The South West Collective of Photography - A Crowdfunding Campaign

The South West Collective of Photography are hosting their very first photography exhibition along Torquay high street in May. They will be taking over an empty unit and turning it into a public gallery. The theme is “Visual Storytelling”.

It’s with regret that due to various setbacks, the collective have had to start a crowd funder in relation to the accessibility and running of this event. This is to make sure it can be open to the public and operate effectively.

The South West Collective of Photography must stress that arts and culture, particularly photography, are severely underrepresented in this part of the country. It is absolutely vital that we change this, but cannot do it without your help! 

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The Full Picture: The stories behind the photographs - A Kickstarter Campaign

A photo book where photographers choose one of their own images and reveal the story behind their chosen image - managed and curated by Tom Carpenter, founder of LeftaBit.


My name is Tom Carpenter and I curate a blog called LeftaBit. I have recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for a project called The Full Picture. The idea for The Full Picture came about when listening a photographer speak at an event in London in 2015. This particular photographer told such incredible stories, not necessarily about the image itself, but instead she told the backstories to how the images came about.

After that event I was intrigued to find out if other photographers had similar stories behind their photographs. As the stories came through from the photographers, some of the stories made me laugh others made me question how they had made it to the point of getting the image at all. One thing that stood out to me with the stories was that a lot of the photographers had had to come through some sort of adversity and at times fear or crippling self doubt to capture that final image.  

This is something that really resonated with me, because I think we’ve all been in a position where you are in a unfamiliar place with a camera in your hands and you are having an internal battle, what am I doing here, why do I need to get this photo and who else actually cares. We compound these thoughts afterwards by going onto social media and spending hours looking at other people’s so called perfect lives or perfect photographs, and in turn piling more and more pressure onto ourselves.

The Full Picture for me highlighted in a way that the photographers I admire most also have those days where nothing seems to go as planned, where they are in a situation where fear of self doubt has them questioning what they do. This project highlights that in a small way, but it also shows that with perseverance and hard work you can get that one shot that makes it all worth while.

You can still pledge towards The Full Picture up until Thursday 4th April by clicking here.

2020 Collective Present: Environ 

Private View ·  Thu 21 March · 6 - 9pm ·  Copeland Gallery ·  SE15 3SN
Exhibition continues · Fri 22 March · 11 - 4 


2020 is a collective of photographers who create work internationally, collaborating on projects from their studio base in South East London.

For the first time, they will exhibit work together at Copeland Gallery, Peckham. Highlighting the work of twenty members, Environ will exhibit personal projects exploring the human condition within domestic, natural and imagined environments.

Tami Aftab  ·  Joe Beeching  ·  Lily Boyle   ·  Byron Chambers  ·  Tom Coleman  ·  Nathan Keir Crofton-Bond  ·  Oliver Dawson  ·  Maite de Orbe  ·  Rachel Gordon  ·  James Greenhalgh  ·  Matilda Hallander  ·  Unai Mateo Lopez  ·  Frederik Marks  ·   Dina Patey   ·  Prim Patnasiri   ·  Phoebe Somerfield  ·  Peter Stewart-Sykes  ·  India Tuersley  ·  Andrea Urbez  ·  Coco Wu 

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Click here to book your space.

SEMIMAGAZINE Issue 1 * ALPHA *

Semi Magazine is a non-profit, independently published online and annual print magazine championing new voices within the global art community. Work featured in Semi Magazine often comments, acknowledges and questions current and past sociology. We feature artwork deemed topical or important in some way or work which has openly been worked on with passion and vigour. Semi Magazine was established in late 2017 and is funded entirely by its own revenue and, lovingly, by its founders.

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Cover images by Jeroen De Wandel (left) & Sophie Barbasch (right).

Semi Magazine Issue 1 * ALPHA *  consists of 160 pages of artistic narrative and exploration on a few important topics within sociology and global society. In this issue we explore intuition, anticipation, commodity, tradition, imperfection, skaters, women and politics influencing sociology.

Featuring the work of Alyssa Fujita Karoui, Arthur Fechoz, China Hopson, Ioanna Sakellaraki, Laura Dow, Sophie Barbasch, Tilyen Mucik, Jeroen De Wandel and Marie Smith.

The A5-ish sized magazine is printed on 100gsm Archival Matte Art Paper and Perfect Bound. The Magazine is costs €17.99 but currently is on sale at €15.00 (without shipping) to celebrate our first ever celebration. Our first print run is small at 50 copies so sales are limited.

Alyssa Fujita Karoui  Minor Revelations  Spread

Alyssa Fujita Karoui Minor Revelations Spread

Sophie Barbasch  Military Logic  Spread

Sophie Barbasch Military Logic Spread

Arthur Fechoz  Horizon

Arthur Fechoz Horizon

COALVILLE PHOTOGRAPHS SELECTED FOR INTERNATIONAL ARTS BIENNIAL

Coalville photographer Christopher Mear has been selected to take part in the UK Young Artist City Takeover in Nottingham (7 – 13 February). Chris has been photographing the town and it’s people for ten years and is delighted to have been selected for one of the largest biennials of national and international artists in the world UKYA City Takeover comes to Nottingham, 7 - 13 February 2019; uniting 250 artists from 25 countries. It will span the city, immersing visitors in an array of extraordinary, innovative and contemporary work, from visual arts to performance; music; applied arts; literature; digital arts and moving image. Expect to encounter art and performance in cultural spaces as well as unusual places. From caves to cafes; markets to museums; studios to the streets - the City Takeover weaves a rich tapestry of venues across Nottingham.

Born, raised and currently living in Leicestershire, Christopher Mear has been making photographs over the last decade about the industrial history of the English landscape and its people, exploring its past and present. Mear uses his photography as a way to understand the social, economic and physical impact that the time of de-industrialisation, which coincided with his own lifetime, has had.

In 2014 Mear began to work with a local photographer he had discovered online; this meeting of artists eventually led to a collaborative project, Mear losing then recovering his photographic mojo and, ultimately, a series of videos and wonderful “shared” photobook produced by Mear. This interesting and unusual take reminds us all of the importance of collaboration and working together with other artists — without competition, not a race to the top, but shared progress, failures and successes.

Christopher will be exhibiting his photographs, books and short films in Sneinton Market during the week long city takeover.

From the series  Coalville Photographed

From the series Coalville Photographed

Join Photo Scratch on Monday 18th February 2019 for their next edition

Click here to book your FREE ticket.

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A night for new ideas, Photo Scratch is an opportunity for documentary photographers to understand how their work is perceived and gain valuable insight into how to take their work further with the benefit of other people’s outside eye. For spectators this is an opportunity to preview projects, offer feedback, and engage in conversations about photography.

The format of the night involves a group of six to eight photographers previewing a project in an incomplete state. These photographers are selected in advance based on informal applications. Each photographer is given a wall space to display their work in any way they see fit (rough prints, contact sheets, annotations, captions, text, projection etc.). The audience, comprised of other photographers, friends, people within the industry and anyone with an interest in documentary photography, are then welcome to discuss the work and leave written feedback for each project. This valuable written feedback is then kept by each photographer for future reference. The night is free for all to attend, but booking is required. There is a bar in the gallery.

Our first edition of 2019 will feature work-in-progress from:
Rita Alvarez www.tudelaphotography.com

Tee Byford www.tearlach.co.uk

Julie Meresse www.juliemeresse.com

Hassan Nezamian www.hassannezamian.com

Marie Smith www.marieesmith.com

Alexandra Waespi www.alexandrawaespi.com

Introducing Peak Imaging - film processing, digital printing, photobooks, and more.

 
 
 

Peak Imaging is an independent photographic laboratory and print company based in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. Vastly experienced in both traditional film and the digital arena, their dedicated workforce has an amazing, average service time of 22 years.

Working alongside some very famous household names across the UK and Europe and more recently the Far East, producing wall art products and prints for museums, boardrooms, homes and photographers in general, Peak Imaging’s reputation is well documented and long established. 

Co-director Cathrine Lee has seen the company adapt and re-shape to the ever changing marketplace. “Customer service and product involvement is key to our success and we firmly believe that time invested in project development and consultation is vital for end result satisfaction. Our clients usually know what they want to achieve but often, not how to achieve it or more commonly, what is possible. From straight reprints of digital media or film to large format displays on PVC and acrylic, we cover a vast array of display products and services, working to strict guidelines and tolerances”.

Processing film through C41, E6 and Black and White lines all day, 5 days a week, all machinery is the best dip and dunk technology for a scratch-free environment. Slide mounting and film scanning still play a big part in photographic projects whilst the emailing of images from film is becoming very popular too.

Cathrine continues “As a laboratory of some 43 years in the business, we have always invested heavily in new machinery and ideas and currently employ both photographic and giclee printing techniques. We find that both have a place in domestic and commercial display forums and that it is sometimes wise to allow the subject matter of a piece to dictate the media and print format. Metallic and high gloss papers are very popular at the moment but much of the traditional photographic work pieces still demand rag papers and fine art materials”.

Photobooks are currently a favourite format for family enjoyment and advertising and Peak Imaging’s LifeBook product comes in many shapes and sizes to suit the project in hand. From weddings and world trips to coffee table promotions and antique collections. All stories can be told and cherished in the pages of a “LifeBook”.  Explore the possibilities and creation software at peak-imaging.com.

10,000 sq. ft. of production space has been carefully designed to create efficient workflow whilst housing darkrooms, conference facilities and design studios.  All of this and full product display can be visited at the Holbrook Avenue site.


Find out more about Peak Imaging and what they do here. You can even give them a follow on Facebook or Twitter.

Introducing Fable & Folk

There seems to be a running theme in our recent blog posts here at Photograd as we introduce you to some other online communities and networks.
In this blog post we introduce you to Fable & Folk, an independent platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire.

We think Charlotte’s answers are really inspiring so we hope you enjoy a read through them.

If you have something to share or talk about on the blog, get in touch!

Kate Walker,  A Day Away From the Farm , 2018

Kate Walker, A Day Away From the Farm, 2018

Who are you, what's your motto? My name is Charlotte and I’m a recent photography graduate. I wouldn’t say I have a motto, but one of my favourite quotes is “comparison is the thief of joy”. I think this applies so much within the photographic community - I spent years looking at other people’s work and thinking it was so much better than my own. Once I learnt to value my own work and not compare myself to others, I produced my best photography to date.

What’s your background? Have you studied photography? I was born in Manchester but grew up in a small village in North Lincolnshire. I started studying photography at A Level then moved to Cheltenham to study Editorial & Advertising Photography at The University of Gloucestershire. I graduated in November and recently got a job as a Content Creation Manager at an independent company specialising in homeware and DIY products. I plan on travelling in a couple of years time and would like to start my own photobook business in the future.

Charlotte Colenutt,  Soul Mate , 2018

Charlotte Colenutt, Soul Mate, 2018

What's your favourite style of photography? I wouldn’t say I have a favourite genre of photography, I love and appreciate photographs that tell a story or photographs that have thought and craftsmanship behind them. My specialisation, however, is documentary photography because I love to talk to people. I love to dedicate time to speaking to someone, finding out their story and trying to capture that. Moreover, I love finding out the story behind an interesting place and trying to document every inch of it to best tell it’s story to others.

Who or what motivates you? I have been passionate about photography for years now. I guess what motivates me to photograph is I feel a need to tell people’s stories and share them. I feel motivated by what’s going on in the world and by finding stories I haven’t seen/heard told before. I also surround myself with other photography - photobooks, magazines, social media accounts, organisations and blogs - to inspire me and keep me constantly thinking of new ideas.

Can you tell us what Fable & Folk is? Fable & Folk is an online platform created to embrace and share the tradition of visual storytelling to inform, educate and inspire others. Directed at young or aspiring photographers, it’s a space I curate and share narratives and photo-stories. I want to develop Fable & Folk into more than just a blog sharing others work but an online hub - full of information from fellow budding photographers and the professionals whilst keeping my audience updated with current affairs in the photographic world.

Gweniver Exton,  Spiritual Spaces , 2018

Gweniver Exton, Spiritual Spaces, 2018

Tell us about the team behind Fable & Folk. There isn’t really a team at Fable & Folk, it’s mostly just me. I tend to be involved in every step of the process from recruiting a photographer to feature to the end blog post and sharing that on social media. I don’t feel I would be 100% truthful though if I said I did everything. Sometimes, my partner Adam Elliott and a few great friends from university, particularly Megan Bendall, are a great assistance in helping me find new and exciting work. It’s difficult running the operation mostly on my own but I consider it my baby and even if I had a full team of amazing staff, I’d still want to be involved in everything.

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fable & Folk? Fable & Folk started when I was studying at university and couldn’t decide what I wanted to do for a career - all I knew was that I love photobooks. I love designing them, constructing them and collecting them. Eventually my tutor Grant Scott and I decided the best way for me to pursue a career in photobooks would be for me to start my own publishing company. To build an audience, you first need to create a blog that naturally attracts an audience that will eventually move from the blog, to your company. I can’t thank Grant and my university peers enough for their support of Fable & Folk and if you haven’t already, I recommend listing to Grant’s podcast series ‘A Photographic Life’.

Jordan Turnbull,  A Rock and a Hard Place , 2018

Jordan Turnbull, A Rock and a Hard Place, 2018

What is Fable & Folk's biggest achievement to date? I’ve never been one to keep track of numbers or views. I know it sounds cheesy but I would say my biggest achievement is having had the chance to be in contact with so many fantastic photographers and to have built a hub of Fable & Folk support on Twitter. I feel so proud of where Fable & Folk is, who our biggest supporters are and most importantly, the list of photographers I get to consider friends and mentors.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? We always love being contacted by photographers! If you’re interested in submitting to Fable & Folk, visit our ‘Contact’ page for more details. We don’t have specifics on what the series should necessarily be or look like, we only ask you send us a strong narrative. THAT’S IT. That’s not to say we accept all work but we always want to offer something - whether it’s a feature on the blog or advice on how to develop the work to eventually get it featured. We also love getting constructive criticism and positive feedback from our audience on F&F so please feel free to message us or drop us an email.

Adam Elliott,  For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal , 2018

Adam Elliott, For ours you see, was Welsh steam coal, 2018

Give one tip to new photography graduates. If I could give one tip to new photography graduates I would stress the importance of networking - whether it’s through social media or attending events, it’s vital to make contact with other photographers. Networking so much during my course has meant that since leaving university, and trying to grow Fable & Folk, I have had endless support and mentorship from so many different photographers and influencers within the community - special thanks to Iain Sarjeant for giving me heaps of advice when the blog first started and to Chloe Juno for motivating me and offering so much help. In addition, I think it’s even more helpful if you’re struggling mentally, feeling overwhelmed or lost, to talk to someone in the same boat so don’t be afraid to reach out!

What does 2019 have in store for Fable & Folk? I don’t want to give too much away but I’m hoping 2019 will be a game changer for Fable & Folk. I really want to get more interviews on the blog and I’d like to try and get a new feature on the site where I share exhibitions, events and workshops for people to attend. I’d also potentially like to rebrand - new website, new logo - so the brand evolves with the work and the audience. I hope we can really develop into a fully realised online platform featuring lots of different important yet inspirational content for budding photographers/ photography enthusiasts.

Introducing Flourish

In this blog post we introduce you to Flourish, a magazine all about thriving in a particular place, community, culture and flourishing in the outdoors. Flourish are currently seeking support through their Kickstarter campaign to bring their second issue to life which will be all about the British Isles. Check out their great rewards here - we’ve pre-ordered ourselves a copy!


Volume 1 of Flourish

Volume 1 of Flourish

My name is Lucy Jane Saunders and I am a Bath Spa University Photography graduate. I started photography years before going to university as a hobby, inspired by the disposable film camera images my dad would bring home and develop after his travels abroad. I never anticipated it could become my job, yet it slowly immersed me into the world of photography and its potentials. At university my style narrowed and I found my preferred way of working. Photographers such as Jon Tonks, Colin Pantell and Robert Darch inspired my documentary approach to photographing. Yet being outdoors, travelling, and finding new locations really motivated me to keep making new work. 

After graduating two years ago I started freelancing alongside setting up the magazine publication ‘Flourish’. I have always adored working within print production and love magazine design. I initially created it out of pure passion, the desire to create new work, and design pages where photographs and text interacted on the page telling stories. But once the first volume was made I almost felt selfish keeping it to myself… the stories I had encountered travelling, the archive of photographs I had collected and the other people I collaborated with. I decided to launch a Kickstarter Campaign to see if other creatives would be interested in supporting the publication to get the magazine to print. To my surprise we achieved our target! People from all over the world backed the campaign and three months later we had enough funding to get the magazine to the printers. I sat in the post office for hours posting a host of magazines to backers and from there I tried to gain stockists to hold the rest.

Flourish became a brand rooted from its definition: “(of a living organism) grow or develop in a healthy or vigorous way, especially as the result of a particularly congenial environment.” As humans we are constantly seeking new, intriguing, and stimulating locations to explore, travel, and experience. Flourish aims to capture those moments we treasure; the bright colours, the tastes we remember, and most importantly the time spent thriving within that place. 

I wanted to capture not only the sensual elements of a location, but also its underlying struggles, and those who have met and overcome the challenges of sustainability. Those who live from the land, create from the land, and are protecting and flourishing with the nature that surrounds them.  

In recent years, photographic magazines have been blurring the lines between books and throwaway publications. Flourish is a magazine with stability, acting as a visual map for your mind, a great piece of reading material for your rucksack, and some inspiration to enjoy with your morning coffee. 

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Flourish will remind you that life is an experience, to capture those moments from other lives you cross paths with, to think more about what surrounds us in the landscapes you gaze at, and to speculate more on your next adventure.

Over the past year Flourish has thrived and I started to stock the publication in more and more independent stores. Due to the unexpected work I had to start bringing people on board and the Flourish team started to grow. My amazing supportive family started to help me get a website together, social media sites, help package, proof read and blog. It almost became a full time job for myself. 

My biggest achievement for the publication so far was definitely an unexpected win at the Creative Bath Awards in the summer of 2018. Winning Young Creative was an outstanding achievement for myself and for the magazine team. As we went from strength to strength I found the need to make more work and I was conscious people would be expecting a second volume. Depleted of money with the print of volume 1 and the lack of freelance work I could do, I find myself back in the same position as I was in with volume 1…. It’s never easy setting up a business and the profit from print is minimal, at least for the first couple of volumes. I have set up another Kickstarter to support volume 2 titled A Snippet of The British Isles where we collaborate with more photographers, writers and illustrators than we did previously in volume 1. 

Our Kickstarter Campaign is now in its last 30 days, so we are currently half way through. We are really close to making our target to get the publication to print and we would love the support of fellow photographers, creatives, and others who are passionate about the subject of Travel, Culture, Sustainability and Outdoor Living. Our campaign acts as a pre-ordering service…. where you can pre-order volume 2 A Snippet of The British Isles but also the possibility of gaining other rewards such a one off prints, illustrations and getting your name within the volume. 

If you would be interested in supporting the publication please visit our page here.

I am always on the look out for new photographers to feature within the publication. I love collaborating and love working with other graduates and fresh graduates as I was once in this position myself. I am always on the look out for something unique… someone who can create innovate stories through their pictures and who are enthusiastic about their work! 

Introducing Fiiiirst

In this blog post we introduce you to Fiiiirst, an online gallery showcasing anonymous discussions between authors photographers. Every month, two photographers are invited to interact through an image-based discussion. To keep this dialog without a pre-formated vision, the identities of each author are kept secret until the end of their respective discussion. Each picture produced is used as an inspiration to create the next one.


Who are you, what's your motto? I’m Guillaume Tomasi, a french-canadian photographer based in Montreal. 

What’s your background? Before doing photography I was a creative developer in several design studios in Geneva and in Montreal. During that time, I was addicted to creating beautiful websites with complex animations and visual effects. When I moved from France to Canada, I discovered a new city and at the same time I wanted to capture this new place with a digital camera. Slowly, photography became an obsession and in 2016 I decided to leave my job, and dedicated my time to photography.

Thomas Bouquin , Montreal

Thomas Bouquin, Montreal

Have you studied photography?  When I left my job I decided to start a BFA in Photography at Concordia University in Montreal. I discovered analog photography; how to developed negatives and how to print in the darkroom. I wanted to be more coherent when I was working on a photo project: How can I translate a subject into visuals.

It was not easy to return to school with two kids so I studied part-time and I will finally complete my degree in 2020.

What's your favourite style of photography? Its changed over time. At the beginning, I was very interested in black and white street photography - Cartier Bresson, Winogrand, Robert Frank, etc... After that I became strongly attached to colour - Joel Sternfeld, Stephen Shore, Todd Hido, etc…

Now I am more and more interested in communicating something personal who can touch a larger audience, like a universal feeling or situation. And working with something fictional is a new method that I want to implement into my future projects. An imaginary subject that can relate to our lives or society.

Kent Andreasen , Cape Town

Kent Andreasen, Cape Town

Who or what motivates you? Ideas! The moment where a tiny and simple idea becomes something bigger, where everything is possible. It really excites and motivates me.

I noticed that I am very confident at the beginning of a project because I have many pictures in mind. After that, I feel frustrated and disappointed by my results because nothing looks like what I had in mind. Slowly the project becomes something completely different that the initial idea. It's like a short moment of grief everytime.

I find inspiration in classical fields such as literature, cinema and music, but my latest projects are often sentences that I heard from discussion or a mundane situation.   

Sophie Barbasch , New York

Sophie Barbasch, New York

Can you tell us what Fiiiirst is? Sure! Fiiiirst is an online gallery showcasing anonymous discussions between authors photographers. Every month, two photographers are invited to interact through an image-based discussion. The main detail is that the photographers don’t know with whom they discuss until the discussion is completed and published on the website.

They upload their pictures into a private area and send an anonymous email to the other artist. The first artist then creates a picture. The second one receives it and uses it as an inspiration to create another picture. The discussion continues until they reach a certain amount of photographs.

I wanted this experience to be anonymous when they discuss the images so to remove the ego complex or to dictate which style (or photographs) they will then create based on the universe of their penfriend. 

Maela Ohana , Montreal

Maela Ohana, Montreal

What were your initial aims and inspirations when putting ideas together for Fiiiirst? When I discovered photography and started to follow some contemporary photographers, I noticed that they was a small community where everyone knew the name or the works of each others. I became curious in imagining what would be the result if this artist collaborated with another one, and it was a great opportunity to challenge their creative practice by placing them with another artist whose work is very different in aesthetics or themes. 

What is Fiiiirst’s biggest achievement to date? Currently, the 3rd edition is running and I really appreciate the critical response for each discussion. I receive more and more submissions for future editions and it’s very difficult to decide which one will be chosen.

When I started the first edition I had nothing except a concept and now there are 80 photographers from 29 different countries involved.

How can photographers get involved in what you do? If people want to participate they can simply send me their portfolio at guillaume@fiiiirst.com because the recruitment for the 4th edition is open until the end of January!!  They can also follow our Facebook and Instagram page to get the latest discussions and news about Fiiiirst.

Give one tip to new photography graduates. Do your thing without anticipating awards, recognitions etc… Your work will benefit to be outside this stressful and unnecessary circle. Also, don’t tease too much of your work before a publication. Consider the quality instead of the quantity on social media. It will be good in the long term. 

What does 2019 have in store for Fiiiirst? In 2019, I am going to publish the first "Fiiiirst book” which will regroup pictures from the first two editions. It won’t be the same as the website but the pictures will be mixed or edit into a global and hybrid discussion.

I hope to be able to present to you this book in the summer. It’s difficult to say exactly when it’s going to be real, because Fiiiirst is a pro-bono side project which take a lots of time and I it’s just me working on it. I will create a kickstarter campaign in a few days/weeks. 

In June 2019 I am going to launch the 4th edition of Fiiiirst and right now I am very excited when I see the names of some shortlisted photographers.

Robert Darch 'The Moor' - pre-order now

Plymouth University graduate Robert Darch’s The Moor has been published by Another Place Press and is currently available to pre-order here.

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The Moor depicts a fictionalised dystopian future situated on the bleak moorland landscapes of Dartmoor. Drawing on childhood memories of Dartmoor alongside influences from contemporary culture, the narrative references local and universal mythology to give context but suggests something altogether more unknown. The realisation of this dystopian future is specifically in response to a perceived uncertainty of life in the modern world and a growing disengagement with humanitarian ideals. The Moor portrays an eerie world that shifts between large open vistas, dark forests, makeshift dwellings, uncanny visions and isolated figures.

The sense of an on-going narrative is reinforced by the reoccurrence of characters, often appearing on edge, in peril or distressed. The inherent wildness of the landscape heightens this fragile sense of existence, with the suggestion of an unseen presence adding to the isolation and tension.

The fiction is grounded within the landscapes of Dartmoor, using found locations instead of overt staging, artificial lights orconstructed sets. Shifting between pseudo documentary and constructed photography the Moor blurs that liminal space between fiction and reality.

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Images from  The Moor

Images from The Moor

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Photograd Open 2018 - showcasing photobooks and zines

Photograd will be part of Photomonth this year with an exhibition at London Metropolitan University from Friday 16th to Thursday 29th November. We’ve already released the 30 photographers who will be exhibited, which you can find here, but in this post we introduce you to the 15 photographers whose book or zine we will be displaying in the space.

Harry Crown
Judit Sánchez
Daniella Gott
Daniel Harrington
Billie Blossom
Holly Farndell
Krasimira Butseva
Stan Dickinson
Scott Perry and Zoey Barton
Jasper Jones
Arran Davis
Amy Pezzin
Jake Kehar Gill
Callum Beaney
Charlotte Bond

University of Westminster graduate  Jasper Jones  and the series  Scroll

University of Westminster graduate Jasper Jones and the series Scroll

Manchester School of Art graduate  Daniel Harrington  and the series  Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community

Manchester School of Art graduate Daniel Harrington and the series Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community

Falmouth University graduate  Amy Pezzin  and the series  Garden of Extinction

Falmouth University graduate Amy Pezzin and the series Garden of Extinction

University of Westminster graduate  Scott Perry  and the series  Omniscient London

University of Westminster graduate Scott Perry and the series Omniscient London

Falmouth University graduate  Harry Crown  and the series  M A T E O

Falmouth University graduate Harry Crown and the series M A T E O

University of Portsmouth graduate  Krasimira Butseva  and the series  Slices of Red

University of Portsmouth graduate Krasimira Butseva and the series Slices of Red

University of East London graduate  Billie Blossom  and the series  Queer Porn Portraits

University of East London graduate Billie Blossom and the series Queer Porn Portraits

Photograd Open 2018 - exhibiting photographers

Photograd will be part of Photomonth this year with an exhibition at London Metropolitan University from Friday 16th to Thursday 29th November.

Here is a list of the 30 photographers who will be exhibited followed by a few select images.

Daniel Morgan
Alvaro Lopez
Katie Hayward
Judit Sánchez
Giulia Parlato
Dulcie Wagstaff
Peter Spurgeon
Natalia Poniatowska
Elisabetta De Guio
Claire McIntyre
Cheryl Newman
Tom Owens
Miriam Winsor
Zsuzsanna Pálmai
Lottie Wilson
Michael Morgan
Joel Biddle
Kerry Curl
Sarah-Jayne Webb
Matt Terry
Chiara Avagliano
Charlotte Bond
Paula Tollett
Ryan Hardman
Sara Cucè
Steve Le Grys
Jack Johnson
Beata Stencel
Rose Sapey
Sara Fiorino

London Metropolitan University graduate  Zsuzsanna Pálmai  and the series  1 to 7 Billion

London Metropolitan University graduate Zsuzsanna Pálmai and the series 1 to 7 Billion

University of Brighton graduate  Dulcie Wagstaff  and the series  Familiar Gardens

University of Brighton graduate Dulcie Wagstaff and the series Familiar Gardens

Carmarthen School of Art graduate Sarah-Jayne Webb and the series  A Happening

Carmarthen School of Art graduate Sarah-Jayne Webb and the series A Happening

Ravensbourne University graduate  Rose Sapey  and the series  Masterpieces Responses

Ravensbourne University graduate Rose Sapey and the series Masterpieces Responses

University of South Wales graduate  Peter Spurgeon  and the series  Docoy

University of South Wales graduate Peter Spurgeon and the series Docoy

University of East London graduate  Steve Le Grys

University of East London graduate Steve Le Grys


 

Private View: Thursday 15th November, 6pm.

London Metropolitan University, The Cass, Atrium Space, Goulston Street. E1 7TP

Use Aldgate or Aldgate East underground, or Liverpool Street for a 10 minute walk.

Milda Books presents the photobook "Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country" by Georgs Avetisjans

Milda Books presents the photobook Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country by University of Brighton graduate Georgs Avetisjans at the Photo Publishers Market organised by Brighton Photo Fringe and Photoworks.

Phoenix Brighton, October 20th - 21st. 11am - 5pm.


“Landscapes – actual, remembered or idealized – feed our sense of belonging to whatever place, region or nation that we view as homeland.”

Liz Wells
Homeland. The Longest Village in the Country (2015-2018)
is a multi-layered photographic narrative in a form of a photobook with cross-references like hyperlinks to additionally inserted stories connected to the subjects and landscape. The book is about the village where my Armenian-Greek father once had a dream to build a house for our family, but unfortunately couldn’t finish it as he passed away when I was only 6 months young.

The project explores the sea, the land and memories, how the time affects and changes our sense of a place at the same time serving a nostalgic representation of the village in Latvia - Kaltene and its recent history from World War II until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 via interviews, notes and archival imagery. As the Iron curtain fell, the local economy changed and upon joining the EU in 2004, it changed again. These historical shifts made a huge impact on the society and its dreams, many of which the younger generations have abandoned.

The place is located between the forest and the sea about 100 km northwest of the capital Riga. In the latter half of the 19th century and early 20th century it was the second most productive village in the country as 55 seagoing sailing ships were built there.

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Images from the series  The Longest Village in the Country  by Georgs Avetisjans

Images from the series The Longest Village in the Country by Georgs Avetisjans

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