has been selected to take part in the UK Young Artist City Takeover in Nottingham (7 – 13 February). Chris has been photographing the town and it’s people for ten years and is delighted to have been selected for one of the largest biennials of national and international artists in the world UKYA City Takeover comes to Nottingham, 7 - 13 February 2019; uniting 250 artists from 25 countries. It will span the city, immersing visitors in an array of extraordinary, innovative and contemporary work, from visual arts to performance; music; applied arts; literature; digital arts and moving image. Expect to encounter art and performance in cultural spaces as well as unusual places. From caves to cafes; markets to museums; studios to the streets - the City Takeover weaves a rich tapestry of venues across Nottingham.

Born, raised and currently living in Leicestershire, Christopher Mear has been making photographs over the last decade about the industrial history of the English landscape and its people, exploring its past and present. Mear uses his photography as a way to understand the social, economic and physical impact that the time of de-industrialisation, which coincided with his own lifetime, has had.

In 2014 Mear began to work with a local photographer he had discovered online; this meeting of artists eventually led to a collaborative project, Mear losing then recovering his photographic mojo and, ultimately, a series of videos and wonderful “shared” photobook produced by Mear. This interesting and unusual take reminds us all of the importance of collaboration and working together with other artists — without competition, not a race to the top, but shared progress, failures and successes.

Christopher will be exhibiting his photographs, books and short films in Sneinton Market during the week long city takeover.

From the series  Coalville Photographed

From the series Coalville Photographed

The Space In Between - A Solo Exhibition by Callum Beaney

Nottingham Trent University graduate Callum Beaney’s first solo exhibition will be opening at Nottingham’s Lakeside Arts from September 15th to October 28th. He is winner of the Genesis Imaging Bursary Award 2017.

The exhibition will present new work made in the forests and tracks surrounding his home, showing two different perspectives on these same places; one a development of his previous work taking form in folded scrolls, and the other an installation of work made at night exploring the limits of human and mechanical perception.

 
From the Lakeside Arts Sep - Nov 18 brochure

From the Lakeside Arts Sep - Nov 18 brochure

 

Building upon my established practice, The Space In Between is a refinement of my attention towards the production of artist books, and towards the forests and their peripheries.

Though at a distance appearing still, as though held from time, the forest’s inhabitants experience perpetual, cycling change. Reflecting aspects of one another in these spaces, these phenomena define themselves in their coexistence, their continuity, these shifting moments revealing their shared aspects - and our place in relation to them. Concerned with this interconnectedness, this transience, and the experience of time and space within these places, I envisage these connections in the form of orihon - folded scrolls.

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Images from the series  The Space In Between

Images from the series The Space In Between

No Flashlight/Sensor Burnout explores these same spaces on the night following a snowstorm. Having forgotten my torch, snow became my guide home, all above ground indiscernible. As clouds blanketed, the eyes’ internal processes revealed themselves; replacing absolute darkness with nonexistent, shifting forms.

The stillness of these places, within which my practice has resided for several years, had suddenly become threatening, space and distance pulling upon one another. Manipulating and exacerbating traces of the residual heat signature of my camera’s sensor, this phenomenon would find a digital analogon, manifesting as simulated vision too began to fail.

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Images from the series  No Flashlight/Sensor Burnout

Images from the series No Flashlight/Sensor Burnout

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