PGZ2018 | The second edition of Photograd's zine

Introducing the second edition of Photograd's zine, PGZ2018 | Celebrating those photographers who are graduating university this year from UK based courses. Available to purchase in the Photograd online shop, PGZ2018 praises brand new photographic talent.

This year we are promoting 2018 photography graduates from UK based courses in various ways; interviews, sharing of work, and aiming to reach a much wider audience. With support from Spectrum Photographic on this particular project we have been able to showcase new graduates through the second edition of PGZ. Here we introduce you to PGZ2018.

This summer we received entries from new photography graduates and we're celebrating this talent through the second edition of PGZ. PGZ2018 showcases work from 11 photographers from various universities across the UK including University of the Arts London, University of Salford, and The University of the West of England.

From calling for work, receiving more submissions than ever before, to the final judging process with the help of Hazel Watts of Spectrum Photographic, we have been presented with a much wider variety of photography that's new to the scene this year. We're starting to notice trends in research, subject matter, and outcome, and we're excited to bring you an array of this to you through PGZ2018.

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Natalie Paetzold and the series  Finding the Void

Natalie Paetzold and the series Finding the Void

Jay Goodsell and the series  Portus Dubris

Jay Goodsell and the series Portus Dubris

University of the Arts London graduate Joanna Wierzbicka presents her series The Point Where We Meet which we've also featured as the cover image.

"The point where we meet is a surface forming a common line between two bodies, spaces, layers. Fashion becomes the translation of persona, appears as a boundary between us and others, almost like a mask or a second skin. It makes us feel comfortable and confident, allows to create the image of the self and coincide with others.
Garments perform the function of masking and wrapping - they deform and deconstruct the human form, but also in some cases fail and reveal the natural shape of the body, its pure, naked form. They conceal and reveal at the same time, causing the coexistence between absence and presence allowing surfaces to meet.
Within this series, there are also elements of an embodiment, disembodiment, and the awareness of bodily sensations achieved through the tactility of clothing."

Images from the series  The Point Where We Meet  by Joanna Wierzbicka

Images from the series The Point Where We Meet by Joanna Wierzbicka

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MFA Photography graduate from the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, Natalie Paetzold introduces us to Finding the Void.

"Finding the Void is rooted in the desire to free one‘s head from one’s thoughts through the rhythm of walking within a nature setting. Placing one step in front of another helps to clear one‘s mind due to the ongoing act of repetition. The body of work is an investigation into meditation and landscape. Through the use of digitally reconstructed photography the work explores an immersion into both land and seascapes, creating a conscious state of being. Both surroundings allow contemplation through different visual experiences; being an active practitioner or being an observer. The ambiguous spheres create an awareness of the indexical nature of the photograph and blend the past, present and future together. Through walking, wandering, thinking and looking these strikingly coloured images reflect on ideas of phenomenology and perception, whilst also considering the possibilities of parallel worlds."

 
Image from the series  Finding the Void  by Natalie Paetzold

Image from the series Finding the Void by Natalie Paetzold

 

University of East London graduate Jay Goodsell presents his series Portus Dubris.

"Portus Dubris which derives from the towns roman beginnings, is a body of work that explores Dovers landscapes, not only is it undergoing major structural changes, the town still hangs within the unknown when the UK leaves the European Union. It’s often a forgotton place, and recently receiving a lot of negative press. The small but vital town to the country was voted at number one as the ‘worst place to live within the UK’. Dover is the entry point for many visiting guests from the continent, which left the question, what is so bad about the town to be voted number one?"

Images from the series  Portus Dubris  by Jay Goodsell

Images from the series Portus Dubris by Jay Goodsell

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PGZ2018 is available to buy here in the Photograd Shop.

The second edition of PGZ - open to submissions!

Calling 2018 photography graduates. This one's open to you!


We're looking for 11 photography graduates from UK university courses to be part of the second edition of our zine, PGZ, which will launch Summer 2018.

To submit, email a series of work, 100 word description, university, and website to photograd2018@gmail.com only with the subject 'ZINE'.
Submission deadline: 11th July. Open to 2018 photography graduates from UK courses only.

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A big thank you goes to Spectrum for helping us to bring the second edition of PGZ to life.

Introducing Spectrum Photographic Graduate Discount!

 

 

The wonderful team at Spectrum Photographic are now giving 20% graduate discount 🎉

Up until the end of the year that students graduate, 20% discount is applied, and for the year following, 10% discount is applied. All you need to do is sign up via Spectrum's Student Page, or head over to their website for more info.

A must for all soon to be graduates!

Silas Dominey - Superstition Winner

University: Brighton University, MA Photography

Websitewww.silasdominey.com

Artist Statement:

On the grounds of Bolton Priory there is a place called The Strid where the full breadth of the River Wharf is turned sideways through an unmapped tangle of underwater caverns.

While beautiful, it has a macabre history. At the narrowest point the river appears just wide enough to cross at a leap. Many who have tried slip and fall to their deaths. Years of erosion have channelled out an underwater tomb below. The bodies of the drowned rarely surface.

These photos are about this place and the unique qualities that make it so dangerous and alluring.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

The Striding Place: The initial brief for the series came from our Experimental Practice module. I grew up near the river Wharfe so the Strid was just something I’d always known about, but I didn’t realise the amount of history surrounding it until I started looking into it. The title is taken from a short horror story by Gertrude Atherton.

While making the work I was looking at British landscape photography like The River Winter by Jem Southam, but I think I was also influenced by more impressionistic stuff like Rinko Kawauchi. I shot the series on a few different cameras, some 120 film, some digital, and the studio work was done on a digital Hasselblad.

 
Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

 

University experience and MA at Brighton University: I did my BA at Leeds College of Art, which was a great experience. I was a little older than most when I started, so I think I was able to appreciate what a good environment it was to be in. After that I worked as an in-house photographer for a creative agency in Leeds, which was wonderful training for the technical side of things and the process of making images on a daily basis. I chose to study an MA because I felt like I’d let the critical thinking part of my brain lapse a bit. Brighton just seemed like a good place to be with the amount of photo related activity that goes on here, and the tutors and technical staff have been fantastic.

 
Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

 

Your work in general: I don’t think I could pin down my work very precisely at the moment. As an in-house photographer at an agency you’re often required to be a bit of a chameleon and adopt different styles for each job. The Striding Place was very experimental, and completely out of character for me, so right now I’m just trying to find a direction for my final project. 

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Untitled, 2016. The Striding Place.

Superstition submission: I’d seen the Superstition competition on Twitter a few times before I realised I had a fitting body of work pretty much ready to go. It’s been a nice surprise, and quite hectic dealing with interview questions, etc. Winning something like this really forces you to have something to say about your work, I think often photography students have more trouble talking about their work than anything. I’m really happy to have won some prints from Spectrum, which will be a huge help with putting my final show together. My only advice for entering competitions is to be a bit savvy about the terms and conditions. Make sure you know what you’re getting in to, as there are a lot of disreputable rights-grabbing photo contests out there.

Superstition: Call For Entries

Alongside Spectrum and Photoworks, we are currently seeking entries from recent graduates or current students for work exploring the theme 'Superstition'. The theme can include ideas around mythology and story telling in photography. 

How to enter:

  • Submissions via photogradsub@gmail.com
  • Submit 4-8 jpegs - maximum 2200 pixels on the longest size @72dpi (dots per inch)
  • Include image titles, title of body of work, date and a project statement (up to 250 words) in the submission email
  • Include full contact details and website link (if applicable)

Prize:

Deadline:

  • 5pm (GMT) on Tuesday 28th February 2017

Judges:

Terms & Conditions:

  • To be eligible, students need to be graduating from a BA or MA course this academic year or have graduated within a year of the submission date
  • We accept submissions from any visual course with a photographic core
  • The winning image(s) will be shared via Photograd's, Photoworks' and Spectrum's social media platforms and on any promotional media
  • Copyright remains with the artist
  • The winner will be announced on Friday 17th March 2017