Introducing Findr

In this blog post we introduce you to findr, a brand new platform supporting photographers and finding them work. They simplify the search and booking process of photographers for work by giving direct access through their platform.

Findr can help if you are a photographer or need a photographer!

 
 

What is findr? Findr is an online booking platform through which photographers can showcase their skills and find more work. It was created for photographers, by photographers who grew tired of the unnecessary struggles that come with marketing oneself, finding clients, and arranging bookings. Findr aims at making it easier for photographers to find work that fits around their schedules, while still respecting their independence and artistic freedom.

Who are you? What's your photographic background? I am a photographer and picture editor from Edinburgh. I worked in the press industry for 15 years. I particularly enjoy portraiture, and marketing and events photography that gives me the ability to tell stories for the clients.

How did the platform emerge? The platform emerged from the need to create a solution to an everyday problem I faced as a picture editor: how to quickly and simply find photographers I could trust to work on projects I was involved in.

Image by Harry Spekter

Image by Harry Spekter

Who's behind Findr? Tell us about the team. Findr is made of a small team of people dedicated to improving the landscape of commissioned photography. The technology is created by Ben, Josh, and Rob, while the operational excellence is handled by Alex, Christian, and Pauline. And, of course, we'd be nothing without the community of over 3,000 amazing photographers we're lucky enough already be working with!

Who would you ideally like to get involved with Findr? We're looking for hardworking, reliable, and creative photographers interested in accelerating or improving their careers and in working with a growing list of great brands through findr.

Image by Michael Sheridan

Image by Michael Sheridan

How can people go about being part of the platform? It's super easy and quick! Head over to www.findr.me and create your photographer profile. You can add your portfolio, all the services you offer, and manage your own schedule.

Who is Findr's audience? Findr is meant for a community of professional photographers and clients who love and benefit from good photography.

What are the benefits of being part of or using Findr? New work, new opportunities, so little hassle! By signing up to work with findr, you join a direct route to work without any of the hardships that come along with being a freelance photographer, and companies receive an efficient management system for their projects.

Image by Pooyan

Image by Pooyan

What does Findr's future look like? Here at findr, we love to dream big! Our goal is to become the global marketplace for professional photographers and customers on an international scale.

Follow findr on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

PGZ2018 | The second edition of Photograd's zine

Introducing the second edition of Photograd's zine, PGZ2018 | Celebrating those photographers who are graduating university this year from UK based courses. Available to purchase in the Photograd online shop, PGZ2018 praises brand new photographic talent.

This year we are promoting 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses in various ways; interviews, sharing of work, and aiming to reach a much wider audience. With support from Spectrum Photographic on this particular project we have been able to showcase new graduates through the second edition of PGZ. Here we introduce you to PGZ2018.

This summer we received entries from new photography graduates and we're celebrating this talent through the second edition of PGZ. PGZ2018 showcases work from 11 photographers from various universities across the UK including University of the Arts London, University of Salford, and The University of the West of England.

From calling for work, receiving more submissions than ever before, to the final judging process with the help of Hazel Watts of Spectrum Photographic, we have been presented with a much wider variety of photography that's new to the scene this year. We're starting to notice trends in research, subject matter, and outcome, and we're excited to bring you an array of this to you through PGZ2018.

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Natalie Paetzold and the series  Finding the Void

Natalie Paetzold and the series Finding the Void

Jay Goodsell and the series  Portus Dubris

Jay Goodsell and the series Portus Dubris

University of the Arts London graduate Joanna Wierzbicka presents her series The Point Where We Meet which we've also featured as the cover image.

"The point where we meet is a surface forming a common line between two bodies, spaces, layers. Fashion becomes the translation of persona, appears as a boundary between us and others, almost like a mask or a second skin. It makes us feel comfortable and confident, allows to create the image of the self and coincide with others.
Garments perform the function of masking and wrapping - they deform and deconstruct the human form, but also in some cases fail and reveal the natural shape of the body, its pure, naked form. They conceal and reveal at the same time, causing the coexistence between absence and presence allowing surfaces to meet.
Within this series, there are also elements of an embodiment, disembodiment, and the awareness of bodily sensations achieved through the tactility of clothing."

Images from the series  The Point Where We Meet  by Joanna Wierzbicka

Images from the series The Point Where We Meet by Joanna Wierzbicka

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MFA Photography graduate from the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Natalie Paetzold introduces us to Finding the Void.

"Finding the Void is rooted in the desire to free one‘s head from one’s thoughts through the rhythm of walking within a nature setting. Placing one step in front of another helps to clear one‘s mind due to the ongoing act of repetition. The body of work is an investigation into meditation and landscape. Through the use of digitally reconstructed photography the work explores an immersion into both land and seascapes, creating a conscious state of being. Both surroundings allow contemplation through different visual experiences; being an active practitioner or being an observer. The ambiguous spheres create an awareness of the indexical nature of the photograph and blend the past, present and future together. Through walking, wandering, thinking and looking these strikingly coloured images reflect on ideas of phenomenology and perception, whilst also considering the possibilities of parallel worlds."

 
Image from the series  Finding the Void  by Natalie Paetzold

Image from the series Finding the Void by Natalie Paetzold

 

University of East London graduate Jay Goodsell presents his series Portus Dubris.

"Portus Dubris which derives from the towns roman beginnings, is a body of work that explores Dovers landscapes, not only is it undergoing major structural changes, the town still hangs within the unknown when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s often a forgotton place, and recently receiving a lot of negative press. The small but vital town to the country was voted at number one as the ‘worst place to live within the UK’. Dover is the entry point for many visiting guests from the continent, which left the question, what is so bad about the town to be voted number one?"

Images from the series  Portus Dubris  by Jay Goodsell

Images from the series Portus Dubris by Jay Goodsell

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PGZ2018 is available to buy here in the Photograd Shop.

Photobook Review: 'Coalville Photographed' reviewed by Lucy Bentham

We're constantly thrilled and excited that Photograd has the ability to bring together creatives and form unique collaborations. Graduate and working photographer Chris Mear created Coalville Photographed last year and recently approached independent curator and photographer Lucy Bentham to review the publication.

Here are the results.


Coalville Photographed by Graham Ellis: A series of short films and photographs by Christopher Mear

Self published edition of 25

At first glance, the cover of this book gives little detail as to what might be found within the pages. A series of eight QR codes are neatly arranged above the title suggesting, perhaps, that this book contains a cold, technological study of something, well, cold and technology based. The reality is quite different. 

In fact, the book contains fifty images made by both the author and the photographer he has collaborated with to construct this narrative. Mear has followed a fellow photographer making photographs in his local area in order to become closer to the place and this has resulted in a deeper understanding of both the place and methodology. Initially, this method of documenting place becomes twice removed from the subject as Mear puts himself of the position of the documenter documenting the documenter. I am drawn to this notion in the way that if only we could document ourselves as we undertake a project, our methodologies would be in the spotlight, and what becomes of our chosen subjects?

It is clear, throughout the book, that Mear is continually questioning Ellis about his methods and position as a photographer and vice versa:

‘How much do you want to be an ‘excellent’ photographer? Is it something you want to do or is it something you’re going to do? But what’s the difference?’

Ellis asks this of Mear and Mear asks a number of questions pertaining to photography as an art with a series of interspersed quotations from famed photographers throughout. 

We pursue Mear following Ellis during the series of moving images (found on YouTube via the QR codes) and, if you can see around the few technical issues – like the increasingly maddening flatlining sound from the van, or the obstruction of road noise drowning Ellis’ voice – then these monochrome records deepen our connection with Ellis. In contrast to the sense gauged from the book, the moving image additionally distances Mear from his associations with the place, presenting mostly as the cameraperson with a few indications that he remains as the camera occasionally wanders off to the side to look at something he is interested in, not Ellis. Because of this apparent distinction, I question whether the book and the moving image are unified from the perspective of the viewer. The moving image existing without the book makes Mear invisible and puts him in the sole position of the cameraperson – yet his presence is palpably felt within the pages of the book. 

 
 

This book, and the project it contains, is achingly familiar as a documentary project of place. But it goes much further in positing a breadth of questions regarding the role of the photographer and the relationships held between practising photographers. Especially considering those making projects about the ‘same’ place or subject, it has to be noted that this book also defines the distinctions between how crucial the position of the photographer is, how our subjectivities are central to what we see, and the varieties of experience we bring to each enquiry or investigation.  

N.B. As ever, this is a subjective review of a piece of work I am considering through my lens as a photographer and curator as well as reader/viewer.