A 2019 Photography Graduate Zine - Submissions Open

Due to the success of previous zines here at Photograd we are hoping to become an advocate for new graduates every year through the creation and production of an annual zine. Whether downloadable or in printed form, our aim is to become a well recognised and respected outlet for brand new talent, showcasing the very best of that years collection of new photographers.

We recognise the market is full and there is an overwhelming amount of competitions to submit to, platforms to show work, and people to reach out to, but Photograd is authentic, original, experimental, and recognised in the industry. Our connections want to see your work and we love the creative process prior to showcasing those we think and know are worthy of our exposure.

We don’t turn people away here at Photograd and aim to accommodate everybody where we possibly can. We want to see all work from BA and MA photography graduates who have completed a UK course in 2019.

This time around our yearly zine will be of downloadable form as we aim to discover our place in the industry for an annual collection of graduate work.


Here are the details

SELECTED GRADUATES

  • At least 15 graduates will be selected for this downloadable zine and will be invoiced for the cost of £5 to cover the time spent producing and promoting.

  • Those selected will receive a free download of the final zine and a discount code for a friend or family member for 50% off.

  • Those selected will be added to the Photograd mailing list and will be informed of future opportunities.

  • Those selected will be sent a copy of the Photograd logo for their website.

ELIGIBILITY AND TERMS & CONDITIONS

  • Open to 2019 photography graduates who studied in the UK only, either on a BA or MA course. Please email with any questions.

  • Entries will only be accepted via photograd2019@gmail.com by the deadline given. No late submissions will be accepted.

  • Make it clear in your submission email if you have specific images you’d like included in the zine if selected.

  • Copyright of all images submitted will be owned by the photographer.

  • Photograd retains the right to use selected images for the intended purpose of the website, and related social media accounts for promotion. Credit will always be given.

THINGS TO INCLUDE WHEN MAKING YOUR ENTRY

  • University and course.

  • A 200 word max series statement.

  • 5 - 10 images attached to the email at 10 inches on the longest side at 96dpi. Download links such as wetransfer will not be accepted. Links to websites will also not be accepted.

  • Website and social media handles.

Submissions are free as always but donations are greatly appreciated. Making a donation will not affect how work is seen, selected, or promoted by Photograd.

Deadline for submissions: Midnight Monday 7th October 2019.

Loupe 10 Open Call

Loupe, a free magazine featuring a diverse selection of contemporary photography.

Image by  Luke Archer

Image by Luke Archer

ABOUT

Issue 10 will be our first themed edition, and we’re kicking off with the weighty topic of national identity. In the glare of recent events, we want discussion around the topic, from all sides.

We’re looking for projects that explore citizens’ relationship to their country, both positive and negative. You might have photographed, white supremacists in America, a border dispute, Brexit in the UK, or your own feelings towards your home country.

Despite the hefty title we are looking for work on a macro and micro scale; you might have spent years documenting a whole country or only days with an individual. The work can be heartbreaking or humorous – so long as it’s an engaging and well executed body of work.

HOW TO SUBMIT

PHOTOGRAPHY 

We are looking for work from all genres of photography, be it fine art, documentary, fashion or commercial. There are no limits; as long as the work connects with our theme of national identity we want to see it. Send either a link to the project on your website or up to 10 web rez jpegs and a short project statement to submissions@loupemag.com.

Please note we cannot accept any form of file sharing link, so make sure your images are small enough to attach to a single email.

BOOK DUMMY SUBMISSION 

If you would like to submit, please send a PDF of your book dummy to submissions@loupemag.com. Please note if you are selected to be featured you will need to send a physical dummy to us. Copies will be returned, although if you live outside of the EU and the dummy is large / heavy we may ask you to make a contribution to the cost.

WRITERS

If you would like to pitch an article, story or write for Issue 10 please email submissions@loupemag.com.

The deadline for submissions is the 5th of August 2019

2019 photography graduates - an open call

Photograd are looking to reward and represent a number of 2019 photography graduates who have studied on BA and MA courses in the UK.


BA graduates

  • 2 graduates will be rewarded with an interview on Photograd which will be promoted across social media channels, newsletter, and to connections in the industry.

  • 1 graduate will be rewarded with an extended Instagram takeover from Monday 15th to Sunday 21st July 2019.

  • 1 graduate will be represented by Photograd for a year. This will include Photograd coverage of any new work, exhibitions, or book releases. Use of the Photograd blog and Instagram account where relevant, and introductions to connections within the industry. We will discuss with this graduate ways in which we can represent and support them.

MA graduates

  • 10 graduates will be selected as ‘highly commended’ and will have work presented on Photograd. This work will be promoted across social media channels, newsletter, and to connections in the industry.

  • 1 graduate will be rewarded with an extended Instagram takeover. This can be scheduled for a later date to suit the graduate.

All successful graduates will be added to the Photograd mailing list and will be sent an exclusive discount code for the online shop.


Eligibility and terms & conditions

  • Open to 2019 photography graduates who studied in the UK only, either on a BA or MA course. Please email with any questions.

  • Entries will only be accepted via photograd2019@gmail.com by the deadline given. No late submissions will be accepted.

  • Make it clear in your submission email if you do not want to be considered for any of the rewards listed above.

  • Copyright of all images submitted will be owned by the photographer.

  • Photograd retains the right to use selected images for the intended purpose of the website, and related social media accounts for promotion. Credit will always be given.

Things to include when making your entry

  • University and course.

  • A 200 word max series statement.

  • BA graduates: a short paragraph telling us why you would like to be represented by Photograd. (Your plans, goals, and things you’d like to achieve within the next year and in the future. Things you have set in place for the next year, and how you think Photograd could support you but not in a financial sense.)

  • 10 - 15 images attached to the email at 10 inches on the longest side at 96dpi. Download links such as wetransfer will not be accepted. Links to websites will also not be accepted.

  • Website and social media handles.


Submissions are free as always but donations are greatly appreciated. Making a donation will not affect how work is seen, selected, or promoted by Photograd.

Deadline for submissions: midnight, Monday 1st July 2019

NEXT EDITION OF PHOTO SCRATCH - APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

Wednesday 12th June 2019, 6-9pm, RPS House, Bristol

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We welcome applications from working documentary photographers and photojournalists. The only criteria for showing work is that it is documentary in nature, and that you are a professional photographer, not currently in full time education, working in the pictures based industries. 

Applications should be made via this online form.

You will be asked to include in your application:

  • A brief description of your project (no more than 200 words)

  • What you hope to gain from doing Photo Scratch – are there particular issues or questions you are encountering to do with your project?

  • A selection of low res jpegs from the proposed project (no more than 5 pictures, no more than 800kb each in file size)

  • Any information you have about how you would want to display the work (prints, contact sheets, projection, etc.)

  • Two links to where your work has been published or shared other than your own website. This should not be the work you are applying with.


Application time line:

  • Deadline: 5pm Wednesday 22nd May 2019

  • Notification of participation - by Monday 27th May 2019

  • Photo Scratch event - Wednesday 12th June 2019 at The Royal Photographic Society, Bristol 


Please note:

  • Photo Scratch is for work-in-progress only.

  • Photo Scratch is predominantly focused on documentary photography and photojournalism, though projects that reach into the art side of things are also welcome if they are rooted in documentary. Challenging the form is always encouraged.

  • There is no fee to apply or participate, but you are responsible for your own costs associated with participating (transport, prints etc.)

  • Photo Scratch is specifically for photographers who are not currently studying.


Supported by The RPS Documentary Group

Introducing The South West Collective of Photography

In this blog post we introduce you to The South West Collective of Photography, a company dedicated to promoting photography and art as a medium in the South West of England. Run by Plymouth University’s recent BA Photography Graduate Samuel Fradley.


Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Samuel Fradley and my motto is to make a positive change within this world.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? For the last 6 years my life has pretty much revolved around some sort of education whether that be from A levels all the way to university; it always involved photography. I studied a BA in Photography at the University of Plymouth and graduated with a first-class honours degree last year.

Image from the series  A Handshake with a Martian  by  Samuel Fradley

Image from the series A Handshake with a Martian by Samuel Fradley

What's your favourite style of photography? I am a big fan of documentary photography, particularly works which are approached as a photographic study. The idea that the photograph freezeframes that moment in time and keeps a record of that story fascinates me. 

Who or what motivates you? I have always been motivated to be my own boss. I suppose I have always had this feeling of rebellion or resentment to those who control or have power to control what I do in my days; I have always wanted to follow my own goals and dreams and through photography I can explore that. I suppose that’s natural as an artist, as you create work within your own perspective. In the last few years I have been really motivated to make a positive change in the photography world. Too many young artists go through education thinking there are little opportunities and it is my absolute goal to change this. 

Image from the series  A Handshake with a Martian  by  Samuel Fradley

Image from the series A Handshake with a Martian by Samuel Fradley

Can you tell us what The South West Collective of Photography is? The South West Collective of Photography is a company dedicated to the promotion of photography and art in the South West. Founded by myself in July 2018 the Collective aims to one day have a permanent gallery or space for artists to work, exhibit and explore their artistic interests. The Collective is a business, but heavily interacts within our local community and voices its opinion on a wide variety of topics that relate to our interests. 

Primarily an online platform, we feature the work of emerging photographer’s and graduates over a variety of social platforms as well as on our own website. This will develop into so much more in the future. 

Image from the series  A Handshake with a Martian  by  Samuel Fradley

Image from the series A Handshake with a Martian by Samuel Fradley

Tell us about the team behind The South West Collective of Photography. Currently, The South West Collective is just myself; Samuel Fradley. In business terms it is just me, but in artist terms that will soon change.

The Collective was always meant to be more than just me; therefore, I am pleased to announce that starting from May, the Collective will begin to announce new members to the Collective family, with our first artist being Ella Cousins. Ella is a recent graduate from Southampton Solent University and will be a fantastic part of the team. Her inspiration, motivation and kind heart is something that is desperately needed in this industry and I am certain she will play her part in inspiring female artists all across the country.

More artists will be announced in time, but I am delighted to say that there will be a strong female presence on the collective, representing and inspiring female artists across the country and further afield with Ella taking a lead on this. 

Image from the series  River  by  Ella Cousins

Image from the series River by Ella Cousins

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for the collective? Honestly when I started the Collective I didn’t have a plan. I’m not really one for long term planning, I have kind of got through life doing everything last minute and it has ironically worked. I knew that I wanted to start an organisation in the South West that represented photography. The primary reasons for this was that the South West has little to no infrastructure for photography. The majority of exhibitions, galleries and institutions are in Bristol or London, but for the thousands of fantastic artists here in the West Country, we have quite literally have nothing. The goals are to change that. I don’t actually pay myself at all from the Collective because I want it to grow. Although in the future I want this to be my living, for now I have to nurture it. 

What is The South West Collective of Photography's biggest achievement to date? Appearing out of nowhere and growing it into a photography platform for artists across the United Kingdom. I have been so privileged and honoured to feature a wide variety of photographers, both students and graduates on the Collective who are so immensely talented, it has just been a fantastic experience hearing people’s stories and watching their work develop. Meeting new people has to be a highlight too, I have encountered so many genuinely lovely people it makes this all worth it.

Image from the series  River  by  Ella Cousins

Image from the series River by Ella Cousins

How can photographers get involved in what you do? At this moment in time, all you have to do is reach out to me via email, Instagram or Facebook. I am more than happy to chat to artists and give advice or discuss featuring them on the Collective. As this Collective grows more opportunities will come about, but for the time being that is the only way to get involved. I am ALWAYS open to new ideas, improvements etc. 

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Ignore what everybody else is doing. Make the work you want to make in the style you want to make it. At the end of the day if somebody doesn’t like your work it’s only an opinion. Don’t fret, figure out what’s right for you and don’t fall into trends or patterns just because something is popular.

Tell us about your goals for The South West Collective of Photography for the future. My goals are to keep on going, to make this my own living and to get out of my part time job. Obviously like mentioned before, the long-term goals are to have our own space, but until that day comes, it’s just a case of going day by day and taking every opportunity that I can to grow The South West Collective. We will be seeking to hold exhibitions, run workshops and artist talks too, to get the public to interact with photography and to inspire the next generation.

Image from the series  River  by  Ella Cousins

Image from the series River by Ella Cousins

What does 2019 have in store for The South West Collective of Photography? 2019 is a huge year for us as it will be our first full year since it was founded. In May we will be hosting our inaugural exhibition. The South West Collective of Photography have been offered the fantastic opportunity to turn a disused, empty shop space on Torquay High street at Fleet walk, into a fully operational public photography exhibition for a duration of 6 weeks beginning in early May 2019. This will be a first in Torbay with regards to photography and will hopefully be the start of something fantastic within the local community and aims to engage with a wide variety of demographics. 

The exhibitions theme is “Visual Story Telling” and will be focusing on local artists and artists from further afield, who have created gripping and engaging photographic bodies of work presenting to the public issues and stories that they may not have ever heard of. We want the exhibition to have as much community engagement as possible and will seek to be holding workshops, talks and visits from local schools, as well as working with local businesses and organisations to try and get the public engaged with photography as a medium and our exhibition. We are hoping to run a series of events and talks from historians and lecturers which will educate students and the public on the selected works themes, in order to educate them on the bigger picture that they otherwise might not be aware of. 

Not only this; we will soon be releasing our brand new website which will have a ton of new content so stay tuned for that!

Positive Light Projects presents Dartmoor Summer School of Photography

Dartmoor Summer School of Photography is a week long experimental photography residential taking place on Dartmoor National Park in the summer of 2019. The Dartmoor Summer School of Photography offers the opportunity for a group of visual artists to join together to explore their relationship with photography with the guidance of a selection of renowned artists and photographers in the midst of one of Britains most beautiful national parks.

Days comprise of workshops, assignments, time to experiment, explore and make work. Evenings offer a variety of activities including talks, music recitals, games, time to make more work, night walks, bird watching, swimming, eating together, sitting round the fire and socialising.

The week ends with a group exhibition of the work made during the residential.

The ethos of the Dartmoor Summer School of Photography is to think outside the box, open up, expect the unexpected, step outside your comfort zone. Experiment. Play. Enjoy. 

 
DSOP Logo.png
 

WORKSHOPS

The week will be split between led workshops with a specific focus and time to develop your own work in response and/or pursue other directions. Students will be able to select 3 out of a possible 5 day long artist led workshops to participate in during the week.

Sian Davey    Presence as an Inquiry   My workshops will be focused on our relationship to our practice. Use your work to explore the bigger inquiry of how did we get here and perhaps where do we want to go.

Sian Davey
Presence as an Inquiry

My workshops will be focused on our relationship to our practice. Use your work to explore the bigger inquiry of how did we get here and perhaps where do we want to go.

Susan Derges    Field Work   In this workshop we will be exploring an intimate and tactile approach to photographing the land and it’s connection to ourselves.

Susan Derges
Field Work

In this workshop we will be exploring an intimate and tactile approach to photographing the land and it’s connection to ourselves.

Jem Southam    Light Atmosphere   This workshop will focus on attention to the relationship between light and atmospheric conditions and the making of colour photographs.

Jem Southam
Light Atmosphere

This workshop will focus on attention to the relationship between light and atmospheric conditions and the making of colour photographs.

Brendan Barry    Constructed Observations   In this workshop we will be constructing a camera obscura, converting it into a giant camera, setting up a darkroom inside and working with it to capture what we can observe and/or construct in front of it using traditional analogue black and white processes.

Brendan Barry
Constructed Observations

In this workshop we will be constructing a camera obscura, converting it into a giant camera, setting up a darkroom inside and working with it to capture what we can observe and/or construct in front of it using traditional analogue black and white processes.

 
Jason Evans    Ant Pictures   Evans’ workshop encourages participants to experience Dartmoor from a different perspective. Relationships between still life and landscape are up for discussion.

Jason Evans
Ant Pictures

Evans’ workshop encourages participants to experience Dartmoor from a different perspective. Relationships between still life and landscape are up for discussion.


Location

The Summer School will be held at The Dartmoor Training Centre not far from Two Bridges, on the banks of the West Dart River in the heart of the Dartmoor National Park, Devon. The Centre lies in a tranquil, secluded valley with easy access to the open moor.

What to bring

Specialist materials needed for workshops will be included, however participants may need to bring some of their own equipment depending on which workshops they partake in. A guide of what you will need to bring will be sent out to successful applicants.

Food

All meals are included. A cooked breakfast, lunch and sit down evening meal, with snacks and drinks available throughout the day. The menu will be vegetarian and as much as possible sourced locally, an effort to reduce our environmental impact. You are welcome to bring extra food. We will endeavour to cater for any extra dietary needs.


Application deadline : extended to 14th April 2019

Applicants will be informed of the results of the selection process by the end of April.

Successful applicants must confirm their participation by payment of the fee within 7 working days of notification. 

Contact.
Twitter.
Instagram.

Introducing Landform

In this blog post we introduce you to Landform, a network developed to promote and support the work of female landscape photographers. Supporting each other in practice and engagement with landscape.


Image by Lisa Bond

Image by Lisa Bond

Who are you, what’s your motto? I am Cath Stanley, a landscape and fine art photographer based in Manchester.  I am one of the members of FORM Collective, a relatively new collective who has just completed a successful first year.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I graduated with a creative arts degree and have taught graphics and photography in further education for the last 17 years. Having taught in an art department you become quite familiar with many creative techniques, my last project took on a more mixed media style.

I am part of FORM collective, a group of talented photographers and image makers from across the UK.  Last year we put together our first exhibition at the collective hub as part of Brighton Photo Fringe.  

Image by Cath Stanley

Image by Cath Stanley

What’s your favourite style of photography? That is a difficult question, I actually like and appreciate a lot of different styles of photography. Although my main work is based in the area of landscape, I often find great interest in alternative photography techniques, I like the aesthetic of film and some of the camera-less methods. I like photography with an interesting story behind it, something that opens conversations or raises questions, expresses a point of view or just simply engages the audience in different ways.  

Who motivates you? I love travel and adventure, I like exploring and different types of landscape really motivate me. I have always been a bit of a daydreamer and spent quite a bit of my early education staring out of the window at the outdoors. The idea of just being able to lose yourself amongst mist shrouded mountains, or explore wild moors, see sun rays beaming through clouds or capture forests of tightly knit trees, it is the landscape itself gives me a real sense of wellbeing. Sometimes I return to locations and document the change in seasonal colours as this particularly interests me.

Image by Joanne Coates

Image by Joanne Coates

Can you tell us what Landform is? I set up Landform as a network to develop, promote and support the work of female photographers who are interested in landscape. Through social media, meet ups at various locations around the UK, photo walks, portfolio/work reviews, workshops and possible exhibitions it is my aim to support others in our practice and engagement with landscape.

Landform aims to bring female photographers together, of all levels and abilities, to encourage a supportive group, to share good practice and skills, whilst exploring new areas within the landscape as a group. 

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Landform? There are lots of reasons to why I set up Landform, firstly landscape photography can be quite solitary and some of the best light to capture during the day is tricky especially if you live in a city. Having a community, a group of like-minded individuals to support and share good practice with means we can explore and engage new locations safely.  

There is also a real imbalance of female photographers to males in industry, with just under 30%, maybe even less in landscape. As a female landscape photographer, full time teacher and a mum it is very hard to gain a balance, to juggle all the responsibilities to just be able to drop everything and go out to take photographs. Most importantly that no matter what your photographic ability is or whether using a mobile phone, I would like Landform to be open to all.

Image by Lisa Bond

Image by Lisa Bond

What is Landforms biggest achievement to date? Landform is very much within its infancy, but I have had overwhelming support from both other photography networks and groups of people who are interested in supporting or joining me at events. I am a big fan of using social media to share other peoples accounts and promote work, I think that sometimes as photography can be quite isolated and using social media can be for some quite daunting it is difficult to become lost, especially as landscape photography is so popular. I have received so many positive and heart-warming messages from followers who are genuinely surprised that I have shared their accounts. 

Image by Joanne Coates

Image by Joanne Coates

How can photographers get involved in what you do? Landform on Instagram offers a place for female landscape photographers or image makers of any level to share their images, it is a platform to promote their work and a space that is a supportive community for other like-minded individuals.   

Later this year I am running a series of social meet ups and photo walks out in the Peak District and other locations, building our community and enabling individuals to meet, share good practice, create new opportunities 

Image by Cath Stanley

Image by Cath Stanley

Give one tip to new photography graduates? Opportunities, take opportunities and then create opportunities for others because everyone needs a bit of help just to grow and to believe in themselves.

What does 2019 have in store for Landform? As Landform is still in its very early stages I am hoping to establish a community and the support for others grows both on social media and on photo walks.

Join Photo Scratch on Monday 18th February 2019 for their next edition

Click here to book your FREE ticket.

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A night for new ideas, Photo Scratch is an opportunity for documentary photographers to understand how their work is perceived and gain valuable insight into how to take their work further with the benefit of other people’s outside eye. For spectators this is an opportunity to preview projects, offer feedback, and engage in conversations about photography.

The format of the night involves a group of six to eight photographers previewing a project in an incomplete state. These photographers are selected in advance based on informal applications. Each photographer is given a wall space to display their work in any way they see fit (rough prints, contact sheets, annotations, captions, text, projection etc.). The audience, comprised of other photographers, friends, people within the industry and anyone with an interest in documentary photography, are then welcome to discuss the work and leave written feedback for each project. This valuable written feedback is then kept by each photographer for future reference. The night is free for all to attend, but booking is required. There is a bar in the gallery.

Our first edition of 2019 will feature work-in-progress from:
Rita Alvarez www.tudelaphotography.com

Tee Byford www.tearlach.co.uk

Julie Meresse www.juliemeresse.com

Hassan Nezamian www.hassannezamian.com

Marie Smith www.marieesmith.com

Alexandra Waespi www.alexandrawaespi.com

Introducing Fable & Folk

There seems to be a running theme in our recent blog posts here at Photograd as we introduce you to some other online communities and networks.
In this blog post we introduce you to Fable & Folk, an independent platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire.

We think Charlotte’s answers are really inspiring so we hope you enjoy a read through them.

If you have something to share or talk about on the blog, get in touch!

Kate Walker,  A Day Away From the Farm , 2018

Kate Walker, A Day Away From the Farm, 2018

Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Charlotte and I’m a recent photography graduate. I wouldn’t say I have a motto, but one of my favourite quotes is “comparison is the thief of joy”. I think this applies so much within the photographic community - I spent years looking at other people’s work and thinking it was so much better than my own. Once I learnt to value my own work and not compare myself to others, I produced my best photography to date.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I was born in Manchester but grew up in a small village in North Lincolnshire. I started studying photography at A Level then moved to Cheltenham to study Editorial & Advertising Photography at The University of Gloucestershire. I graduated in November and recently got a job as a Content Creation Manager at an independent company specialising in homeware and DIY products. I plan on travelling in a couple of years time and would like to start my own photobook business in the future.

Charlotte Colenutt,  Soul Mate , 2018

Charlotte Colenutt, Soul Mate, 2018

What's your favourite style of photography? I wouldn’t say I have a favourite genre of photography, I love and appreciate photographs that tell a story or photographs that have thought and craftsmanship behind them. My specialisation, however, is documentary photography because I love to talk to people. I love to dedicate time to speaking to someone, finding out their story and trying to capture that. Moreover, I love finding out the story behind an interesting place and trying to document every inch of it to best tell it’s story to others.

Who or what motivates you? I have been passionate about photography for years now. I guess what motivates me to photograph is I feel a need to tell people’s stories and share them. I feel motivated by what’s going on in the world and by finding stories I haven’t seen/heard told before. I also surround myself with other photography - photobooks, magazines, social media accounts, organisations and blogs - to inspire me and keep me constantly thinking of new ideas.

Can you tell us what Fable & Folk is? Fable & Folk is an online platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire others. Directed at young or aspiring photographers, it’s a space I curate and share narratives and photo-stories. I want to develop Fable & Folk into more than just a blog sharing others work but an online hub - full of information from fellow budding photographers and the professionals whilst keeping my audience updated with current affairs in the photographic world.

Gweniver Exton,  Spiritual Spaces , 2018

Gweniver Exton, Spiritual Spaces, 2018

Tell us about the team behind Fable & Folk. There isn’t really a team at Fable & Folk, it’s mostly just me. I tend to be involved in every step of the process from recruiting a photographer to feature to the end blog post and sharing that on social media. I don’t feel I would be 100% truthful though if I said I did everything. Sometimes, my partner Adam Elliott and a few great friends from university, particularly Megan Bendall, are a great assistance in helping me find new and exciting work. It’s difficult running the operation mostly on my own but I consider it my baby and even if I had a full team of amazing staff, I’d still want to be involved in everything.

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fable & Folk? Fable & Folk started when I was studying at university and couldn’t decide what I wanted to do for a career - all I knew was that I love photobooks. I love designing them, constructing them and collecting them. Eventually my tutor Grant Scott and I decided the best way for me to pursue a career in photobooks would be for me to start my own publishing company. To build an audience, you first need to create a blog that naturally attracts an audience that will eventually move from the blog, to your company. I can’t thank Grant and my university peers enough for their support of Fable & Folk and if you haven’t already, I recommend listing to Grant’s podcast series ‘A Photographic Life’.

Jordan Turnbull,  A Rock and a Hard Place , 2018

Jordan Turnbull, A Rock and a Hard Place, 2018

What is Fable & Folk's biggest achievement to date? I’ve never been one to keep track of numbers or views. I know it sounds cheesy but I would say my biggest achievement is having had the chance to be in contact with so many fantastic photographers and to have built a hub of Fable & Folk support on Twitter. I feel so proud of where Fable & Folk is, who our biggest supporters are and most importantly, the list of photographers I get to consider friends and mentors.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? We always love being contacted by photographers! If you’re interested in submitting to Fable & Folk, visit our ‘Contact’ page for more details. We don’t have specifics on what the series should necessarily be or look like, we only ask you send us a strong narrative. THAT’S IT. That’s not to say we accept all work but we always want to offer something - whether it’s a feature on the blog or advice on how to develop the work to eventually get it featured. We also love getting constructive criticism and positive feedback from our audience on F&F so please feel free to message us or drop us an email.

Adam Elliott,  For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal , 2018

Adam Elliott, For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal, 2018

Give one tip to new photography graduates. If I could give one tip to new photography graduates I would stress the importance of networking - whether it’s through social media or attending events, it’s vital to make contact with other photographers. Networking so much during my course has meant that since leaving university, and trying to grow Fable & Folk, I have had endless support and mentorship from so many different photographers and influencers within the community - special thanks to Iain Sarjeant for giving me heaps of advice when the blog first started and to Chloe Juno for motivating me and offering so much help. In addition, I think it’s even more helpful if you’re struggling mentally, feeling overwhelmed or lost, to talk to someone in the same boat so don’t be afraid to reach out!

What does 2019 have in store for Fable & Folk? I don’t want to give too much away but I’m hoping 2019 will be a game changer for Fable & Folk. I really want to get more interviews on the blog and I’d like to try and get a new feature on the site where I share exhibitions, events and workshops for people to attend. I’d also potentially like to rebrand - new website, new logo - so the brand evolves with the work and the audience. I hope we can really develop into a fully realised online platform featuring lots of different important yet inspirational content for budding photographers/ photography enthusiasts.

Introducing Flourish

In this blog post we introduce you to Flourish, a magazine all about thriving in a particular place, community, culture and flourishing in the outdoors. Flourish are currently seeking support through their Kickstarter campaign to bring their second issue to life which will be all about the British Isles. Check out their great rewards here - we’ve pre-ordered ourselves a copy!


Volume 1 of Flourish

Volume 1 of Flourish

My name is Lucy Jane Saunders and I am a Bath Spa University Photography graduate. I started photography years before going to university as a hobby, inspired by the disposable film camera images my dad would bring home and develop after his travels abroad. I never anticipated it could become my job, yet it slowly immersed me into the world of photography and its potentials. At university my style narrowed and I found my preferred way of working. Photographers such as Jon Tonks, Colin Pantell and Robert Darch inspired my documentary approach to photographing. Yet being outdoors, travelling, and finding new locations really motivated me to keep making new work. 

After graduating two years ago I started freelancing alongside setting up the magazine publication ‘Flourish’. I have always adored working within print production and love magazine design. I initially created it out of pure passion, the desire to create new work, and design pages where photographs and text interacted on the page telling stories. But once the first volume was made I almost felt selfish keeping it to myself… the stories I had encountered travelling, the archive of photographs I had collected and the other people I collaborated with. I decided to launch a Kickstarter Campaign to see if other creatives would be interested in supporting the publication to get the magazine to print. To my surprise we achieved our target! People from all over the world backed the campaign and three months later we had enough funding to get the magazine to the printers. I sat in the post office for hours posting a host of magazines to backers and from there I tried to gain stockists to hold the rest.

Flourish became a brand rooted from its definition: “(of a living organism) grow or develop in a healthy or vigorous way, especially as the result of a particularly congenial environment.” As humans we are constantly seeking new, intriguing, and stimulating locations to explore, travel, and experience. Flourish aims to capture those moments we treasure; the bright colours, the tastes we remember, and most importantly the time spent thriving within that place. 

I wanted to capture not only the sensual elements of a location, but also its underlying struggles, and those who have met and overcome the challenges of sustainability. Those who live from the land, create from the land, and are protecting and flourishing with the nature that surrounds them.  

In recent years, photographic magazines have been blurring the lines between books and throwaway publications. Flourish is a magazine with stability, acting as a visual map for your mind, a great piece of reading material for your rucksack, and some inspiration to enjoy with your morning coffee. 

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Flourish will remind you that life is an experience, to capture those moments from other lives you cross paths with, to think more about what surrounds us in the landscapes you gaze at, and to speculate more on your next adventure.

Over the past year Flourish has thrived and I started to stock the publication in more and more independent stores. Due to the unexpected work I had to start bringing people on board and the Flourish team started to grow. My amazing supportive family started to help me get a website together, social media sites, help package, proof read and blog. It almost became a full time job for myself. 

My biggest achievement for the publication so far was definitely an unexpected win at the Creative Bath Awards in the summer of 2018. Winning Young Creative was an outstanding achievement for myself and for the magazine team. As we went from strength to strength I found the need to make more work and I was conscious people would be expecting a second volume. Depleted of money with the print of volume 1 and the lack of freelance work I could do, I find myself back in the same position as I was in with volume 1…. It’s never easy setting up a business and the profit from print is minimal, at least for the first couple of volumes. I have set up another Kickstarter to support volume 2 titled A Snippet of The British Isles where we collaborate with more photographers, writers and illustrators than we did previously in volume 1. 

Our Kickstarter Campaign is now in its last 30 days, so we are currently half way through. We are really close to making our target to get the publication to print and we would love the support of fellow photographers, creatives, and others who are passionate about the subject of Travel, Culture, Sustainability and Outdoor Living. Our campaign acts as a pre-ordering service…. where you can pre-order volume 2 A Snippet of The British Isles but also the possibility of gaining other rewards such a one off prints, illustrations and getting your name within the volume. 

If you would be interested in supporting the publication please visit our page here.

I am always on the look out for new photographers to feature within the publication. I love collaborating and love working with other graduates and fresh graduates as I was once in this position myself. I am always on the look out for something unique… someone who can create innovate stories through their pictures and who are enthusiastic about their work! 

Introducing Fiiiirst

In this blog post we introduce you to Fiiiirst, an online gallery showcasing anonymous discussions between authors photographers. Every month, two photographers are invited to interact through an image-based discussion. To keep this dialog without a pre-formated vision, the identities of each author are kept secret until the end of their respective discussion. Each picture produced is used as an inspiration to create the next one.


Who are you, what's your motto? I’m Guillaume Tomasi, a french-canadian photographer based in Montreal. 

What’s your background? Before doing photography I was a creative developer in several design studios in Geneva and in Montreal. During that time, I was addicted to creating beautiful websites with complex animations and visual effects. When I moved from France to Canada, I discovered a new city and at the same time I wanted to capture this new place with a digital camera. Slowly, photography became an obsession and in 2016 I decided to leave my job, and dedicated my time to photography.

Thomas Bouquin , Montreal

Thomas Bouquin, Montreal

Have you studied photography?  When I left my job I decided to start a BFA in Photography at Concordia University in Montreal. I discovered analog photography; how to developed negatives and how to print in the darkroom. I wanted to be more coherent when I was working on a photo project: How can I translate a subject into visuals.

It was not easy to return to school with two kids so I studied part-time and I will finally complete my degree in 2020.

What's your favourite style of photography? Its changed over time. At the beginning, I was very interested in black and white street photography - Cartier Bresson, Winogrand, Robert Frank, etc... After that I became strongly attached to colour - Joel Sternfeld, Stephen Shore, Todd Hido, etc…

Now I am more and more interested in communicating something personal who can touch a larger audience, like a universal feeling or situation. And working with something fictional is a new method that I want to implement into my future projects. An imaginary subject that can relate to our lives or society.

Kent Andreasen , Cape Town

Kent Andreasen, Cape Town

Who or what motivates you? Ideas! The moment where a tiny and simple idea becomes something bigger, where everything is possible. It really excites and motivates me.

I noticed that I am very confident at the beginning of a project because I have many pictures in mind. After that, I feel frustrated and disappointed by my results because nothing looks like what I had in mind. Slowly the project becomes something completely different that the initial idea. It's like a short moment of grief everytime.

I find inspiration in classical fields such as literature, cinema and music, but my latest projects are often sentences that I heard from discussion or a mundane situation.   

Sophie Barbasch , New York

Sophie Barbasch, New York

Can you tell us what Fiiiirst is? Sure! Fiiiirst is an online gallery showcasing anonymous discussions between authors photographers. Every month, two photographers are invited to interact through an image-based discussion. The main detail is that the photographers don’t know with whom they discuss until the discussion is completed and published on the website.

They upload their pictures into a private area and send an anonymous email to the other artist. The first artist then creates a picture. The second one receives it and uses it as an inspiration to create another picture. The discussion continues until they reach a certain amount of photographs.

I wanted this experience to be anonymous when they discuss the images so to remove the ego complex or to dictate which style (or photographs) they will then create based on the universe of their penfriend. 

Maela Ohana , Montreal

Maela Ohana, Montreal

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fiiiirst? When I discovered photography and started to follow some contemporary photographers, I noticed that they was a small community where everyone knew the name or the works of each others. I became curious in imagining what would be the result if this artist collaborated with another one, and it was a great opportunity to challenge their creative practice by placing them with another artist whose work is very different in aesthetics or themes. 

What is Fiiiirst’s biggest achievement to date? Currently, the 3rd edition is running and I really appreciate the critical response for each discussion. I receive more and more submissions for future editions and it’s very difficult to decide which one will be chosen.

When I started the first edition I had nothing except a concept and now there are 80 photographers from 29 different countries involved.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? If people want to participate they can simply send me their portfolio at guillaume@fiiiirst.com because the recruitment for the 4th edition is open until the end of January!!  They can also follow our Facebook and Instagram page to get the latest discussions and news about Fiiiirst.

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Do your thing without anticipating awards, recognitions etc… Your work will benefit to be outside this stressful and unnecessary circle. Also, don’t tease too much of your work before a publication. Consider the quality instead of the quantity on social media. It will be good in the long term. 

What does 2019 have in store for Fiiiirst? In 2019, I am going to publish the first "Fiiiirst book” which will regroup pictures from the first two editions. It won’t be the same as the website but the pictures will be mixed or edit into a global and hybrid discussion.

I hope to be able to present to you this book in the summer. It’s difficult to say exactly when it’s going to be real, because Fiiiirst is a pro-bono side project which take a lots of time and I it’s just me working on it. I will create a kickstarter campaign in a few days/weeks. 

In June 2019 I am going to launch the 4th edition of Fiiiirst and right now I am very excited when I see the names of some shortlisted photographers.

Wellcome launches £20,000 photography prize to showcase powerful stories about health

A new international photography prize celebrating compelling imagery that captures stories of health, medicine and science launches today. Wellcome Photography Prize invites photographers to enter their images which highlight the most challenging health issues of our time.

The overall winner of Wellcome Photography Prize will receive a £15,000 prize, with the winner of each of the four categories receiving £1,250. Prizes will be presented at an awards ceremony in London in summer 2019.

Winning entries will also be showcased in a public exhibition at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London in July 2019. The shortlisted entries will be shown alongside a photo series commissioned by Wellcome, which will tell an in-depth story on the theme of ‘outbreaks’ from the perspective of a celebrated documentary photographer, to be announced later this year.

Key dates

Deadline for entries
17 December 2018

Winners announced
3 July 2019

Exhibition opens
4 July 2019

Submit your entry here


Categories

There are four categories in the competition:

  • Social perspectives – explore how health and illness affect the way we live

  • Hidden worlds – reveal details hidden to the naked eye

  • Medicine in focus – show health and healthcare up close and personal

  • Outbreaks (2019 theme) – capture the impact of disease as it spreads

Microparticle drug delivery  by Annie Cavanagh / Wellcome Image Award winner 2009 / Credit: Annie Cavanagh. CC BY-NC

Microparticle drug delivery by Annie Cavanagh / Wellcome Image Award winner 2009 / Credit: Annie Cavanagh. CC BY-NC

Inside Ghana's biggest bushmeat market  by Nyani Quarmyne / published on  mosaicscience.com / Credit: Nyani Quarmyne / Panos Pictures 2016

Inside Ghana's biggest bushmeat market by Nyani Quarmyne / published on mosaicscience.com/ Credit: Nyani Quarmyne / Panos Pictures 2016

Two young boys in rural Nicaragua  by Joshua McDonald / Wellcome Image Awards winner 2017/ Credit: Joshua McDonald

Two young boys in rural Nicaragua by Joshua McDonald / Wellcome Image Awards winner 2017/ Credit: Joshua McDonald

The man with the golden blood  by Greg White / published on  mosaicscience.com  / Credit: Greg White / Wellcome 2014

The man with the golden blood by Greg White / published on mosaicscience.com / Credit: Greg White / Wellcome 2014

Prizes and publicity

Images will be shortlisted and then winners chosen by a panel of high-profile judges.

The winner of each category will receive £1,250, with the overall winner receiving a prize of £15,000. Prizes will be presented at an awards ceremony in London on 3 July 2019.

All the winning and shortlisted entries will go on show in a major public exhibition at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 4-13 July 2019.

If you’re a winner, we will also offer you opportunities to take part in events to showcase your work to a range of audiences. Our winning images receive extensive international media coverage each year.

The winner of the Medicine in Focus category will be invited to produce the Julie Dorrington commission, a photo story exploring and documenting a patient’s journey with their condition.

Judges panel

The judges for the 2019 prize are:

  • Emma Bowkett, Director of Photography at FT Weekend Magazine, UK

  • Dan M. Davis, Professor of Immunology at the University of Manchester, UK

  • Dr Heidi Larson, Director of The Vaccine Confidence Project at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK

  • Joanne Liu, International President of Médecins Sans Frontières, Switzerland

  • Pete Muller, National Geographic Photographer and Fellow, Kenya

  • Azu Nwagbogu, Curator at Large for Photography at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, South Africa

  • Chair: Jeremy Farrar, Director, Wellcome, UK.


Entries to the Wellcome Photography Prize 2019 will be accepted on its website which contains full terms and conditions for entry. The deadline for entries is 17 December 2018.

Wellcome Photography Prize 2019 exhibition will open at Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 4 to 13 July 2019. Entry will be free and open to all.

Sign up to Wellcome Photography Prize emails.

Follow on Instagram: @WellcomePhotoPrize #WPP19


Source: https://wellcome.ac.uk/what-we-do/our-work...

Current Professional Development Opportunities from GRAIN and FORMAT

GRAIN Portfolio Development Day | 13th October | 10am - 4.30pm | Birmingham City University, Parkside Building. 

We will be joined by: Camilla Brown Curator, writer and lecturer on contemporary art, specialising in photography. Award winning photographer and Magnum nominee Lua Ribiera. Acclaimed photographer Andrew Jackson who was the recipient of the Autograph ABP 2018/Lightwork International Photography Residency in Syracuse, New York. As well as Freelance Project Manager Seba Chaudhry who has worked on major projects including Rhubarb Rhubarb and Format International Photography Festival.

The day will be split into two parts a morning of talks and in the afternoon an opportunity for one to one portfolio reviews.

Please note there will be a maximum of 20 attendees to enable a focussed day. Tickets are priced at £25 or £18 Concessions (Students, OAP, Low or No pay).

For more information and to book a ticket please click here.

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GRAIN AND FORMAT/QUAD MASTERCLASSES OPEN CALL | Deadline 7th October

East Meets West is a collaborative project devised by FORMAT International Photography Festival/QUADand GRAIN Projects.  This year we will be offering a series of Masterclasses leading to an opportunity to showcase your work at FORMAT19.

At the Masterclasses you will learn from industry leaders such about portfolio development and receive advice regarding topics such as, competitions, commissions, exhibitions, funding, making approaches, distribution and editing.  Subjects will also include socially engaged, editorial and fine art photography, the photobook and responding to and working to commission. The Masterclasses will offer immersion in the subject matter and a unique opportunity for emerging photographers to develop their practice and showcase their work.

Masterclass speakers and portfolio reviewers include Natasha CaruanaHarry HardieAndrew JacksonAnthony LuveraMatthew MurrayKate Peters and Michael Sargeant.

Deadline to apply 7th October.

For further information and how to apply please click here.

 
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Introducing Findr

In this blog post we introduce you to findr, a brand new platform supporting photographers and finding them work. They simplify the search and booking process of photographers for work by giving direct access through their platform.

Findr can help if you are a photographer or need a photographer!

 
 

What is findr? Findr is an online booking platform through which photographers can showcase their skills and find more work. It was created for photographers, by photographers who grew tired of the unnecessary struggles that come with marketing oneself, finding clients, and arranging bookings. Findr aims at making it easier for photographers to find work that fits around their schedules, while still respecting their independence and artistic freedom.

Who are you? What's your photographic background? I am a photographer and picture editor from Edinburgh. I worked in the press industry for 15 years. I particularly enjoy portraiture, and marketing and events photography that gives me the ability to tell stories for the clients.

How did the platform emerge? The platform emerged from the need to create a solution to an everyday problem I faced as a picture editor: how to quickly and simply find photographers I could trust to work on projects I was involved in.

Image by Harry Spekter

Image by Harry Spekter

Who's behind Findr? Tell us about the team. Findr is made of a small team of people dedicated to improving the landscape of commissioned photography. The technology is created by Ben, Josh, and Rob, while the operational excellence is handled by Alex, Christian, and Pauline. And, of course, we'd be nothing without the community of over 3,000 amazing photographers we're lucky enough already be working with!

Who would you ideally like to get involved with Findr? We're looking for hardworking, reliable, and creative photographers interested in accelerating or improving their careers and in working with a growing list of great brands through findr.

Image by Michael Sheridan

Image by Michael Sheridan

How can people go about being part of the platform? It's super easy and quick! Head over to www.findr.me and create your photographer profile. You can add your portfolio, all the services you offer, and manage your own schedule.

Who is Findr's audience? Findr is meant for a community of professional photographers and clients who love and benefit from good photography.

What are the benefits of being part of or using Findr? New work, new opportunities, so little hassle! By signing up to work with findr, you join a direct route to work without any of the hardships that come along with being a freelance photographer, and companies receive an efficient management system for their projects.

Image by Pooyan

Image by Pooyan

What does Findr's future look like? Here at findr, we love to dream big! Our goal is to become the global marketplace for professional photographers and customers on an international scale.

Follow findr on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.