Loupe & The Brick Lane Gallery - Another Graduate Show

 
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Ioanna Sakellaraki
A selection from the series Turtles

In an effort to let go of the human obsession for order and rhythm, I led myself adrift in the big wide world. Being away, lost in the strangeness of the unfamiliar, I constantly looked for home but never returned to it. It is said that tortoises crawl about on red earth, going nowhere in plenty of time. They carry their own home with them forever. The power of recalling and rebuilding memory from the nonexistent. Where there is no place to go and nothing to become; the being-ness of human freedom.

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http://ioannasakellaraki.com/
@ioannasakellaraki_photography


Laura van Erp
Single Image (Diptych)

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@pauravanerp


Alex Currie
Single Image

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Anna Perger
Single Image

I do not follow predefined concepts, even though it may be appealing. When I take a photograph, I have to place trust in my own creativity and ideas. In that moment I am a hopeful wanderer locating the already existing image. By exposing myself, the model and I share our vulnerability, which establishes trust and reciprocity. This is the core of my work. The animal inside everyone appeals most to me. I wander together with the person in front of me, unravelling the wilderness in the both of us.

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Fiona Filipidis
Series – Velvet

I didn’t know how deep I had gone until I came up for air. I fell head over heels and rolled and tumbled and scraped my knees and bruised my elbows, rolled, rolled and rolled around some more until I was stopped by water and couldn’t roll any more. He branded my soul, weakened my walls and seized it all. It ended; an awakening. Velvet is a cathartic journey I embarked on as a way of coming to terms with the end of my first, overwhelming, tumultuous relationship.

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Liam Webb
Series – Mother, Mother…

Mother, Mother… is the retracing and reconstruction of Dyfed-Powys Police 1983 operation 'Seal Bay'. 'Seal Bay' is the true story of the most complex drug smuggling conspiracy seen in Britain. Building a cavern out of fibreglass under an inaccessible cove in North Pembrokeshire the smugglers hoped to move cannabis into the UK. Head of the ring was Danish film star Soeren Berg-Arnback. Mother, Mother incorporates and references cinematic lighting and forensic photography. Mother, Mother... presents itself as a crime story through a complex mix of photographs, and objects forcing the viewer to navigate moments ranging from the vapid to the substantial, and to decipher clues as if at a real crime scene.

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www.liamwebb.co.uk
@liam.p.webb


Megan Winstone
Single Image

Portrait of Gina Tonic, Welsh body activist and writer, eating chips in our local fish bar in Abercynon, Rhondda Cynon Taf, South Wales. South Wales is historically absent from a female voice with its strong male presence of mining communities, all male voice choirs and rugby tribes. Gina and I are from similar areas of the South Wales Valleys and wanted to give a realistic look about its communities and characters. Working with a team of Welsh and Wales based creatives, Lily of the Valley shows the true values of life in the Valleys.

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Josh Adam Jones
Series – XO

Josh set out to unearth and communicate stories about the expatriate communities of Muscat in Oman. XO concentrates on the relationship between local people and outsiders. With over forty-five percent of the population falling into the expatriate category, Muscat plays host to a rich, diverse and colourful culture. The hospitality and generosity shown by the people of Oman was overwhelming. This project was partly a response to Western misconceptions of the East, and misrepresentations of Oriental values and beliefs. Oman is a peaceful and prosperous country; a sanctuary from the conflicts that affect that part of the world.

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www.joshadamjones.co.uk
@joshadamjonesphoto


Jamie Murray 
Series – Folly

‘How do you get the butterfly, starts from there, that’s the transformation. Bottom line is how a man can change.’ Mikey, 2018 This work came about through a series of conversations with individuals who have been incarcerated. Within these conversations the ex-prisoners spoke of what led them to punishment, how they navigated the prison environment, and their eventual transition from institution to freedom. I wanted to hear the stories told by those who had experienced prison firsthand, an approach more akin to a folklorist. The works are a rumination on these private conversations.

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Joe Pettet-Smith
Series – Anarchy Tamed

Gravel roads paved by hand carve through the desert, sheets of rusted metal welded together days before the event make up the City Gates, crowds drift through the dust dressed in haphazard combinations of leather, weathered sportswear and pseudo-military uniforms. This is Wasteland Weekend, the world’s biggest post-apocalyptic festival. The now permanent festival site sits in between the defunct Nevada Nuclear Test Site – where from 1951 a total of 928 nuclear warheads were tested during the cold war – and Hollywood. This is a place where costumes are mandatory, of warring tribes, Thunderdome battles and Mad Max vehicle parades. What started out as a few dozen fans of the films getting together in the desert is now 4,000 enthusiasts from around the world drawn to the promise of chaos and freedom.

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Rebecca Booth
A selection from the Series – In Case of Emergency

In Case of Emergency invites you to question the treatment of women within Westernized society. Depicting sexual assault, the intention of the project is to bring to light the detrimental effects of objectifying women. Social psychology concluded that sexualization (objectification) affects the way we perceive other people, in that it strips them of certain human attributes, such as a moral sense or the capacity to responsibly plan ones actions (Cogoni, Carnaghi, Silani, 2018). Therefore, it is not surprising to learn an estimated 3.4 Million women in the UK have experienced sexual assault over the age of 16 (Office for National Statistics, 2017). The items shown are targeted at women as a ‘super-cute’ way to defend themselves against assailants. A sickly sweet saviour. The hyper feminization of the products exposes the deep rooted ideology of womanhood in Westernized society.

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www.rebeccaboothphoto.com
@rebeccaboothphoto

An interview with female photography group, Uprooted

UPROOTED features six female artists from different cultural backgrounds working with a distinctly diverse approach: photography, installation pieces and works on paper. The unexpected fusion of each artist’s practice leads to a metaphorical understanding of the concept uprooted. The exhibition celebrated the not-yet possibilities when something or someone is rooted out from its familiar locations.

Private view: 29th May 2019, 6-9pm

Dates: 30 May - 2 June, 12-6pm

Location: Arts Hub Gallery. 509 Creekside, Deptford, London SE8 4SA


Tell us about Uprooted.an.exhibition. Who does the group show consist of and have you all studied photography? We are an evolving group of six female artists from different cultural backgrounds, where photography is at the core of what we do. The Uprooted exhibition will consist of a diverse approach including, photography, installation pieces and works on paper. We all studied MA Photography at University of the Arts London in 17/18. 

Image by  Clare Hoddinott

Who or what motivates members to continue making new work?  Our practice is research driven, so this sparks ideas and experimentation. We support one another to activate momentum to try things out and create a safe space to celebrate our achievements and our failures. 

How did Uprooted.an.exhibition come to the surface? What were the initial ideas and inspirations? We wanted to create a group of women to support one another in the next phase of our artistic journeys post studying a Masters. We wanted our work to be seen beyond the UAL network, to create and curate something that we had full control over and to try things we weren't able to do within an educational institution. We were inspired by the common threads running through our works and wanted to build a show around the unexpected fusion of each other’s practice which leads to the metaphorical understanding of the concept uprooted

What is the group’s biggest achievement to date? This is our first exhibition together. Watch this space… 

Individually, we are busy exhibiting elsewhere including, Photo London, Arles in France, Thomassen Gallery in Sweden and The Biscuit Factory in Newcastle. 

Image by  Nazanin Raissi

What's the main goal for Uprooted.an.exhibition? The exhibition celebrates the not-yet possibilities when something or someone is rooted out from it’s familiar location. We hope that each person that comes to the show will find something that resonates with them when thinking about the concept behind uprooted

Image by  Laura Blight

Image by Laura Blight

How can photographers get involved in what you do?  Anyone is welcome to come along to the private view on 29th May between 6.00-9.00pm and the exhibition will remain open till the 2nd June, so do come along and say hi. The majority of the artists should be around most days too. Otherwise you can e-mail us info.uprooted@gmail.com or follow us on Instagram @uprooted.an.exhibition to get in touch. 

Image by SandraF

Image by SandraF

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Perseverance. Things can take time. Our show has been 6 months in the making due to a few hiccups and hurdles, particularly in finding a suitable, affordable and available space in London. 

What does the future have in store for the group? We want to progress and expand our individual practices, collaborate with other artists and engage with the local community in practical ways.

Pre-order Photograd's next Brexit themed zine

This Brexit edition of PGZ supports a number of photography graduates who studied in the UK. These photographers have been given the opportunity to showcase work made around the theme of Brexit under the current climate in the UK. Select photographers have been interviewed by professionals within the industry for this zine.

With a wide array of subject matter, this publication brings to the forefront current situations and opinions across the UK amidst our controversial decision to leave the European Union. Both positive and negative stories presented here give readers the opportunity to consider and reflect, make changes and move forward.

Photograd has plans to release a second volume of this Brexit zine later in 2019 with a possible printed edition to follow.


Pre-order customers will be signed up to receive the Photograd newsletter and will be sent a link to download this zine when it’s released.

Use the code 85AK39N for 10% off any pre-orders.


Here are a few images and spreads from the zine to get a taste of things to come.

Image by  Bridie Lewis  who has been interviewed by  Joanne Coates  for this zine

Image by Bridie Lewis who has been interviewed by Joanne Coates for this zine

Image by  Kat Dlugosz  who has been interviewed by  Hanna-Katrina Jedrosz  for this zine  "Now I feel Scottish... my life is here, my home, my business, my partner and almost all my friends. My son was born here and feels Scottish. All of his life was here. Brexit could potentially rob me of everything I have built in 20 years, when I came I was young, now I am not. Starting again somewhere, and alone, frightens me. I have half-heartedly looked at going elsewhere but it looks difficult."  Uta, 47, from Germany, 20 years in Scotland, with her son Daniel, 18, born in Scotland

Image by Kat Dlugosz who has been interviewed by Hanna-Katrina Jedrosz for this zine

"Now I feel Scottish... my life is here, my home, my business, my partner and almost all my friends. My son was born here and feels Scottish. All of his life was here. Brexit could potentially rob me of everything I have built in 20 years, when I came I was young, now I am not. Starting again somewhere, and alone, frightens me. I have half-heartedly looked at going elsewhere but it looks difficult."

Uta, 47, from Germany, 20 years in Scotland, with her son Daniel, 18, born in Scotland

Spread by  Jakub Junek  who was selected by  Brendan Barry  for this zine

Spread by Jakub Junek who was selected by Brendan Barry for this zine

Spread by  Matt MacPake  who was selected by Photograd for this zine

Spread by Matt MacPake who was selected by Photograd for this zine

 
Image by  Luke Archer  who was selected by  Tom Coleman  for this zine

Image by Luke Archer who was selected by Tom Coleman for this zine

Image by  Deividas Buivydas  who was selected by  Chloe Juno  for this zine

Image by Deividas Buivydas who was selected by Chloe Juno for this zine

Spread by  Lorenza Demata  who has been interviewed by  Tom Coleman  for this zine

Spread by Lorenza Demata who has been interviewed by Tom Coleman for this zine

NEXT EDITION OF PHOTO SCRATCH - APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

Wednesday 12th June 2019, 6-9pm, RPS House, Bristol

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We welcome applications from working documentary photographers and photojournalists. The only criteria for showing work is that it is documentary in nature, and that you are a professional photographer, not currently in full time education, working in the pictures based industries. 

Applications should be made via this online form.

You will be asked to include in your application:

  • A brief description of your project (no more than 200 words)

  • What you hope to gain from doing Photo Scratch – are there particular issues or questions you are encountering to do with your project?

  • A selection of low res jpegs from the proposed project (no more than 5 pictures, no more than 800kb each in file size)

  • Any information you have about how you would want to display the work (prints, contact sheets, projection, etc.)

  • Two links to where your work has been published or shared other than your own website. This should not be the work you are applying with.


Application time line:

  • Deadline: 5pm Wednesday 22nd May 2019

  • Notification of participation - by Monday 27th May 2019

  • Photo Scratch event - Wednesday 12th June 2019 at The Royal Photographic Society, Bristol 


Please note:

  • Photo Scratch is for work-in-progress only.

  • Photo Scratch is predominantly focused on documentary photography and photojournalism, though projects that reach into the art side of things are also welcome if they are rooted in documentary. Challenging the form is always encouraged.

  • There is no fee to apply or participate, but you are responsible for your own costs associated with participating (transport, prints etc.)

  • Photo Scratch is specifically for photographers who are not currently studying.


Supported by The RPS Documentary Group

Introducing Darkroom

darkroom is a fantastic new facility in Camden Town in north London where you can work comfortably to produce high quality photographic prints.

 
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With a range of enlargers that will satisfy most photographers’ needs, ranging from easy to use Kaiser 35mm/120 enlargers to a range of De Vere and LPLs capable of handling everything from 35mm to 5 x 4.

Initially, you will need to attend a short Induction session with an experienced technician, to ensure you understand how all the equipment works and what standard operating practices are.

Once inducted, as a member you can book an enlarger for a session of independent printing. darkroom provides all essential chemicals (developer, stop, fix, etc.), so all you need to bring is your own paper. darkroom even provides a processing service for films received at least 48 hours in advance.

No previous darkroom experience? Don't worry, darkroom offers workshops to get you started, or if you've mastered the basics there will be more advanced courses too. Head over to Courses and Workshops to find out more and book your first workshop.


Here we have an interview with one of darkroom’s directors, Phil Grey.

Run by a small group of photographers and enthusiasts, based in Camden Town, this fully equipped darkroom offers a co-working space to artists and photographers working with film based photography, as well teaching those keen to learn. The space offers membership, introductory and intermediate workshops, and aims to sustain a film based photographic community. 

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So, starting from the beginning, what motivated you to start darkroom? Well, we’re all film-based photography enthusiasts and felt that there was a need for a co-working space that supports other film-based photographers. Sadly, a lot of darkrooms are closing down, so we inherited a lot of our equipment as we couldn’t bear to see it all thrown away. A number of photographers have also very generously donated equipment they no longer use. 

We’re really keen to support the revival of interest in film based processes that has arisen over the last few years. As well as our membership, and co-working facilities, we offer workshops enabling darkroom access to people who may never have experienced the magic of one before. 

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Why do you think analogue photography is still so relevant today? I think younger photographers, who have always worked digitally, appreciate working away from screens, and slowing down their photographic process. I think there’s an increasing number of creatives who enjoy the discipline of working with film, and the therapeutic experience of spending time in a darkroom. There are also older photographers who are welcoming the opportunity to get back into the darkroom, and have that experience they had when they were younger. Few people nowadays have the equipment (or space to house it), to enable them to have a darkroom at home. 

The  darkroom  team with Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery

The darkroom team with Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery

People who come in to use our space are constantly saying how enjoyable it is to slow down and spend time with a tactile process. They also love doing it in the company of others. It’s become a place to meet people, a place to share ideas, see other people’s work - some members are collaborating together on new projects.

Who is darkroom for? Everyone! Well, everyone who loves, or wants to learn more about, photography and film based processes. It’s for people who want to continue working with film, processing film, developing prints, learning about the processes. We run workshops for new comers and people who want to improve existing skills, as well as offering facilities for those who want to get on with their own work.

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How can those interested, get involved? You can find details of our membership offers and workshops on www.darkroomlondon.org or follow us on Instagram and Twitter. We offer a 20% discount for students and recent graduates!


darkroom membership details

As a user of darkroom you can choose the membership that suits you best. Members are at the heart of the darkroom community. We have different membership schemes to meet different needs, as well as our new gift memberships for your analogue enthused loved ones. 

Resin Coated £60 - Our entry level membership for occasional users. This membership enables you to book your darkroom sessions.

Silver Bromide £250 - For those of you who imagine developing your relationship with us. In addition to your induction, you get four free long or seven short sessions, plus 10% discount on workshops and darkroom sessions.

Platinum £500 - For the safe light junkie. Free induction and one free long session per month, plus 10% discount on workshops, darkroom sessions and bookings at our partner studio 2 Iliffe Yard.

Our friends at Process Supplies are offering all darkroom members an additional 5% discount on their already very competitive prices.

Once you buy annual membership and have taken our mandatory Induction (£20 for Resin Coated members) you can use our online booking to reserve darkroom sessions.

Session Prices

Weekday Long Sessions  £45

Weekday Short Sessions  £30

Weekend Long Sessions  £55

Weekend Short Sessions  £35 

Bulk buy sessions in advance and get one free. Six-pack Weekday £225. Six-pack Weekend £285

Exclusive weekday darkroom use once a month from £80.

One-to-one guided sessions with an experienced tutor from £150

Student Discount: We offer a 20% discount to students on Memberships, and 10% on Workshops and Access Sessions.

 
 

The South West Collective of Photography - A Crowdfunding Campaign

The South West Collective of Photography are hosting their very first photography exhibition along Torquay high street in May. They will be taking over an empty unit and turning it into a public gallery. The theme is “Visual Storytelling”.

It’s with regret that due to various setbacks, the collective have had to start a crowd funder in relation to the accessibility and running of this event. This is to make sure it can be open to the public and operate effectively.

The South West Collective of Photography must stress that arts and culture, particularly photography, are severely underrepresented in this part of the country. It is absolutely vital that we change this, but cannot do it without your help! 

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The Full Picture: The stories behind the photographs - A Kickstarter Campaign

A photo book where photographers choose one of their own images and reveal the story behind their chosen image - managed and curated by Tom Carpenter, founder of LeftaBit.


My name is Tom Carpenter and I curate a blog called LeftaBit. I have recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for a project called The Full Picture. The idea for The Full Picture came about when listening a photographer speak at an event in London in 2015. This particular photographer told such incredible stories, not necessarily about the image itself, but instead she told the backstories to how the images came about.

After that event I was intrigued to find out if other photographers had similar stories behind their photographs. As the stories came through from the photographers, some of the stories made me laugh others made me question how they had made it to the point of getting the image at all. One thing that stood out to me with the stories was that a lot of the photographers had had to come through some sort of adversity and at times fear or crippling self doubt to capture that final image.  

This is something that really resonated with me, because I think we’ve all been in a position where you are in a unfamiliar place with a camera in your hands and you are having an internal battle, what am I doing here, why do I need to get this photo and who else actually cares. We compound these thoughts afterwards by going onto social media and spending hours looking at other people’s so called perfect lives or perfect photographs, and in turn piling more and more pressure onto ourselves.

The Full Picture for me highlighted in a way that the photographers I admire most also have those days where nothing seems to go as planned, where they are in a situation where fear of self doubt has them questioning what they do. This project highlights that in a small way, but it also shows that with perseverance and hard work you can get that one shot that makes it all worth while.

You can still pledge towards The Full Picture up until Thursday 4th April by clicking here.

2020 Collective Present: Environ 

Private View ·  Thu 21 March · 6 - 9pm ·  Copeland Gallery ·  SE15 3SN
Exhibition continues · Fri 22 March · 11 - 4 


2020 is a collective of photographers who create work internationally, collaborating on projects from their studio base in South East London.

For the first time, they will exhibit work together at Copeland Gallery, Peckham. Highlighting the work of twenty members, Environ will exhibit personal projects exploring the human condition within domestic, natural and imagined environments.

Tami Aftab  ·  Joe Beeching  ·  Lily Boyle   ·  Byron Chambers  ·  Tom Coleman  ·  Nathan Keir Crofton-Bond  ·  Oliver Dawson  ·  Maite de Orbe  ·  Rachel Gordon  ·  James Greenhalgh  ·  Matilda Hallander  ·  Unai Mateo Lopez  ·  Frederik Marks  ·   Dina Patey   ·  Prim Patnasiri   ·  Phoebe Somerfield  ·  Peter Stewart-Sykes  ·  India Tuersley  ·  Andrea Urbez  ·  Coco Wu 

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Click here to book your space.

SEMIMAGAZINE Issue 1 * ALPHA *

Semi Magazine is a non-profit, independently published online and annual print magazine championing new voices within the global art community. Work featured in Semi Magazine often comments, acknowledges and questions current and past sociology. We feature artwork deemed topical or important in some way or work which has openly been worked on with passion and vigour. Semi Magazine was established in late 2017 and is funded entirely by its own revenue and, lovingly, by its founders.

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Semi Magazine Issue 1 * ALPHA *  consists of 160 pages of artistic narrative and exploration on a few important topics within sociology and global society. In this issue we explore intuition, anticipation, commodity, tradition, imperfection, skaters, women and politics influencing sociology.

Featuring the work of Alyssa Fujita Karoui, Arthur Fechoz, China Hopson, Ioanna Sakellaraki, Laura Dow, Sophie Barbasch, Tilyen Mucik, Jeroen De Wandel and Marie Smith.

The A5-ish sized magazine is printed on 100gsm Archival Matte Art Paper and Perfect Bound. The Magazine is costs €17.99 but currently is on sale at €15.00 (without shipping) to celebrate our first ever celebration. Our first print run is small at 50 copies so sales are limited.

Alyssa Fujita Karoui  Minor Revelations  Spread

Alyssa Fujita Karoui Minor Revelations Spread

Sophie Barbasch  Military Logic  Spread

Sophie Barbasch Military Logic Spread

Arthur Fechoz  Horizon

Arthur Fechoz Horizon

COALVILLE PHOTOGRAPHS SELECTED FOR INTERNATIONAL ARTS BIENNIAL

Coalville photographer Christopher Mear has been selected to take part in the UK Young Artist City Takeover in Nottingham (7 – 13 February). Chris has been photographing the town and it’s people for ten years and is delighted to have been selected for one of the largest biennials of national and international artists in the world UKYA City Takeover comes to Nottingham, 7 - 13 February 2019; uniting 250 artists from 25 countries. It will span the city, immersing visitors in an array of extraordinary, innovative and contemporary work, from visual arts to performance; music; applied arts; literature; digital arts and moving image. Expect to encounter art and performance in cultural spaces as well as unusual places. From caves to cafes; markets to museums; studios to the streets - the City Takeover weaves a rich tapestry of venues across Nottingham.

Born, raised and currently living in Leicestershire, Christopher Mear has been making photographs over the last decade about the industrial history of the English landscape and its people, exploring its past and present. Mear uses his photography as a way to understand the social, economic and physical impact that the time of de-industrialisation, which coincided with his own lifetime, has had.

In 2014 Mear began to work with a local photographer he had discovered online; this meeting of artists eventually led to a collaborative project, Mear losing then recovering his photographic mojo and, ultimately, a series of videos and wonderful “shared” photobook produced by Mear. This interesting and unusual take reminds us all of the importance of collaboration and working together with other artists — without competition, not a race to the top, but shared progress, failures and successes.

Christopher will be exhibiting his photographs, books and short films in Sneinton Market during the week long city takeover.

From the series  Coalville Photographed

From the series Coalville Photographed

Join Photo Scratch on Monday 18th February 2019 for their next edition

Click here to book your FREE ticket.

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A night for new ideas, Photo Scratch is an opportunity for documentary photographers to understand how their work is perceived and gain valuable insight into how to take their work further with the benefit of other people’s outside eye. For spectators this is an opportunity to preview projects, offer feedback, and engage in conversations about photography.

The format of the night involves a group of six to eight photographers previewing a project in an incomplete state. These photographers are selected in advance based on informal applications. Each photographer is given a wall space to display their work in any way they see fit (rough prints, contact sheets, annotations, captions, text, projection etc.). The audience, comprised of other photographers, friends, people within the industry and anyone with an interest in documentary photography, are then welcome to discuss the work and leave written feedback for each project. This valuable written feedback is then kept by each photographer for future reference. The night is free for all to attend, but booking is required. There is a bar in the gallery.

Our first edition of 2019 will feature work-in-progress from:
Rita Alvarez www.tudelaphotography.com

Tee Byford www.tearlach.co.uk

Julie Meresse www.juliemeresse.com

Hassan Nezamian www.hassannezamian.com

Marie Smith www.marieesmith.com

Alexandra Waespi www.alexandrawaespi.com

Introducing Peak Imaging - film processing, digital printing, photobooks, and more.

 
 
 

Peak Imaging is an independent photographic laboratory and print company based in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. Vastly experienced in both traditional film and the digital arena, their dedicated workforce has an amazing, average service time of 22 years.

Working alongside some very famous household names across the UK and Europe and more recently the Far East, producing wall art products and prints for museums, boardrooms, homes and photographers in general, Peak Imaging’s reputation is well documented and long established. 

Co-director Cathrine Lee has seen the company adapt and re-shape to the ever changing marketplace. “Customer service and product involvement is key to our success and we firmly believe that time invested in project development and consultation is vital for end result satisfaction. Our clients usually know what they want to achieve but often, not how to achieve it or more commonly, what is possible. From straight reprints of digital media or film to large format displays on PVC and acrylic, we cover a vast array of display products and services, working to strict guidelines and tolerances”.

Processing film through C41, E6 and Black and White lines all day, 5 days a week, all machinery is the best dip and dunk technology for a scratch-free environment. Slide mounting and film scanning still play a big part in photographic projects whilst the emailing of images from film is becoming very popular too.

Cathrine continues “As a laboratory of some 43 years in the business, we have always invested heavily in new machinery and ideas and currently employ both photographic and giclee printing techniques. We find that both have a place in domestic and commercial display forums and that it is sometimes wise to allow the subject matter of a piece to dictate the media and print format. Metallic and high gloss papers are very popular at the moment but much of the traditional photographic work pieces still demand rag papers and fine art materials”.

Photobooks are currently a favourite format for family enjoyment and advertising and Peak Imaging’s LifeBook product comes in many shapes and sizes to suit the project in hand. From weddings and world trips to coffee table promotions and antique collections. All stories can be told and cherished in the pages of a “LifeBook”.  Explore the possibilities and creation software at peak-imaging.com.

10,000 sq. ft. of production space has been carefully designed to create efficient workflow whilst housing darkrooms, conference facilities and design studios.  All of this and full product display can be visited at the Holbrook Avenue site.


Find out more about Peak Imaging and what they do here. You can even give them a follow on Facebook or Twitter.

Introducing Fable & Folk

There seems to be a running theme in our recent blog posts here at Photograd as we introduce you to some other online communities and networks.
In this blog post we introduce you to Fable & Folk, an independent platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire.

We think Charlotte’s answers are really inspiring so we hope you enjoy a read through them.

If you have something to share or talk about on the blog, get in touch!

Kate Walker,  A Day Away From the Farm , 2018

Kate Walker, A Day Away From the Farm, 2018

Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Charlotte and I’m a recent photography graduate. I wouldn’t say I have a motto, but one of my favourite quotes is “comparison is the thief of joy”. I think this applies so much within the photographic community - I spent years looking at other people’s work and thinking it was so much better than my own. Once I learnt to value my own work and not compare myself to others, I produced my best photography to date.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I was born in Manchester but grew up in a small village in North Lincolnshire. I started studying photography at A Level then moved to Cheltenham to study Editorial & Advertising Photography at The University of Gloucestershire. I graduated in November and recently got a job as a Content Creation Manager at an independent company specialising in homeware and DIY products. I plan on travelling in a couple of years time and would like to start my own photobook business in the future.

Charlotte Colenutt,  Soul Mate , 2018

Charlotte Colenutt, Soul Mate, 2018

What's your favourite style of photography? I wouldn’t say I have a favourite genre of photography, I love and appreciate photographs that tell a story or photographs that have thought and craftsmanship behind them. My specialisation, however, is documentary photography because I love to talk to people. I love to dedicate time to speaking to someone, finding out their story and trying to capture that. Moreover, I love finding out the story behind an interesting place and trying to document every inch of it to best tell it’s story to others.

Who or what motivates you? I have been passionate about photography for years now. I guess what motivates me to photograph is I feel a need to tell people’s stories and share them. I feel motivated by what’s going on in the world and by finding stories I haven’t seen/heard told before. I also surround myself with other photography - photobooks, magazines, social media accounts, organisations and blogs - to inspire me and keep me constantly thinking of new ideas.

Can you tell us what Fable & Folk is? Fable & Folk is an online platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire others. Directed at young or aspiring photographers, it’s a space I curate and share narratives and photo-stories. I want to develop Fable & Folk into more than just a blog sharing others work but an online hub - full of information from fellow budding photographers and the professionals whilst keeping my audience updated with current affairs in the photographic world.

Gweniver Exton,  Spiritual Spaces , 2018

Gweniver Exton, Spiritual Spaces, 2018

Tell us about the team behind Fable & Folk. There isn’t really a team at Fable & Folk, it’s mostly just me. I tend to be involved in every step of the process from recruiting a photographer to feature to the end blog post and sharing that on social media. I don’t feel I would be 100% truthful though if I said I did everything. Sometimes, my partner Adam Elliott and a few great friends from university, particularly Megan Bendall, are a great assistance in helping me find new and exciting work. It’s difficult running the operation mostly on my own but I consider it my baby and even if I had a full team of amazing staff, I’d still want to be involved in everything.

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fable & Folk? Fable & Folk started when I was studying at university and couldn’t decide what I wanted to do for a career - all I knew was that I love photobooks. I love designing them, constructing them and collecting them. Eventually my tutor Grant Scott and I decided the best way for me to pursue a career in photobooks would be for me to start my own publishing company. To build an audience, you first need to create a blog that naturally attracts an audience that will eventually move from the blog, to your company. I can’t thank Grant and my university peers enough for their support of Fable & Folk and if you haven’t already, I recommend listing to Grant’s podcast series ‘A Photographic Life’.

Jordan Turnbull,  A Rock and a Hard Place , 2018

Jordan Turnbull, A Rock and a Hard Place, 2018

What is Fable & Folk's biggest achievement to date? I’ve never been one to keep track of numbers or views. I know it sounds cheesy but I would say my biggest achievement is having had the chance to be in contact with so many fantastic photographers and to have built a hub of Fable & Folk support on Twitter. I feel so proud of where Fable & Folk is, who our biggest supporters are and most importantly, the list of photographers I get to consider friends and mentors.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? We always love being contacted by photographers! If you’re interested in submitting to Fable & Folk, visit our ‘Contact’ page for more details. We don’t have specifics on what the series should necessarily be or look like, we only ask you send us a strong narrative. THAT’S IT. That’s not to say we accept all work but we always want to offer something - whether it’s a feature on the blog or advice on how to develop the work to eventually get it featured. We also love getting constructive criticism and positive feedback from our audience on F&F so please feel free to message us or drop us an email.

Adam Elliott,  For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal , 2018

Adam Elliott, For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal, 2018

Give one tip to new photography graduates. If I could give one tip to new photography graduates I would stress the importance of networking - whether it’s through social media or attending events, it’s vital to make contact with other photographers. Networking so much during my course has meant that since leaving university, and trying to grow Fable & Folk, I have had endless support and mentorship from so many different photographers and influencers within the community - special thanks to Iain Sarjeant for giving me heaps of advice when the blog first started and to Chloe Juno for motivating me and offering so much help. In addition, I think it’s even more helpful if you’re struggling mentally, feeling overwhelmed or lost, to talk to someone in the same boat so don’t be afraid to reach out!

What does 2019 have in store for Fable & Folk? I don’t want to give too much away but I’m hoping 2019 will be a game changer for Fable & Folk. I really want to get more interviews on the blog and I’d like to try and get a new feature on the site where I share exhibitions, events and workshops for people to attend. I’d also potentially like to rebrand - new website, new logo - so the brand evolves with the work and the audience. I hope we can really develop into a fully realised online platform featuring lots of different important yet inspirational content for budding photographers/ photography enthusiasts.